SPARC / ORFG Webinar – Apr 20, 2022 – SPARC

“The Open Research Funders Group (ORFG) is a partnership of 24 leading philanthropic organizations committed to the open sharing of research outputs, representing the first community of practice of its kind. ORFG members have a shared belief that open research benefits society by accelerating the pace of discovery, reducing information-sharing gaps, encouraging innovation, and promoting reproducibility. The ORFG is an initiative of SPARC.

The ORFG has, since its inception in late 2016, worked to serve both as a community of practice and as an amplifier of the funder’s voice with respect to open research. Over the last year, the ORFG launched several new initiatives designed to advance open research within the membership, as well as enact systems-level change in the larger ecosystem. 

In this webinar, the ORFG team will share information on some of these initiatives, including the Open Access Funder Cohort Program, the Open & Equitable Model Funding Program, the ORFG-led National Academies Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science, and the Higher Education Leadership Initiative for Open Scholarship (HELIOS). An open Q&A will follow….”

Open Science Success Stories

“The Open Science Success Stories Database compiles research articles, perspectives, case studies, news stories, and other materials that demonstrate the myriad ways in which open science benefits researchers and society alike. 

Scientists, scholars, librarians, department chairs, university administrators, philanthropic program officers, government agency representatives, policymakers, publishers, journalists and other stakeholders can use the curated resources to understand how open science is positively impacting specific disciplines and communities, as well as how these lessons can be applied to the global scientific endeavor.

The Open Science Success Stories Database is a collaboration between Arizona State University and the Open Research Funders Group, in conjunction with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science. …”

Caitlin Carter Joins ORFG as HELIOS Project Coordinator

The Open Research Funders Group is pleased to announce that Caitlin Carter has joined the organization as the inaugural Higher Education Leadership Initiative for Open Scholarship (HELIOS) Project Coordinator. In her new role, Caitlin will operationalize HELIOS, an ambitious effort to align higher education practices and incentives with open research values.

Project Coordinator for the Higher Education Leadership Initiative for Open Scholarship (HELIOS)

“The Project Coordinator will be responsible for operationalizing the HELIOS concept.  This includes, but is not limited to, the following activities:

Coordinating project management activities, resources, and scheduling

Creating and maintaining comprehensive project documentation, plans and reports

Managing regular communications and updates within the HELIOS membership

Organizing, planning, and managing community building events for HELIOS members, the wider Roundtable community, and others in the research ecosystem committed to (or interested in) open scholarship

Cultivating and coordinating grassroots activities within the HELIOS community to improve understanding and adoption of open scholarship activities and incentives

Breaking projects into doable actions and set timeframes

Liaising with HELIOS members to identify and define requirements, scope and objectives

Acting as the first point of contact and communicating project status to HELIOS…”

Good Practices Primer – Code and Software (community enhanced).docx

“As organizations develop open science policies pertaining to code and software, they can maximize their open source investments by considering the following issues: ? Timing . Does the funder or institutional policy require that code or software be made openly available immediately upon the posting of research findings (e.g., publication of an article, deposit of a dataset), or with some embargo (noting that open components remain open throughout)? Will institutions and researchers develop policies for community development of code throughout the entire lifecycle? ? Financial Support. W ill the relevant policy maker provide funding to defray costs of preparing and/or depositing the code or software, as well as providing the ongoing support to the community that receives or supports the code ? I f so, is there a cap on the amount? Must the researcher explicitly account for these expenses at the time of proposal development or project design? ? Viability, Sustainability , Future Proofing and Maintenance . Is there an existing community of developers or users that could be engaged or leveraged? If necessary, what is the viability of forming a new community with skill, interest, capacity and freedom to develop and maintain the code? What are the expectations for the duration and extent to which code should be kept up to date? Is there funding to support community development, ongoing maintenance of the software, or dependencies of the software? Is there a plan for sustainability of the community of developers and users? ? Proprietary Software. To the extent that some or all of the code base upon which research relies cannot be put under an open source license, what steps can be taken to reduce restrictions on its reuse? ? Licensing. W hat type of licensing requirements will the policy include to facilitate reuse? What are the goals of the researcher, university, funder, and society and what licenses support these goals? What resources are available to the researcher? How can institutions support the researchers? What support is available to support researchers trying to ensure compliance with licenses of underlying software dependencies? ? Metadata. What documentation and descriptive details are needed to understand and execute the code or run the software program? How will the computational environment in which software or code was originally executed be described and archived? Is the documentation and accompanying material prepared in a manner such that any reasonably adept programmer and systems engineer could easily set up, compile and run it? ? Preservation. What constitutes an appropriate deposit location for the code or software? Is there a repository that is appropriate for the subject matter in question, and/or has emerged within a specific research community as the default resource in that field? Is the repository secure, stable, open and discoverable for all to access? ? Attribution. How will the creators of the software be credited for their work, and how will the code be referred to using identifiers? How will the provenance of non-code contributions, such as design or funding, be recorded? What mechanisms exist for persistent citation? How do identifiers and provenance work interoperate with other systems? ? Further contributions. How will the project build in processes or allocate funds to give back to open source tools which it uses, in order to make a more sustainable ecosystem as a whole? ? Integration. How will an open source programs office (OSPO) integrate with the university community? How does the OSPO support the creation of software inventories, metrics, assessment, etc.? How does the OSPO work with research administration including issues such as ethical use of software? …”

