How to succeed as a global innovation hub, Opinion News & Top Stories – The Straits Times

“But funding may be the least of [Japan’s] woes. In an era where open science is becoming a worldwide trend in scientific research, Japan may be missing out due to its deep-rooted country centrism which contrasts sharply with the openness of the top innovative economies, including Singapore….

Its Fifth Science and Technology Basic Plan in 2016 aims to make Japan the “most innovation-friendly country in the world”.

The report acknowledges that Japanese science and technology has been “limited to our national borders and is thus unable to explore its full potential”. It recommends key priorities such as the promotion of open science to better develop and secure intellectual professionals….”

Open Invention Network

“Open source software has been one of the greatest sources of innovation.  Open source developers have built excellent software solutions for business, education and personal use. Free and open source programs give companies, schools, governments and users more choices, ensuring that they are getting the best possible technology for their needs. Unfortunately, the last decade has seen an enormous rise in software patent suits. Open source developers aren’t any more immune to this threat than other software vendors.  However, the culture and innovation modality of open source software, based on engagement and sharing, made it natural to build a collective defensive solution to protect and enable it.

The Open Invention Network is a shared defensive patent pool with the mission to protect Linux….”

Why it’s time to open up our patent system – The Washington Post

“One year ago, Elon Musk announced that Tesla would dismantle barriers to the use of its technology by “open sourcing” its patents and making them available for all acting in good faith to use. Because patents are usually used to close, not open, doors to competitors, the move created confusion and criticism.

But now, it also appears to have heralded a quiet revolution….

If an inventor wants to open her technology for others to innovate without worrying about permissions, there is no way to guarantee that the Patent Office will not issue a patent over the technology to a later applicant….

The patent system should pay more attention to supporting the rights of patentees to enable rather than to forbid, others from practicing patentable inventions, and to sell or waive certain patent rights or rights among certain populations. For example, if a patent holder wants to retain only rights to exclude larger competitors, or to waive all but defensive rights, enabling free use by green, humanitarian, educational, or start-up projects, for examples, it should be possible to do so. But presently, there are no easy ways to do so….

In the United States we too should explore the idea of creating one or more “open” patent options that would allow inventors to share their technology broadly while still retaining rights, for example, to enforce patents for defensive uses. We should make it easier to waive and dedicate patent rights to the public….”

Listserv for Open Working Group at Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society

“Working group [at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society] to work on open approaches to creation, invention, and entrepreneurship. Topics include creating open source licenses, open patent strategies, exploring alternative business models, open government, and the communities that arise from open and peer production.”

Listserv for Open Working Group at Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society

“Working group [at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society] to work on open approaches to creation, invention, and entrepreneurship. Topics include creating open source licenses, open patent strategies, exploring alternative business models, open government, and the communities that arise from open and peer production.”

Open Innovation in Development: Integrating Theory and Practice Across Open Science, Open Education, and Open Data by Jeremy de Beer :: SSRN

Abstract: “This article integrates the concepts of open innovation and open development. It extends the theory of open development beyond the field of information communications technology to address aspects of innovation systems more generally. It applies the concept of openness to innovation in practice across the domains of open science, open education, and open data. Creating a framework that is more integrated in theory and cross-cutting in practice creates new possibilities for interdisciplinary research and policy-relevant insights.”

The Open Innovation Research Landscape: Established Perspectives and Emerging Themes across Different Levels of Analysis by Marcel Bogers, Ann-Kristin Zobel, Allan Afuah, Esteve Almirall, Sabine Brunswicker, Linus Dahlander, Lars Frederiksen, Annabelle Gawer, Marc Gruber, Stefan Haefliger, John Hagedoorn, Dennis Hilgers, Keld Laursen, Mats Magnusson, Ann Majchrzak, Ian P. McCarthy, Kathrin M. Moeslein, Satish Nambisan, Frank T. Piller, Agnieszka Radziwon, Cristina Rossi Lamastra, Jonathan Sims,

Abstract: “This paper provides an overview of the main perspectives and themes emerging in research on open innovation. The paper is the result of a collaborative process among several open innovation scholars — having a common basis in the recurrent Professional Development Workshop (PDW) on “Researching Open Innovation” at the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management. In this paper, we present opportunities for future research on open innovation, organized at different levels of analysis. We discuss some of the contingencies at these different levels, and argue that future research needs to study open innovation — originally an organizational-level phenomenon — across multiple levels of analysis. While our integrative framework allows comparing, contrasting, and integrating different perspectives at different levels of analysis, further theorizing will be needed to advance open innovation research. On this basis, we propose some new research categories as well as questions for future research — particularly those that span across research domains that have so far developed in isolation.”