Cell Press and The Lancet titles now included in UC-Elsevier open access publishing agreement

Beginning September 1, 2022, UC corresponding authors publishing in Elsevier’s prestigious Cell Press and The Lancet journals will be able to publish their articles as open access with financial support from the UC libraries. Cell Press publishes 50 scientific journals in the life, physical, earth, and health sciences. The Lancet is one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious medical journals.

Pathways to Open Access: Library Publishing/Repository Services and CDL – Office of Scholarly Communication

“The Pathways blog series highlights CDL’s efforts on various pathways to open access and illustrates how diverse approaches can complement and reinforce each other–and how they can raise productive tensions that push us to think more critically about the work we do. We believe this kind of approach can move us toward true and comprehensive transformation of the scholarly communications landscape….”

Pathways to Open Access: Library Publishing/Repository Services and CDL – Office of Scholarly Communication

“The Pathways blog series highlights CDL’s efforts on various pathways to open access and illustrates how diverse approaches can complement and reinforce each other–and how they can raise productive tensions that push us to think more critically about the work we do. We believe this kind of approach can move us toward true and comprehensive transformation of the scholarly communications landscape….”

UC Berkeley Library and Internet Archive co-directing project to help text data mining researchers navigate cross-border legal and ethical issues – UC Berkeley Library Update

“We are excited to announce that the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has awarded nearly $50,000 to UC Berkeley Library and Internet Archive to study legal and ethical issues in cross-border text data mining. The funding was made possible through NEH’s Digital Humanities Advancement Grant program. …”

Open-Access Publishing Expands at U. of California

“In another victory for the open-access movement, the University of California system and Springer Nature have signed an agreement that will allow scholars in the UC system to make their work in Nature titles available free.

The idea that published research should be free to read has gained steam over the past two decades. Many academics say the trend helps democratize access to the latest scholarship, both for researchers and for interested parties outside academe. But figuring out how to pay for that access remains a challenge, as the latest negotiations in the UC system demonstrate.

The agreement, which begins on August 1 and runs through 2024, is an extension of a deal the two signed in 2020. Since then, authors in the UC system have tripled their number of open-access articles in journals operated by Springer Nature, one of the umbrella companies that control much of the academic-publishing world. The new deal expands the open-access provision to the prestigious Nature titles, a goal both parties set in their initial agreement. It’s also the first agreement to include open access for Nature journals in the United States….”

Nature portfolio now included in UC-Springer Nature open access agreement – Office of Scholarly Communication

“Beginning August 1, 2022, UC corresponding authors publishing in the Nature portfolio of journals will be able to publish their articles as open access with financial support from the UC libraries. The agreement applies to a broad range of Nature hybrid and fully open access journals, including Nature, the Nature research journals, Nature Communications and Scientific Reports.

Under the agreement, the UC libraries will pay the first $1,000 of the article processing charges (“APCs”) for articles by UC corresponding authors that are accepted for publication in hybrid and open access Nature journals covered by the agreement. The remainder due on each APC will be covered by the authors themselves, utilizing research funds available to them. Authors without research funds to pay the remainder of the APC may publish their articles on a subscription basis. …”

IEEE and University of California Sign Transformative Open Access Publishing Agreement – Office of Scholarly Communication

IEEE and the University of California today announce a four-year read-and-publish agreement to enable researchers across the 10-campus university system to publish open access in the technical professional organization’s approximately 200 leading journals and magazines. IEEE is among the largest publishers of UC research.

Mat Willmott appointed first Assistant Director for Open Access Agreements – California Digital Library

“We are thrilled to announce that CDL’s Mat Willmott has been appointed the first Assistant Director for Open Access Agreements, a position that is responsible for stewarding California Digital Library activities related to publisher agreements for open access, including analysis, data and financial modeling, negotiations, implementation, administration, and assessment.  In this role, Mat will expand his current responsibilities to include leadership of all stages of UC open access publisher negotiations, as a member of UC Libraries negotiation teams, through leadership of select CDL-based mission-critical publisher negotiations, and through engagement with a variety of stakeholders across the University, including faculty, senior administrators, and library decision-makers.”

New Scholarly Communication Investments by CDL 2022 – California Digital Library

“CDL’s Shared Collections team, in consultation and collaboration with the UC-wide Shared Collections Leadership Group (SCLG), is pleased to have been able to invest in several important open resources and tools in Fiscal Year 2021-22, reflecting our commitment to ’invest in open’ by allocating a portion of our collections funding to the development of open content and infrastructure in support of UC scholarship and teaching.  Key investments include: ….”

eScholarship Pilots New Technologies – California Digital Library

“The University of California’s open access publishing program and institutional repository, eScholarship, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. As part of this celebration of the many ways eScholarship has enabled UC affiliated scholars and editors to openly share their research and publications with the world over the past two decades, we’ve taken some time to examine the nuts and bolts of our services, which have grown organically as we’ve expanded and adapted to support the changing needs of the scholarly community and the reading public.  Looking under the hood, we find that, while eScholarship is still a powerful and flexible platform, the underlying technology is somewhat outdated, with many bespoke core components.  

