Recommendations for repositories and scientific gateways from a neuroscience perspective | Scientific Data

“Digital services such as repositories and science gateways have become key resources for the neuroscience community, but users often have a hard time orienting themselves in the service landscape to find the best fit for their particular needs. INCF has developed a set of recommendations and associated criteria for choosing or setting up and running a repository or scientific gateway, intended for the neuroscience community, with a FAIR neuroscience perspective….”

Recommendations for Discipline-Specific FAIRness Evaluation Derived from Applying an Ensemble of Evaluation Tools

Abstract:  From a research data repositories’ perspective, offering research data management services in line with the FAIR principles is becoming increasingly important. However, there exists no globally established and trusted approach to evaluate FAIRness to date. Here, we apply five different available FAIRness evaluation approaches to selected data archived in the World Data Center for Climate (WDCC). Two approaches are purely automatic, two approaches are purely manual and one approach applies a hybrid method (manual and automatic combined).

The results of our evaluation show an overall mean FAIR score of WDCC-archived (meta)data of 0.67 of 1, with a range of 0.5 to 0.88. Manual approaches show higher scores than automated ones and the hybrid approach shows the highest score. Computed statistics indicate that the test approaches show an overall good agreement at the data collection level.

We find that while neither one of the five valuation approaches is fully fit-for-purpose to evaluate (discipline-specific) FAIRness, all have their individual strengths. Specifically, manual approaches capture contextual aspects of FAIRness relevant for reuse, whereas automated approaches focus on the strictly standardised aspects of machine actionability. Correspondingly, the hybrid method combines the advantages and eliminates the deficiencies of manual and automatic evaluation approaches.

Based on our results, we recommend future FAIRness evaluation tools to be based on a mature hybrid approach. Especially the design and adoption of the discipline-specific aspects of FAIRness will have to be conducted in concerted community efforts.

Open Science in the recently adopted Resolution on the Slovenian Scientific Research and Innovation Strategy 2030 – OpenAIRE Blog

“At the end of March 2022, the National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia adopted the Resolution on the Slovenian Scientific Research and Innovation Strategy 2030 which was published in the Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia in April 2022. This is a key Slovenian strategic document for research and innovation until 2030, which will be the basis for formulating policies related to social and economic development as well as to societal challenges. The Scientific Research and Innovation Strategy is inextricably intertwined with the Resolution on National Programme of Higher Education 2030, and both are harmonized with the Slovenian Development Strategy 2030. At the implementation level, the Scientific Research and Innovation Strategy will be supplemented by action plans and sectoral strategic documents (e.g., Research Infrastructure Development Plan, Open Science Action Plan, Action Plan for Technology Transfer Offices, Equal Opportunities Action Plan), which will define the set goals and upgrade them with measurable monitoring indicators.

The Scientific Research and Innovation Strategy, which is based on the Article 10 of the new Scientific Research and Innovation Activities Act, introduces Open Science as an important integral part of the scientific research. In the context of the horizontal objectives under Item 6.2., the Strategy defines six key measures in the field of Open Science, as follows:

1. Effective management and financing of the development of the national Open Science ecosystem and related national structures and infrastructures, ensuring their international alignment as well as integration into international associations and infrastructures.

2. Introduction of modern approaches to the evaluation of scientific research activity in accordance with Open Science principles to increase the quality and impact of research (e.g., DORA – San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment, Leiden Manifesto for Research Metrics, ERAC – European Research Area and Innovation Committee Guidelines).

3. Ensuring that the results of scientific research comply with the FAIR principles (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable), and that full and immediate open access is provided (subject to legitimate exceptions).

4. Establishment of a National Open Science Community for the introduction and monitoring of Open Science in Slovenia, as well as its integration into ERA and beyond.

5. Promoting the development of citizen science and public involvement in scientific research.

6. Promoting the development of a national scientific publishing system to operate according to the principles of Open Science.

These measures, which are recognised as essential for the development of Open Science in Slovenia, are the basis for the Action Plan on Open Science in preparation. Its adoption by the Government of the Republic of Slovenia is expected later this year.”

 

Collaboration across open science education: working towards a FAIR and open future – EOSC synergy

“Two years ago, the EOSC Synergy project presented at the Open Education Conference (OER20) outlining our aim to contribute to the development of a sustainable infrastructure for open learning in the European Open Science Cloud. 

Today we are presenting again at OER22 in London, providing an update on the project, but even more importantly providing a story of collaboration across the open science education and training world, bringing together communities from different countries, roles and disciplines.  

These collaborations enabled EOSC Synergy to situate its activities in a global network linked by a shared aim of working towards making open and FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Re-usable) principles the norm for research, but also for research training and education.  

The collaborations provide many examples of the conference theme ‘open in action’ and focus on different areas of openness: from community building and sharing practice across different parts of the open science education community, to creating shared resources and joining up infrastructure and resources. 

This presentation reflects on the nature of the collaborations and lessons learned, presenting details of their outputs and future plans. We aim to raise awareness of these activities and build further bridges between the open education and open science communities. In this post we highlight a selection of collaborations EOSC Synergy has been involved in focussing on open science training and education. …”

Elena Giglia, Open Science is here to stay — Filologia Classica e Italianistica – Ficlit

“What lessons did we learn from the COVID pandemic? How has the crisis impacted the current scholarly communication system? And, all in all, does the current scholarly communication work? Are you happy with the way your research is evaluated? During this workshop we shall see the reasons why we need Open Science, how it works, and what you can do starting tomorrow to open up every step of your research – without harming your career. We shall also try to overcome common misunderstandings on Open Access, Open Science and FAIR data and we shall discuss the future of research in the EOSC – European Open Science Cloud era.”

