Open4DE Spotlight on Finland – An advanced culture of openness shaped by the research community

“In a comparison of European Openness strategies, Finland stands out for its sophisticated system of coordinated policy measures. While other countries have a strategy that bundles different aspects of the Openness culture into one central policy, the Finnish model impresses with unity in diversity. The website of the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies, which was set up specifically to provide information on Open Science (OS), lists four national policies on OS and research in Finland. In addition to a policy for data and methods, a policy on open access to scholary publications and a policy on open education and educational ressources document activity at a high level. The openness culture in Finland targets all stages of scientific communication but also teaching and learning. In addition, a national information portal provides orientation on publication venues, projects and publicly funded technical infrastructures. It is an exemplary tool to get an overview of the constantly growing Open Access (OA) and OS ecosystem and its numerous products and projects….”

FinELib partners with the Open Library of Humanities – FinELib

“FinELib and the not-for-profit Open Library of Humanities have signed a three-year (2022–2024) agreement that provides support for OLH through its Library Partnership Subsidy Model.

The partnership with OLH is FinELib’s first with a scholar-led diamond OA publisher.

Journals that have joined OLH include Glossa: a journal of general linquistics, Ethnologia Europaea, Architectural Histories as well as OLH’s flagship journal, the multidisciplinary Open Library of Humanities Journal….”

Uses of the Journal Impact Factor in national journal rankings in China and Europe – Kulczycki – Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology – Wiley Online Library

Abstract:  This paper investigates different uses of the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) in national journal rankings and discusses the merits of supplementing metrics with expert assessment. Our focus is national journal rankings used as evidence to support decisions about the distribution of institutional funding or career advancement. The seven countries under comparison are China, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Norway, Poland, and Turkey—and the region of Flanders in Belgium. With the exception of Italy, top-tier journals used in national rankings include those classified at the highest level, or according to tier, or points implemented. A total of 3,565 (75.8%) out of 4,701 unique top-tier journals were identified as having a JIF, with 55.7% belonging to the first Journal Impact Factor quartile. Journal rankings in China, Flanders, Poland, and Turkey classify journals with a JIF as being top-tier, but only when they are in the first quartile of the Average Journal Impact Factor Percentile. Journal rankings that result from expert assessment in Denmark, Finland, and Norway regularly classify journals as top-tier outside the first quartile, particularly in the social sciences and humanities. We conclude that experts, when tasked with metric-informed journal rankings, take into account quality dimensions that are not covered by JIFs.

 

Learned Societies and Responsible Research: Results of the survey for the TSV member societies | Tieteellisten seurain valtuuskunta

Abstract:  The Federation of Finnish Learned Societies studied its member societies’ activities related to responsible research in connection to open science, research integrity and research evaluation. In addition to these areas, the assessment covered the societies’ scientific activities and activities promoting societal impact, as well as the effects of the coronavirus pandemic on the societies’ ability to operate. The material was gathered through a survey carried out in November 2021. A total of 116 member societies, representing various fields, responded to it.

 

Research performance and scholarly communication profile of competitive research funding: the case of Academy of Finland | SpringerLink

Abstract:  The Academy of Finland (AKA), Finland’s major public research funding agency, uses a Web of Science (WoS) based bibliometric indicator to assess the performance of research it has funded. We use an alternative methodology to compare (1) the research performance and (2) the scholarly communication profile of AKA-funded research to the Finnish universities’ entire output across the major fields of arts and sciences. Our data consists of 142,742 publications (years 2015–2018) registered in the national information service, which integrates Current Research Information System (CRIS) data of 13 Finnish universities. Research performance is analyzed using the Finnish community-curated expert-based rating of publication channels (so-called JUFO). Our results show that compared to the Finnish universities’ entire output a larger share of AKA-funded research is published in leading JUFO rated journals and book publishers. JUFO and WoS-based indicators produced consonant results regarding the performance of AKA-funded research. Analysis of publication profiles shows that AKA-funded research is more focused than the universities’ output on using peer-reviewed publications, articles published in journals, English language, foreign publishers and open access publishing. We conclude that the CRIS-based publication data can support multidimensional assessments of research performance and scholarly communication profiles, potentially also in other countries and institutions. CRIS development and maintenance require multi-stakeholder commitment, resources and incentives to ensure data quality and coverage. To fully recognize diverse open science practices and to enable international comparisons, CRISs need further development and integration as data sources.

