SPARKLE: Sustaining Practice Assets for Research, Knowledge, Learning and Engagement | Directories | University of Leeds

” ‘Sustaining Practice Assets for Research, Knowledge, Learning and Engagement’ (SPARKLE) will be a national infrastructure for the storage, discovery, access, analysis, and preservation of practice research assets: which may include text, but also image/video/audio/software, and other less common mediums.

Practice research is a broad community that cuts across disciplines (creative arts, humanities, healthcare, and others) that is not well-served by current text-focussed repositories, needing a more considered approach to a wider range of mediums. Equally, the current repository focus on single outputs is a poor fit for the processual and interconnected nature of practice research.

SPARKLE will address these issues and fill in a significant gap in the interconnected trusted repositories landscape, as the current institutional/subject repositories lack capabilities in the management of complex, multipart, interconnected assets. It will provide an integrated technology infrastructure for innovative design and practice research, along with economies of scale through a cloud-based data service, encompassing critical FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) principles.

As a holistic service to support practice research for now and the future, SPARKLE will include capabilities for analysing quantitative, thick, and big data, and learning resources to support documenting, accessing, and reusing practice assets. This project will produce an initial scoping of the required data infrastructure and community training needs….”

Open Science Observatory – OpenAIRE Blog

“The Open Science Observatory (https://osobservatory.openaire.eu) is an OpenAIRE platform showcasing a collection of indicators and visualisations that help policy makers and research administrators better understand the Open Science landscape in Europe, across and within countries.  

The broader context: As the number of Open Science mandates have been increasing across countries and scientific fields, so has the need to track Open Science practices and uptake in a timely and granular manner. The Open Science Observatory assists the monitoring, and consequently the enhancing, of open science policy uptake across different dimensions of interest, revealing weak spots and hidden potential. Its release comes in a timely fashion, in order to support UNESCO’s global initiative for Open Science and the European Open Science Cloud (the current development and enhancement is co-funded by the EOSC Future H2020 project and will appear in the EOSC Portal).  …

How does it work: Based on the OpenAIRE Research Graph, following open science principles and an evidence-based approach, the Open Science Observatory provides simple metrics and more advanced composite indicators which cover various aspects of open science uptake such us

different openness metrics
FAIR principles
Plan S compatibility & transformative agreements
APCs

as well as measures related to the outcomes of Open Access research output as they relate to

network & collaborations
usage statistics and citations
Sustainable Development Goals

across and within European countries. ”

Is DIA proteomics data FAIR? Current data sharing practices, available bioinformatics infrastructure and recommendations for the future – Jones – PROTEOMICS – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  Data independent acquisition (DIA) proteomics techniques have matured enormously in recent years, thanks to multiple technical developments in e.g. instrumentation and data analysis approaches. However, there are many improvements that are still possible for DIA data in the area of the FAIR (Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability and Reusability) data principles. These include more tailored data sharing practices and open data standards, since public databases and data standards for proteomics were mostly designed with DDA data in mind. Here we first describe the current state of the art in the context of FAIR data for proteomics in general, and for DIA approaches in particular. For improving the current situation for DIA data, we make the following recommendations for the future: (i) development of an open data standard for spectral libraries; (ii) make mandatory the availability of the spectral libraries used in DIA experiments in ProteomeXchange resources; (iii) improve the support for DIA data in the data standards developed by the Proteomics Standards Initiative; and (iv) improve the support for DIA datasets in ProteomeXchange resources, including more tailored metadata requirements.

 

“Who Is the FAIRest of Them All?” Authors, Entities, and Journals Regarding FAIR Data Principles

Abstract:  The perceived need to improve the infrastructure supporting the re-use of scholarly data since the second decade of the 21st century led to the design of a concise number of principles and metrics, named FAIR Data Principles. This paper, part of an extended study, intends to identify the main authors, entities, and scientific journals linked to research conducted within the FAIR Data Principles. The research was developed by means of a qualitative approach, using documentary research and a constant comparison method for codification and categorization of the sampled data. The sample studied showed that most authors were located in the Netherlands, with Europe accounting for more than 70% of the number of authors considered. Most of these are researchers and work in higher education institutions. These entities can be found in most of the territorial-administrative areas under consideration, with the USA being the country with more entities and Europe being the world region where they are more numerous. The journal with more texts in the used sample was Insights, with 2020 being the year when more texts were published. Two of the most prominent authors present in the sample texts were located in the Netherlands, while the other two were in France and Australia.