Beyond manuscript peer review – Announcing Open Grant Reviewers in the making

“We are thrilled to announce that PREreview will work with Open Research Funders Group (ORFG) and Health Research Alliance (HRA) to develop Open Grant Reviewers, a mentoring and training program for grant reviewers founded on principles of equity, openness, and social justice.

At PREreview, we are passionate about re-imagining a scholarly peer review process where all researchers are trained, valued, and recognized for their contributions to advancing knowledge….

With Open Reviewers, our training and mentoring program that empowers early-career researchers (ECRs) to contribute to scholarly peer review, we engage researchers in conversations around how systems of oppression manifest in the peer review process, how to identify how our own biases inevitably affect how we review and how to address it in service of better peer review.

While Open Reviewers in its current format is meant to train researchers in how to conduct manuscript peer review, much of its content and format can be adapted to other forms of reviewing, such as grant reviewing.

It is in this capacity that PREreview is collaborating with the ORFG and HRA, organizations who have already begun the groundwork towards the development of an Open & Equitable Model Funding Program, a new model of grantmaking to make both the process of grantmaking and the resulting research outputs more transparent, equitable, and inclusive. The program will design a range of interventions across the grantmaking cycle, including how funding schemes are developed, socialized, reviewed, overseen, supported, and evaluated. The plan is to pilot these interventions with a cohort of philanthropies in 2022 and 2023….”

Funders Group Hires New Fellow to Craft Best Practices for Equity in Grantmaking Process – SPARC

“SPARC welcomes Eunice Mercado-Lara as the new Open & Equitable Civic Science Fellow for the Open Research Funders Group (ORFG). In this new role, she will work with traditionally marginalized researchers, philanthropies, and other stakeholders to develop and pilot a model funding program to make both the process of grantmaking and the resulting research outputs more transparent, equitable, and inclusive.

The two-year fellowship is supported by the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, the Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation, and the Rita Allen Foundation. In addition to the ORFG, the Health Research Alliance will serve as a key enabler of this project. Mercado-Lara will be part of an incoming cohort of Civic Science Fellows across 21 host organizations.

Recognizing that the potential for closed practices, bias, and inequity exists across the entire grantmaking life cycle, the Open & Equitable Model Funding Program will pilot interventions across key steps of program development, review, selection, results dissemination, and evaluation and assessment. This work will be managed by Mercado-Lara in close collaboration with funders, subject matter experts, and traditionally marginalized scholars. …”

ORFG Civic Science Fellow

“The ORFG is seeking a fellow to help develop, launch, and oversee an Open & Equitable Model Funding Program to address inequities in the research community.  The ORFG has come to the belated realization that we need to be much more actively engaged in building a just, inclusive world.  Given our remit, we aspire to leverage open research practices to create a more transparent, welcoming, and collaborative research ecosystem. This has the potential to close knowledge gaps and level the playing field for researchers around the world. Paywalls and siloed systems serve as barriers between the “haves” and the “have-nots” in the research community. This wall often presents itself at the first point of exploration, limiting the potential audience to well-funded researchers with strong professional networks and robust institution-sponsored subscriptions, excluding many who might bring new and differing perspectives to the research process.  Open activities can be a necessary, though by no means sufficient, tool to lower these barriers.