 

Open4DE Spotlight on Finland – An advanced culture of openness shaped by the research community

“Open Access (OA) is developing in an area of tension between institutional and funder policies, the economics of publishing and last but not least the communication practices of research disciplines. In a comparison across European countries, very dynamic and diverse approaches and developments can be observed. Furthermore, this international and comparative perspective helps us to assess the state of open access and open science (OA and OS) in Germany. In this series of Open4DE project blog posts, we will summarize what we have learned in our in-depth conversations with experts on developing and implementing nationwide Open Access strategies.

After starting this series with an article about Lithuania and Sweden, we now continue our journey around the Baltic Sea. Our next stop is Finland:

In a comparison of European Openness strategies, Finland stands out for its sophisticated system of coordinated policy measures. While other countries have a strategy that bundles different aspects of the Openness culture into one central policy, the Finnish model impresses with unity in diversity. The website of the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies, which was set up specifically to provide information on Open Science (OS), lists four national policies on OS and research in Finland. In addition to a policy for data and methods, a policy on open access to scholary publications and a policy on open education and educational ressources document activity at a high level. The openness culture in Finland targets all stages of scientific communication but also teaching and learning. In addition, a national information portal provides orientation on publication venues, projects and publicly funded technical infrastructures. It is an exemplary tool to get an overview of the constantly growing Open Access (OA) and OS ecosystem and its numerous products and projects….”

Open4DE Spotlight on Finland – An advanced culture of openness shaped by the research community – Open Access Blog Berlin

“Such an advanced stage in the development of openness can only be achieved through the persistence of political goals. The basis for this is a political and scientific culture whose fundamental values favour the idea of openness. OS and OA are seen as aspects of a comprehensive, science-ethical framework that unites issues such as internationalisation, gender equality and integrity of science in the term “responsible science”. In its guidelines Responsible conduct of research and procedures for handling allegations of misconduct in Finland the Finnish National Board of Research Integrity (TENK) establishes this connection between responsible conduct in science and openness. The 2012 version which is still valid today states:

2. The methods applied for data acquisition as well as for research and evaluation, conform to scientific criteria and are ethically sustainable. When publishing the research results, the results are communicated in an open and responsible fashion that is intrinsic to the dissemination of scientific knowledge (highlighting by the authors of this article). …”

Open-Access-Strategie – Open Access Blog Berlin

“Open Access (OA) is developing in an area of tension between institutional and funder policies, the economics of publishing and last but not least the communication practices of research disciplines. In a comparison across European countries, very dynamic and diverse approaches and developments can be observed. Furthermore, this international and comparative perspective helps us to assess the state of open access and open science (OA and OS) in Germany. In this series of Open4DE project blog posts, we will summarize what we have learned in our in-depth conversations with experts on developing and implementing nationwide Open Access strategies.

After starting this series with an article about Lithuania and Sweden, we now continue our journey around the Baltic Sea. Our next stop is Finland:

In a comparison of European Openness strategies, Finland stands out for its sophisticated system of coordinated policy measures. While other countries have a strategy that bundles different aspects of the Openness culture into one central policy, the Finnish model impresses with unity in diversity. The website of the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies, which was set up specifically to provide information on Open Science (OS), lists four national policies on OS and research in Finland. In addition to a policy for data and methods, a policy on open access to scholary publications and a policy on open education and educational ressources document activity at a high level. The openness culture in Finland targets all stages of scientific communication but also teaching and learning. In addition, a national information portal provides orientation on publication venues, projects and publicly funded technical infrastructures. It is an exemplary tool to get an overview of the constantly growing Open Access (OA) and OS ecosystem and its numerous products and projects….”