 

Data Papers, A FAIR Way to Publish Research Data

“This workshop provides a complete overview to data papers. It gives a wide range of examples and offers participants the opportunity to review and assess firsthand the value of publishing data papers the FAIR way. In 2016, the FAIR data principles were first published. And in 2017, GreyNet designed a data paper template to conform with FAIR data principles and facilitate in drafting data papers. GreyNet’s first data paper was compiled and entered in the DANS EASY archive alongside its corresponding dataset. Since 2018, GreyNet’s data papers are also published in The Grey Journal. The inclusion of data papers in GreyNet’s workflow provides a viable use case for other organizations producing and publishing their research results. There are a number of stakeholders involved in the compilation and publication of data papers beginning with researchers and authors on to librarians that catalog, index, and facilitate access, retrieval and public awareness to these valuable resources….”

Towards a European network of FAIR-enabling Trustworthy Digital Repositories (TDRs) – A Working Paper | Zenodo

Philipp Conzett, Ingrid Dillo, Francoise Genova, Natalie Harrower, Vasso Kalaitzi, Mari Kleemola, Amela Kurta, Pedro Principe, Olivier Rouchon, Hannes Thiemann, & Maaike Verburg. (2022). Towards a European network of FAIR-enabling Trustworthy Digital Repositories (TDRs) – A Working Paper (v2.0). Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7034315

Abstract: This working paper is a bottom-up initiative of  a group of stakeholders from the European repository community. Its purpose is to outline an aspirational vision of a European Network of FAIR-enabling Trustworthy Digital Repositories (TDRs). This initiative originates from the workshop entitled “Towards exploring the idea of establishing the Network”. The paper was created in close connection with the wider community, as its core was built on community feedback and the first draft of the paper was shared for community-wide consultation. This paper will serve as input for the EOSC Task Force on Long Term Digital Preservation. One of the core activities mentioned in the charter of this Task Force is to produce recommendations on the creation of such a network.

The working paper puts together a vision of how a European network of FAIR-enabling TDRs could be based on the community’s needs and its most important functions: Networking and knowledge exchange, stakeholder advocacy and engagement, and coordination and development. The specific activities hosted under these umbrella functions could address the wide range of topics that are important to TDRs. Beyond these functions and the challenges they address, the paper presents a framework to highlight aspects of the Network to further explore in the next steps of its development.

 

Frontiers | Rethinking the A in FAIR Data: Issues of Data Access and Accessibility in Research

“The FAIR data principles are rapidly becoming a standard through which to assess responsible and reproducible research. In contrast to the requirements associated with the Interoperability principle, the requirements associated with the Accessibility principle are often assumed to be relatively straightforward to implement. Indeed, a variety of different tools assessing FAIR rely on the data being deposited in a trustworthy digital repository. In this paper we note that there is an implicit assumption that access to a repository is independent of where the user is geographically located. Using a virtual personal network (VPN) service we find that access to a set of web sites that underpin Open Science is variable from a set of 14 countries; either through connectivity issues (i.e., connections to download HTML being dropped) or through direct blocking (i.e., web servers sending 403 error codes). Many of the countries included in this study are already marginalized from Open Science discussions due to political issues or infrastructural challenges. This study clearly indicates that access to FAIR data resources is influenced by a range of geo-political factors. Given the volatile nature of politics and the slow pace of infrastructural investment, this is likely to continue to be an issue and indeed may grow. We propose that it is essential for discussions and implementations of FAIR to include awareness of these issues of accessibility. Without this awareness, the expansion of FAIR data may unintentionally reinforce current access inequities and research inequalities around the globe.”

 

 

AAI/OC Receives NSF Grant for Collaborative Research Coordination Network – The Alexandria Archive Institute

“We are thrilled to announce Disciplinary Improvements for Past Global Change Research: Connecting Data Systems and Practitioners, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable Open Science Research Coordination Network (FAIROS RCN) funded initiative to advance ethical scientific practices in the use of paleoecological, contemporary ecological, paleoclimatic, and archaeological data….”

FAIR-IMPACT

“In 2015 the vision of a European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) emerged. EOSC would provide an open and trusted environment for accessing and managing a wide range of publicly funded research data and related services, helping researchers reap the full benefits of data-driven science. EOSC is now entering its implementation phase (2021-2027) which requires active engagement and support to ensure widespread implementation and adoption of the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable) principles, to define and share standards and develop tools and services, to allow researchers to find, access, reuse and combine research results.

With the ambitious goal to realise an EOSC of FAIR data and services, the FAIR-IMPACT project responds to these needs by supporting the implementation of FAIR-enabling practices, tools and services across scientific communities at a a European, national and institutional level….”

ARL Applauds NSF Open Science Investment – Association of Research Libraries

“The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) commends the ongoing commitment of the US National Science Foundation (NSF) to open science. NSF today announced awards for 10 new projects focused on building and enhancing coordination among researchers and other stakeholders to advance FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, reusable) data principles and open-science practices.

