How does the growth of a particular publisher’s open access content factor into the relative value of a Big Deal? Part 2: The Findings – Delta Think

“Some final thoughts: (1) Overall usage was a stronger influence on the change in value than the small changes in the proportion of hybrid OA article usage. (2) Despite the range of research activity levels across our institutions, there wasn’t much difference in the proportion of the open versus controlled usage across the site-licensed institutions for either publisher. (3) COVID likely affected these trends, but precisely how was unclear. Did lockdown increase the usage or limit it? Did it affect our two publishers differently? We have no ‘non-COVID’ control unfortunately. (4) If the impact of transformative agreements on the rate of hybrid OA article output influenced these trends, the impact was quite small. Still, with more libraries negotiating transformative agreements, growth in the proportion of OA articles should accelerate. As long as usage in publisher packages continues to grow, cost per controlled use will increase more quickly than cost per use. This new cost per controlled use metric should help libraries track the return on investment from their journal package subscription payments as a growing proportion of underlying articles are free to read.”

Enabling open access: author engagement and article submission processes under transformative agreements

“Making it easy for researchers to publish their articles open access is not just a question of eliminating—or significantly lowering—the financial obstacles of APCs. Library and publisher processes, workflows, and communication streams are still deeply rooted in the old logic of accessing and producing content behind subscription paywalls.

In order for “open” to become the default in scholarly communication, these subscription-based systems will have to be reengineered so that open access is the norm and not the exception. Transformative agreements provide a framework for both libraries and publishers to initiate this process of transformation and effectively bring open access to researchers wherever they choose to publish.

To illustrate how, the next session of the ESAC Community of Practice will explore how libraries, library consortia and publishers are using transformative agreements to adapt their systems and prepare their organizations for open access in research communication on a large scale.

Focusing on the first point of contact with authors at the start of the scholarly publishing cycle, our guest speakers will share how they are reorienting their communication and engagement strategies with authors, adjusting mechanisms behind article submission process, and more….”

Enabling open access: author engagement and article submission processes under transformative agreements

“Making it easy for researchers to publish their articles open access is not just a question of eliminating—or significantly lowering—the financial obstacles of APCs. Library and publisher processes, workflows, and communication streams are still deeply rooted in the old logic of accessing and producing content behind subscription paywalls.

In order for “open” to become the default in scholarly communication, these subscription-based systems will have to be reengineered so that open access is the norm and not the exception. Transformative agreements provide a framework for both libraries and publishers to initiate this process of transformation and effectively bring open access to researchers wherever they choose to publish.

To illustrate how, the next session of the ESAC Community of Practice will explore how libraries, library consortia and publishers are using transformative agreements to adapt their systems and prepare their organizations for open access in research communication on a large scale.

Focusing on the first point of contact with authors at the start of the scholarly publishing cycle, our guest speakers will share how they are reorienting their communication and engagement strategies with authors, adjusting mechanisms behind article submission process, and more….”

CERN moves closer to achieving full open access | CERN

“Since 2014, CERN has required that all peer-reviewed primary research articles from CERN authors are published open access (OA), i.e. freely available for anyone around the world to read and re-use with appropriate attribution. This policy reflects the moral imperative of CERN as a publicly-funded organisation – supported by contributions from its Member States – to ensure that the results of our work accrue benefits to all.

I’m pleased to report that we are close to achieving full policy compliance: in 2021, 93.7% of the 1058 publications from CERN authors were published OA. …”

Wiley and French Consortium COUPERIN Sign Open Access Agreement

 

Global research and education leader Wiley today announced a new three-year agreement with COUPERIN, a consortium of higher education and research institutions in France.

This agreement is the first of its size signed by COUPERIN. Researchers from 130 member institutions across France will be granted access to all of Wiley’s hybrid and subscription journals and will be able to publish accepted articles open access in all of Wiley’s 1,400 hybrid journals. Under the terms of the agreement, individual institutions may additionally offer open access publishing in fully gold journals to their authors.

Bibsam announcement – The Company of Biologists

“The Company of Biologists is delighted to announce a three-year Read & Publish Open Access agreement with the Bibsam Consortium which runs from 1 January 2022 to 31 December 2024.