News – Four universities from the FinELib consortium join the Open Library of Humanities library partnership subsidy model

“We are pleased to announce that FinELib, a consortium of Finnish universities, research institutions, and public libraries have signed an agreement that provides support for the Open Library of Humanities from four of their member institutions: Abo Akademi University, University of Eastern Finland, University of Helsinki and University of Jyväskylä. ”

Avointen tiedejulkaisujen osuus jatkoi kasvuaan vuonna 2021 – Tietolinja

From Google’s English:  “The share of open publications in all peer-reviewed articles at Finnish higher education institutions rose to 77.9% last year. Both universities and polytechnics reached the same percentage. In previous years, the openness of publications has been more common in polytechnics than in universities, but now universities have closed the gap….

The share of open publications in universities increased by more than six per cent compared to the previous year. However, this time the statistical data were collected from the July publication data portal a couple of months later than in the previous year, which may affect the comparability of the figures somewhat. During the year, the share of open publications will gradually increase as the publications are co-recorded and the embargo periods for co-recordings expire….

In most universities, the proportion of open publications was close to or somewhat above 80%. The top of statistics in recent years is no longer alone in its own readings, as other universities have also utilized Jyväskylä’s experience in developing their own processes.

 

The most significant trend in the last couple of years has been the increase in the immediate transparency of publications. An increasing number of publications are openly available on the publisher’s service, either as part of a fully open publication channel or as part of an open hybrid publication channel. For peer-reviewed articles, the combined share of such publications already open to the publisher reached 59.6% last year (2020: 48.1%)….”

Learned societies promoting responsible research – Findings from the member society survey | tsv.fi

The promotion of scientific activities and general understanding of science are at the heart of the operations of learned societies. Some societies are active in the areas of open science and research evaluation, whereas tasks related to research integrity play only a minor role in their activities.

In November 2021, the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies carried out a survey amongst its member societies focusing on their activities related to the promotion of responsible research. Of the 291 member societies, a total of 116 societies representing various fields responded to the survey. 

The survey examined the objectives and operations of the societies, as well as their participation in the promotion of responsible research in the areas of open science, research integrity and research evaluation. Responsible research promotes reliable and collectively accepted practices of producing, publishing and evaluating research-based knowledge. Responsible research is present in the activities of the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies and the research support bodies associated with it: the Open Science Coordination, the Publication Forum (JUFO), the Committee for Public Information (TJNK) and the Finnish National Board on Research Integrity TENK.

 

Policy for open scholarship | Finnish National Open Science and Research Coordination

DOI: https://doi.org/10.23847/tsv.227

The policy for open scholarship brings together the previous policies and recommendations made within the framework of the Open Science and Research Coordination. The policy focuses on the culture of open scholarship of an organisation. In addition, previous policies will be supplemented with perspectives related to services, incentives, and interaction.

 

National Library of Finland becomes new Opening the Future member

“CEU Press are pleased to announce that the National Library of Finland is a new member of their Opening the Future (OtF) programme. With roots stretching back to 1640 and to the establishment of the Academy of Turku, the National Library is a cultural heritage organisation that is open to all, providing nationwide services to citizens, scientific communities, and others.

The National Library has chosen to sign up to the Library Selection Package containing 50 books selected by an independent panel of librarians. This selection is a cross-section of the other three packages and represents those CEU Press titles that might be of interest to a library across a number of disciplines.

The Library’s membership fee allows CEU Press to make new books open in ways that do not burden authors that do not have research grants to pay book processing charges. The Press has already released its first OA book funded entirely by Opening the Future members, and has another 5 in the pipeline….”

Equity and diversity in Open Access. National and regional OA publishing platforms Webinar

This SPARC Europe’s webinar brought together voices from Croatia, France, Finland, the Netherlands, and Spain. Experts from these countries talked us through their initial influences and motivations for establishing national and regional platforms. They shared their perspectives on building and running national and regional OA publishing platforms and spoke about how they had evolved over time through presentations. A panel discussion touched upon challenges they had encountered and shared the lessons they had learned when joining forces and collaborating. They also talked about their future plans to increase collaboration be this locally or internationally. This webinar focused on the following topics: 1. What community-governed, publicly-funded not-for-profit national and regional OA publishing platforms are already set up in Europe 2. Which opportunities and challenges come with setting up a national or regional OA platform and collaborating with smaller publishers 3. What the best practices for national and regional OA platforms are, as seen by experienced experts in the field

See the slide deck here: https://zenodo.org/record/5776490