A systematic literature review on research data management practices and services | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  Purpose

Research data management (RDM) has been called a “ground-breaking” area for research libraries and it is among the top future trends for academic libraries. Hence, this study aims to systematically review RDM practices and services primarily focusing on the challenges, services and skills along with motivational factors associated with it.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review method was used focusing on literature produced between 2016–2020 to understand the latest trends. An extensive research strategy was framed and 15,206 results appeared. Finally, 19 studies have fulfilled the criteria to be included in the study following preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

Findings

RDM is gradually gaining importance among researchers and academic libraries; however, it is still poorly practiced by researchers and academic libraries. Albeit, it is better observed in developed countries over developing countries, however, there are lots of challenges associated with RDM practices by researchers and services by libraries. These challenges demand certain sets of skills to be developed for better practices and services. An active collaboration is required among stakeholders and university services departments to figure out the challenges and issues.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of policy and practical point-of-view present how research data can be better managed in the future by researchers and library professionals. The expected/desired role of key stockholders in this regard is also highlighted.

Originality/value

RDM is an important and emerging area. Researchers and Library and Information Science professionals are not comprehensively managing research data as it involves complex cooperation among various stakeholders. A combination of measures is required to better manage research data that would ultimately move forward for open access publishing.

Institutional Strategies for the NIH Data Management and Sharing Policy: Infrastructure, Policies, and Services

“In the fall of 2020, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) released its new policy for data management and sharing that will go into effect in January 2023. This policy applies to all NIH-funded research and requires investigators to submit data management and sharing (DMS) plans.

As research data sharing has started to become an enforced requirement from funders and publishers, many academic institutions, libraries, and individual researchers have developed services, technology, and workflows to meet this requirement. As institutions gear up to meet what will be a greater demand for support among researchers on their campuses given the upcoming NIH DMS policy, identifying and sharing existing tactics and expected strategic opportunities for academic institutions is critical to meeting this demand.

The Association of Academic Health Science Libraries (AAHSL), the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges), and the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) conducted a mixed methods research project to identify and share these existing or proposed innovations for other institutions to reuse, build upon, or otherwise leverage to meet this upcoming NIH requirement….”

New Report and Resources Available on NIH Data Management and Sharing Policy – Association of Research Libraries

“The Association of Research Libraries (ARL), Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), and Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) have released a new report, Institutional Strategies for the NIH Data Management and Sharing Policy. The report shares infrastructure, services, and policies that institutions have developed to meet the requirements of the forthcoming US National Institutes of Health (NIH) policy.

In addition to the report, the site aamc.org/nihdatasharing will be a continually updated resource that contains links to ongoing institutional efforts and other relevant initiatives.”

Ten simple rules for maximizing the recommendations of the NIH data management and sharing plan | PLOS Computational Biology

Abstract:  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Policy for Data Management and Sharing (DMS Policy) recognizes the NIH’s role as a key steward of United States biomedical research and information and seeks to enhance that stewardship through systematic recommendations for the preservation and sharing of research data generated by funded projects. The policy is effective as of January 2023. The recommendations include a requirement for the submission of a Data Management and Sharing Plan (DMSP) with funding applications, and while no strict template was provided, the NIH has released supplemental draft guidance on elements to consider when developing a plan. This article provides 10 key recommendations for creating a DMSP that is both maximally compliant and effective.

 

Draft policy on University of California research data open for second round of review – Office of Scholarly Communication

“The draft of the Presidential Policy on University of California Research Data is now open for a second round of systemwide review. The purposes of the policy are to 1) clarify ownership of and responsibility for research data generated during the course of University Research, 2) encourage active data management practices, and 3) provide guidance with respect to procedures when a researcher leaves the University. 

Ownership of research data by the UC Regents is a long-standing precept originally articulated in Regulation 4 (Academic Personnel Manual 020), where it states “Notebooks and other original records of the research are the property of the University.” Not since Regulation 4’s issuance in 1958, however, has any other systemwide UC policy provided further information on this stance. To provide more guidance to the UC community, the Research Policy and Analysis (RPAC) unit within Academic Affairs at the Office of the President began work in 2017 on a draft research data policy document, originally consulting with a small advisory group of representatives from UC San Diego, UCLA, UC Berkeley, the Office of General Counsel, and California Digital Library. …”

NIH issues a seismic mandate: share data publicly

“In January 2023, the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) will begin requiring most of the 300,000 researchers and 2,500 institutions it funds annually to include a data-management plan in their grant applications — and to eventually make their data publicly available.

Researchers who spoke to Nature largely applaud the open-science principles underlying the policy — and the global example it sets. But some have concerns about the logistical challenges that researchers and their institutions will face in complying with it. Namely, they worry that the policy might exacerbate existing inequities in the science-funding landscape and could be a burden for early-career scientists, who do the lion’s share of data collection and are already stretched thin….