Looking ahead, the eScholarship team is eager to address this issue of aging and idiosyncratic technology by engaging more fully with leading open source, community-based solutions–both as a consumer of and contributor to these efforts. This desire has motivated our participation in an exciting new initiative, the Next Generation Library Publishing Project (NGLP), funded by Arcadia and focused on building interoperable tools to connect widely adopted, open source platforms and services.  With library publishers specifically in mind, NGLP has created discovery, access, administrative, and analytics/reporting layers designed to work with powerful applications like the journal publishing platforms Janeway and OJS, and the repository platform DSpace–providing combined publishing and institutional repository solutions. The project is currently piloting this modular technology approach to gather feedback from stakeholders.

As one of the pilot partners, CDL is excited to engage the eScholarship community in evaluating this early iteration of a next generation publishing and institutional repository solution. We will host a series of webinars throughout July demonstrating an early version of the NGLP stack, configured for and populated with journal and repository data from two UC campuses. Participants will be able to tour and interact with the pilot implementation, including journal and repository submission workflows and the NGLP Web Delivery Platform (WDP), the last of which provides a unified display layer across multiple content platforms. We will be particularly focused on the presentation of content and related publishing entities, in order to learn what our stakeholders find compelling, confusing, and where the gaps are at this early stage. This feedback will be shared with the NGLP project team as they work to build out a fully realized offering. …”

eScholarship pilots new technologies – Office of Scholarly Communication

“The University of California’s open access publishing program and institutional repository, eScholarship, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. As part of this celebration of the many ways eScholarship has enabled UC affiliated scholars and editors to openly share their research and publications with the world over the past two decades, we’ve taken some time to examine the nuts and bolts of our services, which have grown organically as we’ve expanded and adapted to support the changing needs of the scholarly community and the reading public.  Looking under the hood, we find that, while eScholarship is still a powerful and flexible platform, the underlying technology is somewhat outdated, with many bespoke core components.  

Looking ahead, the eScholarship team is eager to address this issue of aging and idiosyncratic technology by engaging more fully with leading open source, community-based solutions–both as a consumer of and contributor to these efforts. This desire has motivated our participation in an exciting new initiative, the Next Generation Library Publishing Project (NGLP), funded by Arcadia and focused on building interoperable tools to connect widely adopted, open source platforms and services.  With library publishers specifically in mind, NGLP has created discovery, access, administrative, and analytics/reporting layers designed to work with powerful applications like the journal publishing platforms Janeway and OJS, and the repository platform DSpace–providing combined publishing and institutional repository solutions. The project is currently piloting this modular technology approach to gather feedback from stakeholders….

SAGE Publishing and the University of California announce a transformative agreement to expand reach of UC research – Office of Scholarly Communication

SAGE Publishing and the University of California (UC) announce an agreement to expand open access publishing opportunities for researchers at all 10 UC campuses. Running through 2024, the agreement will provide funding for UC researchers to make their SAGE research articles free and openly available to the world. SAGE is one of the largest publishers of UC research in the social sciences and humanities. 

Agreement will allow UC articles to be published open access

An agreement with the UC system and the American Chemical Society, or ACS, will allow every UC-authored article in the ACS to be published open access.

Open access means that these researchers’ works will be available to more people and have a greater impact, particularly in lower-income countries, according to Jeff MacKie-Mason, UC Berkeley librarian.

MacKie-Mason noted that this has been a long-term goal of the UC Academic Senate and UC libraries. He added this will also include a lower cost of publication for the researchers.

Institutions partner with ACS to advance first California-wide transformative open access agreement – Office of Scholarly Communication

“Three California consortia, representing nearly 60 academic and research institutions, and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) today announced the first-ever California-wide transformative open access agreement. It is also ACS’ first “read and publish” agreement in the U.S. composed of multiple consortia. Through a partnership with the 10-campus University of California (UC) system, the 23-campus California State University (CSU) system, and 25 subscribing institutions represented by the Statewide California Electronic Library Consortium (SCELC), readers and researchers at dozens of California research institutions will be able to benefit from full access to subscription content while receiving support for open access publication in ACS’ portfolio of more than 75 premier chemistry journals….”