Corresponding authors at participating institutions in Sweden can publish an uncapped number of research articles immediately Open Access (OA) in our hybrid subscription journals (Development, Journal of Cell Science and Journal of Experimental Biology) plus our fully Open Access journals (Disease Models & Mechanisms and Biology Open) without paying an article processing charge (APC).

Researchers at participating institutions also benefit from unlimited access to our hybrid subscription journals, including their full archives dating back to 1853….”

A CHAPTER XXXVII (37st) OF FOCUS ON OPEN SCIENCE: BEYOND TRANSFORMATIVE AGREEMENTS

“Open Science describes the current transition in how research is undertaken, how the outputs are stored and disseminated, how researchers collaborate, how success is measured and how researchers are rewarded for more transparent and collaborative approaches. Open Science has the potential to transform the research landscape. This potential has been successfully tested – if only that – during pandemic times. 

Open Science started as a vision, aiming to address matters like research reproducibility and access to the results of publicly-funded research. The vision was generally welcome by academic and research institutions and benefited from a great advocacy movement. It’s high time now to build on practice and effective management. 
It is generally accepted in Europe that research should be as open as possible and as close as necessary. Finding the borderline between the two is one of the most important tasks for practitioners, whether they belong to funders, research organisations, their partners or researchers themselves.
Yet, this borderline is not sufficiently explored. Guidelines based on feedback and learning from practice should be created, rather sooner than later.
This innovative approach to research has further potential: to address existing inequalities and matters like inclusivity, ethics, better assessment or the missing links between science and society or to re-shape public-private partnerships.

This Open Science event is organized by the University of Stockholm, supported by UCL’s (University College London) Global Engagement Office and the UCL Office for Open Science, with technical support by Scientific Knowledge Services (SKS)….”

A Reorganization at Elsevier – The Scholarly Kitchen

“In terms of [Judy] Verses herself, she brings experience not only with a variety of technology and platform businesses but also on open access. In recent years, some of Wiley’s early leadership on open access seemed to come, perhaps coincidentally, where Elsevier stumbled. Most famously, while Elsevier continues to be locked out of Germany, Wiley struck a notable transformative agreement with Projekt DEAL. Wiley’s creativity and opportunism on such deals took place under Verses. It seems clear that Elsevier is very much hoping that Verses will further develop the customer-centric flexibility and innovation that Bayazit has promised the academic library community, not only with transformative agreements but also with the big deal itself, as seen in its recent NERL agreement. …

Will Bayazit and Verses together be able to reposition Elsevier as a dominant open access and platform provider that is allied with its academic and government customer community??

ACS and Jisc partner to enable open access publishing for researchers across the UK

The Publications division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) and Jisc consortium have reached a transitional agreement which will serve researchers in the UK across all fields of chemistry.

The three-year agreement, which will last through 2024, provides the ability for all scientific articles published by researchers at UK universities and research institutes in ACS journals to be open access (OA) at no cost to the researcher.

 

The Company of Biologists connects to the OA Switchboard

“The Company of Biologists is delighted to announce a partnership with the OA Switchboard which makes it much easier for our library customers to manage their Read & Publish agreements and to monitor the success of their Open Access (OA) strategy.

Thanks to the great success of our cost-neutral Read & Publish OA initiative, there has been a significant increase in the number of research articles published immediately OA in our hybrid subscription journals – Development, Journal of Cell Science and Journal of Experimental Biology. This is excellent news, but the lack of standardisation between systems, portals and processes has created challenges, particularly in terms of reporting and data analysis.

The OA Switchboard offers a solution. A not-for-profit, independent and industry-wide initiative, the OA Switchboard provides a central multi-publisher hub for the exchange of OA-related publication-level information. It offers standardised and authoritative data for internal and external reporting and purchasing decisions. It also feeds data automatically into existing funder, institution and library systems for further integration, processing and analysis….”