The inaugural awards in NSF’s Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable, Open Science Research Coordination Networks (FAIROS RCN) program represent a pooled investment of over $12.5 million in open science from all directorates comprising NSF. This program is particularly unique given that the 10 projects are composed of 28 distinct NSF awards (detailed below) representing many organizations and institutions in the United States seeking to advance open-science efforts….”

NSF Grant for New STEM-focused Commons | Platypus – the Humanities Commons Blog

by Kathleen Fitzpatrick

The Commons team is delighted to have been awarded one of the inaugural FAIROS RCN grants from the NSF, in order to establish DBER+ Commons. That’s a big pile of acronyms, so here’s a breakdown: the NSF is of course the National Science Foundation, one of the most important federal funding bodies in the United States, and a new funder for us. The FAIROS RCN grant program was launched this year by the NSF in order to invest in Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable Open Science (FAIROS) by supporting the formation and development of Research Coordination Networks (RCN) dedicated to those principles.

We have teamed up with a group of amazing folks at Michigan State University who are working across science, technology, engineering, math, and more traditional NSF fields, all of whom are focused on discipline-based education research (DBER) as well as other engaged education research methodologies (the +). Our goal for this project is to bring them together with their national and international collaborators in STEM education to create DBER+ Commons, which will use — and crucially, expand — the affordances of the HCommons network and promote FAIR and CARE (Collective Benefit, Authority to control, Responsibility, Ethics) practices, principles, and guidelines in undergraduate, postbaccalaureate, graduate, and postdoctoral science education research activities.

 

OSSAN Conference 2022

“Open Science South Asia Network (OSSAN) aims to bring open science enthusiasts and practitioners in South Asia to the same forum to engage in an international dialogue and share good practices for a stronger, more unified and workable Open Science policy framework, especially relevant to South Asia….

Open science is an emerging concept that aims to democratize science and has been extensively advocated by researchers, policy-makers, librarians, and international organizations like UNESCO and OECD. Open Science practices have been formalized to make research more ‘inclusive’, ‘transparent’, and ‘efficient’. It is an approach designed to foster open and equitable sharing of knowledge through journals articles, greater access to data generated from research processes following the FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) principles, reorienting research assessment mechanisms to foster open science practices and sharing of other research output such as codes, hardwar.

 

However, globally more attention has been focused on the knowledge dissemination side with little or no contemplation of the knowledge creation process. Open science discussions focus mainly on the output of scientific research and how knowledge production can be more efficient, transparent, and reproducible. The cultural diversity in knowledge production is unexamined so far in the open science discourse. Insights on the knowledge creation process to make it more inclusive and collectively governed by society are also essential at this stage. Therefore,  the conference themes and discussions are aligned not only on the knowledge dissemination side but also on the creation with a specific focus on the needs of South Asia. Following this theme, Ideathon would focus on developing tangible results that aid open data in science among South Asian academics.”

Leveraging Data Communities to Advance Open Science – Ithaka S+R

“Several recent studies have indicated that large numbers of researchers in many STEM fields now accept the value of openly sharing research data. Yet, the actual practice of sharing data—especially in forms that comply with FAIR principles—remains a challenge for many researchers to integrate into their workflows and prioritize among the demands on their time.[1] In many disciplines and subfields, data sharing is still mostly an ideal, honored more in the breach than in practice.[2]

The barriers to open data sharing are numerous.[3] However, sustained funding from federal agencies in the United States including the NSF and NIH and important initiatives in other countries such as Canada’s Tri-Agency Research Data Management Policy and the European Union’s OpenAire, is creating a growing infrastructure for open sharing of research data, albeit one that highlights the tension between scientific research practices that are now regularly multi-national in scope yet exist within funding and regulatory structures determined largely by national entities.[4] In the US context, the most visible fruits of these efforts are the decentralized network of repositories that have become available to researchers in many fields and are now a vital infrastructure for data sharing across many fields. As incentive structures have slowly shifted, the number of researchers taking advantage of these resources has also grown.

The existence of these repositories are necessary enabling conditions for data sharing, but their ability to transform researcher’s practices around data depositing and sharing absent changes to incentive structures and the culture of research communities will remain uneven. Furthering the goals of open science requires convincing more researchers of the value of data sharing to themselves and to the community of researchers with whom they most tangibly identify. Creating and encouraging community norms that reward sharing is necessary because data sharing, especially FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable) compliant sharing, is hard work. Absent strong incentive and reward structures, researchers are often reluctant to take on this “extra” labor. Successful data sharing ultimately depends on cultural and social infrastructures as much as on technical infrastructures….”