In 2020, the ORFG launched an Equity & Open Science Working Group, which includes representatives from five ORFG members, as well as seven scholars, scientists, and activists working at the intersection of open research and marginalized communities.  The working group has determined that to rapidly and visibly champion a more equitable and open research environment, philanthropies should leverage the best asset they bring to the research conversation – their grantmaking capabilities. The ORFG, in collaboration with the Health Research Alliance, has created the rough framework of an Open & Equitable Model Funding Program, co-created from the ground up with traditionally underrepresented communities and based on principles of equity, social justice, and open research….”

Incentivization Blueprint — Open Research Funders Group

“A growing number of funders are eager to encourage grantees to share their research outputs – articles, code and materials, and data. To accelerate the adoption of open norms, deploying the right incentives is of paramount importance. Specifically, the incentive structure needs to both reduce its reliance on publication in high-impact journals as a primary metric, and properly value and reward a range of research outputs.

This Incentivization Blueprint seeks to provide funders with a stepwise approach to adjusting their incentivization schemes to more closely align with open access, open data, open science, and open research. Developed by the Open Research Funders Group, the Blueprint provides organizations with guidance for developing, implementing, and overseeing incentive structures that maximize the visibility and usability of the research they fund.

A number of prominent funders have committed to taking steps to implement the Incentivization Blueprint. Among them are the following: …”

Open Research Funders Group (ORFG) | DORA

“The ORFG released guidance for funders called, Incentivizing the sharing of research outputs through research assessment: a funder implementation blueprint. The group created the document to assist funders in encouraging researchers to maximize the impact of their work by openly sharing research outputs. The blueprint identifies three goals to be successful:

change the perception that publication in high-impact journals is the only metric that counts;
provide demonstrable evidence that, while journal articles are important, we value and reward all types of research outputs; and
ensure that indicators like the venue of publication or journal impact factor are not used as surrogate measures of quality in researcher assessment.

To do this, the blueprint provides three steps with concrete actions for funders: 1) policy development and declarations, 2) implementation, and 3) engagement.  Template language for funders is included in the document to promote easy uptake….”

Erin McKiernan Brings Expertise to New Role with SPARC’s Open Research Funders Group – SPARC

“SPARC is pleased to announce Dr. Erin McKiernan has joined SPARC as its new Community Manager for the Open Funders Research Group (ORFG). In her new role, Erin will work with existing and prospective ORFG members to enumerate and develop the tools and resources needed to launch, oversee, and expand open policies. 

The ORFG is a partnership of leading philanthropic organizations committed to the open sharing of research outputs. It engages a range of stakeholders to create policies that promote greater dissemination, transparency, replicability and reuse of research. As the ORFG’s inaugural Community Manager, Erin will engage with the group’s members and other philanthropies interested in exploring open policies to expand upon the ORFG’s innovative “community of practice” approach to advancing open principles….”

The Open Research Funders Group is Hiring a Community Manager — Open Research Funders Group

“The Community Manager will expand the ORFG’s capacity, helping to liaise with existing and prospective ORFG members to better understand the tools and resources necessary for developing, launching, and overseeing open policies. The Community Manager will increase the ORFG’s participation in events, respond to opportunities, and cultivate strategic relationships with research stakeholders. Additionally, the Community Manager will help further develop ORFG programming, including collecting and analyzing existing funder policies to determine best practices, cohort clustering, and opportunities for information-sharing. The role will also engage with targeted funders to understand hurdles to policy adoption and appropriate tools to address these issues….”

The Open Research Funders Group is Hiring a Community Manager — Open Research Funders Group

“The Community Manager will expand the ORFG’s capacity, helping to liaise with existing and prospective ORFG members to better understand the tools and resources necessary for developing, launching, and overseeing open policies. The Community Manager will increase the ORFG’s participation in events, respond to opportunities, and cultivate strategic relationships with research stakeholders. Additionally, the Community Manager will help further develop ORFG programming, including collecting and analyzing existing funder policies to determine best practices, cohort clustering, and opportunities for information-sharing. The role will also engage with targeted funders to understand hurdles to policy adoption and appropriate tools to address these issues….”