Biodiversity Community Integrated Knowledge Library (BiCIKL)

“BiCIKL will catalyse a culture change in the way biodiversity data is identified, linked, integrated and re-used across the research cycle. We will cultivate a more transparent, trustworthy and efficient research ecosystem.

BiCIKL will launch a new European starting community of key research infrastructures, researchers, citizen scientists and other stakeholders in the biodiversity and life sciences based on open science practices through access to data, tools and services.

BiCIKL is building the Biodiversity Knowledge Hub (BKH) – a single knowledge portal to interlinked and machine-readable FAIR data (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) using unique stable identifiers on specimens, genomics, observations, taxonomy and publications….”

 

Empowering Data Sharing and Analytics through the Open Data Commons for Traumatic Brain Injury Research | Neurotrauma Reports

Abstract:  Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health problem. Despite considerable research deciphering injury pathophysiology, precision therapies remain elusive. Here, we present large-scale data sharing and machine intelligence approaches to leverage TBI complexity. The Open Data Commons for TBI (ODC-TBI) is a community-centered repository emphasizing Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable data sharing and publication with persistent identifiers. Importantly, the ODC-TBI implements data sharing of individual subject data, enabling pooling for high-sample-size, feature-rich data sets for machine learning analytics. We demonstrate pooled ODC-TBI data analyses, starting with descriptive analytics of subject-level data from 11 previously published articles (N?=?1250 subjects) representing six distinct pre-clinical TBI models. Second, we perform unsupervised machine learning on multi-cohort data to identify persistent inflammatory patterns across different studies, improving experimental sensitivity for pro- versus anti-inflammation effects. As funders and journals increasingly mandate open data practices, ODC-TBI will create new scientific opportunities for researchers and facilitate multi-data-set, multi-dimensional analytics toward effective translation.

 

Digital Commons Data: for your institution’s RDM journey

“Digital Commons Data gives your institution the tools you need to successfully drive forward your Research Data Management program, with powerful features for researchers, administrators and data curators to store, manage, curate, share and preserve data. Part of the Digital Commons institutional repository system, Digital Commons Data is a turn-key, cloud-hosted, and fully supported module that delivers all the functionality to achieve an institutional research data management program without additional technical investment….”

PLOS launches new feature to promote data sharing and access

The Public Library of Science (PLOS) today announced that it is testing a new experimental open science feature intended to promote data sharing and reuse across the PLOS journal portfolio. A subset of PLOS articles that link to shared research data in a repository will now display a prominent visual cue designed to help researchers find accessible data. Sharing research data that support published articles is considered best practice as it promotes data discovery and reuse, and aligns with the Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable (FAIR) data principles.

Recommendations for Discipline-Specific FAIRness Evaluation Derived from Applying an Ensemble of Evaluation Tools

Abstract:  From a research data repositories’ perspective, offering research data management services in line with the FAIR principles is becoming increasingly important. However, there exists no globally established and trusted approach to evaluate FAIRness to date. Here, we apply five different available FAIRness evaluation approaches to selected data archived in the World Data Center for Climate (WDCC). Two approaches are purely automatic, two approaches are purely manual and one approach applies a hybrid method (manual and automatic combined).

The results of our evaluation show an overall mean FAIR score of WDCC-archived (meta)data of 0.67 of 1, with a range of 0.5 to 0.88. Manual approaches show higher scores than automated ones and the hybrid approach shows the highest score. Computed statistics indicate that the test approaches show an overall good agreement at the data collection level.

We find that while neither one of the five valuation approaches is fully fit-for-purpose to evaluate (discipline-specific) FAIRness, all have their individual strengths. Specifically, manual approaches capture contextual aspects of FAIRness relevant for reuse, whereas automated approaches focus on the strictly standardised aspects of machine actionability. Correspondingly, the hybrid method combines the advantages and eliminates the deficiencies of manual and automatic evaluation approaches. Based on our results, we recommend future FAIRness evaluation tools to be based on a mature hybrid approach. Especially the design and adoption of the discipline-specific aspects of FAIRness will have to be conducted in concerted community efforts.

Open Science Policy Austria

English (via deepl.com)

On Wednesday 23.2.2022, the Open Science Policy Austria was adopted in the course of a joint presentation to the Council of Ministers by the BMBWF, BMDW and BMK.
With this presentation to the Council of Ministers and this Open Science Policy Austria, Austria is committed to the Open Science movement and the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). The vision of Open Science is to make scientific processes more open and effective and to use both scientific excellence and open innovative and applied research to address current challenges, which are very comprehensively outlined in the policies of the EU Commission and in the framework of the Global Sustainability Goals (UN SDGs).

German original:

Am Mittwoch 23.2.2022 wurde im Zuge eines gemeinsamen Ministerratsvortrages von BMBWF, BMDW und BMK die Open Science Policy Austria beschlossen.
Mit diesem Vortrag an den Ministerrat und dieser Open Science Policy Austria bekennt sich Österreich zur Open Science Bewegung und zur European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). Die Vision von Open Science ist es, wissenschaftliche Prozesse offener und effektiver zu gestalten und sowohl wissenschaftliche Exzellenz als auch offene innovative und angewandte Forschung zur Bewältigung aktueller Herausforderungen zu nutzen, die sehr umfassend in den Policies der EU-Kommission und im Rahmenwerk der Globalen Nachhaltigkeitsziele (UN SDGs) dargestellt werden.