Guest Post: Open Access and the Direction Moving Forward – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Perhaps in recognition of this state of play, the BOIA Steering Committee used their recent 20th Anniversary Recommendations to help clarify the goal of open, stating that “OA is not an end in itself, but a means to other ends, above all,” the document continues, “to the equity, quality, usability, and sustainability of research.” …

After six years of thinking about scholarly communication, I’ve come to think about what needs to happen to improve this system in ways that I believe are compatible with the high-level summary recommendations of BOAI20. What I believe is that:

 

no author should be asked to pay
no reader should be unable to access the record
the idea of “excellence” should be incompatible with exclusivity, artificial scarcity, or any other device not pertaining directly to the soundness of a scholarly activity
authors should be rewarded for behavior such as making usable data available whenever appropriate, for engaging with flourishing modes of experiential reporting or communication, or for exhibiting a history of collegial peer feedback….”

Jisc and the Royal Society of Chemistry extend and expand open access publishing agreement

“Jisc and the Royal Society of Chemistry have extended and revised their transformative agreement until the end of 2024. Now utilising all previous expenditure to support open access (OA) publications, the deal covers all expected publishing output in the Royal Society of Chemistry’s hybrid journals portfolio….”

News & Views: The Impact of Transformative Agreements on the Value of the Big Deal, Part 1: Methodology – Delta Think

“How does the growth of a particular publisher’s open access content factor into the relative value of a Big Deal?

As open access publishing has grown, libraries have begun to question the value of their expensive Big Deal subscriptions. Data from Delta Think show that OA articles account for an increasing percentage of overall publishing. This study examines those data as well as usage data from library subscriptions to determine whether the overall value of Big Deals is decreasing. Included in this study is a detailed explanation for how to remove outliers to create a more reliable data set – an important component of any study, and one that could be used by librarians who wish to perform a similar analysis on their own collections. Part 2 (to be published in the May News & Views) will include the findings of this study, which are informed by information from the Delta Think Open Access Data & Analytics Tool.

This study utilizes COUNTER usage data from twenty libraries [note: eight libraries are Carnegie Research 1 (or Doctoral Very High Research Activity) and 12 others range from R2 (or High Research Activity) down to small baccalaureate] – all chosen because they had Big Deals with the publishers used in this study. The study used two large publishers with a mix of gold, hybrid, and non-OA titles across a four to five year period (note: 2016-2020 and 2017-2020 respectively).

Using data about those two publishers from Delta Think, we see that open access publication is possible – via either gold or hybrid journals – across 85-95% of the publisher portfolio – slightly higher for Publisher 2 (Figure 1)….”

Transforming Transformative Agreements

Springer Nature (as Springer) signed its first transformative read and publish agreement in 2015. This Springer compact agreement with VSNU (Association of Universities in the Netherlands) was the first agreement of its kind to combine reading and publishing fees with the aim of transitioning traditional library subscription payments into central funding to support open access (OA) publishing. It has proved to be a pivotal moment in the transition to OA.

Since then, Springer Nature has agreed many such national agreements all around the world, including the world’s largest with Projekt DEAL in Germany. Through a series of case studies, this article will examine the role these agreements have played in facilitating the transition to OA – to bring centralized funding for OA – and analyse how their nature and characteristics have evolved and adapted to reflect the differing needs of individual customers, as well as changing views.

The paper will also consider the challenges faced by publishers, institutions, and funders in agreeing transformative agreements, consider how these ‘blockers’ can be overcome, and evaluate the future role of transformative agreements as a critical precursor to achieving open science.

 

Aligning the Research Library to Organizational Strategy – Ithaka S+R

“Open access has matured significantly in recent years. The UK and EU countries have committed largely to a “gold” version of open access, driven largely by transformative agreements with the major incumbent publishing houses.[14] The US policy environment has been far more mixed, with a great deal of “green” open access incentivized by major scientific funders, although some individual universities pursued transformative agreements. Both Canadian and US libraries have benefitted from the expansion of free and open access in strengthening their position at the negotiating table with major publishers.[15]

Progress on open access has radically expanded public access to the research literature. It has also brought with it a number of second-order effects. Some of them are connected to the serious problems in research integrity and the growing crisis of trust in science.[16] Others can be seen in the impacts on the scholarly publishing marketplace and the platforms that support discovery and access.[17]

While open access has made scientific materials more widely available, it has not directly addressed the challenges in translating scholarship for public consumption. Looking ahead, it is likely that scholarly communication will experience further changes as a result of computers increasingly supplanting human readership. The form of the scientific output may decreasingly look like the traditional journal article as over time standardized data, methods, protocols, and other scientific artifacts become vital for computational consumption….”