Such a seismic shift in practice has left some researchers worried about the amount of work that the mandate will require when it becomes effective….

Others worry that data-management activities will further sap funds from under-resourced labs. Although the policy outlines certain fees that researchers can add to their proposed budgets to offset the costs of compliance with the mandate, it doesn’t specify what criteria the NIH will use to grant these requests….

Despite its potential pitfalls, Ross thinks that the policy will have a ripple effect that will persuade smaller funding agencies and industry to adopt similar changes. “This policy establishes what people expect from clinical research,” he says. “It’s essentially saying the culture of research needs to change.” ”

Planetary Data System: Information for Data Proposers

“In response to a 2013 federal mandate the NASA Plan for Increasing Access to the Results of Scientific Research was developed to guide the management of and access to research data and peer-reviewed publications. Accordingly, the NASA Guidebook for Proposers describes the requirement that all proposals submitted under a NASA funding opportunity are required to submit a Data Management Plan. This website contains information and links that NASA’s Planetary Data System (PDS) believes will be helpful in preparing your proposal and your Data Management Plan, or simply as you develop a plan for archiving your data even if not as part of a funded proposal. If you have additional questions contact either the PDS or the relevant NASA Program Officer.

The intent of this website is to provide potential data providers with an overview of the appropriateness of the PDS as an archive for their data, the procedure for requesting letters of support for grant proposals, and the steps that a data provider would take in the generation of a PDS-compliant archive….”

Last updated October 2021.

FAIR Island: Networked, Machine-Actionable DMPs for Open Science | RDA

“Imagine a dream scenario for Open Data advocates: A working field station that supports scientists with research data management practices that allow for their data to be used beyond the initial purpose of the project! Tetiaroa is such a place and the FAIR Island Project supports researchers as we translate the broader FAIR principles into optimal data policies and technical infrastructure by leveraging RDA outputs including standards that support networked, machine-actionable Data Management Plans (DMPs), and Persistent Identifiers (PIDs). Leveraging the global research data management community’s work, FAIR Island provides a real-world example where data and knowledge collected on Tetiaroa will be curated and made openly available as quickly as possible….”

ANF science ouverte : les préinscriptions sont ouvertes (ANF open science: pre-registrations are open)

From Google’s English: 

“The national training action “Open science: towards shared knowledge” will be held on October 19 and 20, 2021 in Meudon . Proposed by the DDOR, it is organized jointly with the Inist, the CCSD, the Renatis and Médici networks, and the CNRS data workshop.

 

This ANF is mainly aimed at information professionals who have a crucial role to play in supporting scientific communities in the open science movement. It is one of the stages in the implementation of the CNRS roadmap and research data plan”

ARL Welcomes Researcher-First Policies in Bills to Reauthorize US National Science Foundation – Association of Research Libraries

“On behalf of the leaders of 125 major research libraries, the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) is pleased to see that the US House of Representatives included the following policies in the National Science Foundation (NSF) for the Future Act (H.R. 2225), which center researchers and create public value by promoting the availability of publicly funded research:

Criteria for trusted open repositories to be used by federally funded researchers sharing data, software, and code. According to the House bill, the criteria would be developed with input from the scientific community. Research libraries look forward to partnering with NSF and the scientific community to develop these criteria.
Data management plans to facilitate public access to NSF-funded research products, including data, software, and code….

We strongly support public access to publications resulting from NSF-funded research with zero embargo, and we are heartened to see language in the Senate-passed US Innovation and Competition Act (S. 1260) requiring the publication of federally funded research data within 12 months, “preferably sooner.” Making research outputs publicly available to the widest possible audience in the timeliest manner possible, and machine-accessible for computation, is critical for developing scientific insights and solutions for public health, climate, technological advancement, and more….”

Association of Research Libraries Welcomes Increased Investment in Research and Data Sharing in Reauthorization of National Science Foundation – Association of Research Libraries

“Data Management Plans

ARL is heartened to see Congress acknowledge the necessity of machine-readable data management plans (DMPs) and open repositories in supporting the academic research enterprise. At a National Science Foundation–funded conference on effective data practices in December 2019, ARL, along with the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, and the California Digital Library, convened stakeholders including university research officers, scientists, and librarians. Conference participants agreed that data management planning is important for sharing and use of research data and outputs. Participants suggested that the ability to update plans (“just in time”) across the project life cycle and as part of progress reporting would accelerate the value and adoption of DMPs among researchers, beyond what is required for compliance.

Open Repositories

ARL encourages the development of a collaborative set of data repository criteria. Coordination among federal agencies will be necessary, as will stakeholder input from researchers, repository managers, librarians, and others. ARL looks forward to continuing these conversations and building upon work already underway within groups such as the Confederation of Open Access Repositories, the Research Data Alliance, and the World Data System….”