Press Release — LIBER Signs MoU with the European Citizen Science Association (ECSA)  – LIBER Europe

“LIBER, the Association of European Research Libraries, and the European Citizen Science Association (ECSA), have, as per the 20th of January 2022, signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to develop, promote and facilitate citizen science-related support services at research libraries within Europe. …”

Frontiers | Sounding the Call for a Global Library of Underwater Biological Sounds | Ecology and Evolution

Abstract:  Aquatic environments encompass the world’s most extensive habitats, rich with sounds produced by a diversity of animals. Passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) is an increasingly accessible remote sensing technology that uses hydrophones to listen to the underwater world and represents an unprecedented, non-invasive method to monitor underwater environments. This information can assist in the delineation of biologically important areas via detection of sound-producing species or characterization of ecosystem type and condition, inferred from the acoustic properties of the local soundscape. At a time when worldwide biodiversity is in significant decline and underwater soundscapes are being altered as a result of anthropogenic impacts, there is a need to document, quantify, and understand biotic sound sources–potentially before they disappear. A significant step toward these goals is the development of a web-based, open-access platform that provides: (1) a reference library of known and unknown biological sound sources (by integrating and expanding existing libraries around the world); (2) a data repository portal for annotated and unannotated audio recordings of single sources and of soundscapes; (3) a training platform for artificial intelligence algorithms for signal detection and classification; and (4) a citizen science-based application for public users. Although individually, these resources are often met on regional and taxa-specific scales, many are not sustained and, collectively, an enduring global database with an integrated platform has not been realized. We discuss the benefits such a program can provide, previous calls for global data-sharing and reference libraries, and the challenges that need to be overcome to bring together bio- and ecoacousticians, bioinformaticians, propagation experts, web engineers, and signal processing specialists (e.g., artificial intelligence) with the necessary support and funding to build a sustainable and scalable platform that could address the needs of all contributors and stakeholders into the future.

South Africa’s draft open science policy promises shake-up – Research Professional News

“All publicly-funded research conducted in South Africa will have to be published in open access journals under a draft national open science policy released this week.

The draft was published on 15 February by the Academy of Science of South Africa, ahead of a workshop to discuss it on 22 February. It was drawn up under the leadership of Ahmed Bawa, the chief executive of Universities South Africa….

The draft policy suggests the establishment of a “national forum” to promote best practice in open science. Researchers will also be offered as-yet unspecified incentives to encourage them to publish in open-access journals….

The policy recommends that a national agency be established to curate publicly-funded research data. Also on the cards is a “federated open science infrastructure” which will make it easier for everyone to access research outputs….

The use of (not) defining Citizen Science – Citizen Science | CS Track Project

“Even among researchers who are highly specialised on the topic there is no consensus about what exactly citizen science means. Funding agencies and policy makers also use it in various different ways:: “[…] no central authority or governing body oversees the field, and even agreeing about who counts as a citizen scientist is challenging.” (Rasmussen and Cooper, 2019, p. 1) But while there is a broad consensus that the term is fuzzy, the question whether it should be defined at all remains controversial….”

The use of (not) defining Citizen Science – Citizen Science | CS Track Project

“Even among researchers who are highly specialised on the topic there is no consensus about what exactly citizen science means. Funding agencies and policy makers also use it in various different ways:: “[…] no central authority or governing body oversees the field, and even agreeing about who counts as a citizen scientist is challenging.” (Rasmussen and Cooper, 2019, p. 1) But while there is a broad consensus that the term is fuzzy, the question whether it should be defined at all remains controversial….”

Engaging people with lived experience in peer review: Expanding the role of citizen reviewers – Jaggers – 2021 – Alzheimer’s & Dementia – Wiley Online Library

Abstract Background Research shows that including the voices of people with lived experience (PWLE) in the full research process ensures that the research is both relevant and meaningful in real-life contexts. However, operationalizing this in a meaningful way can be challenging, particularly in the context of dementia. Since 2014, the Alzheimer Society of Canada (ASC) has included PWLE in the Alzheimer Society Research Program’s (ASRP) peer review process through the role of the citizen reviewer, however, this has been limited in scope. In 2019, a pilot study expanded this role to a broader panel of citizen reviewers who are equal participants in the peer review process, scoring applications and providing valuable contextual feedback. In 2020, this process was further formalized, allowing greater participation and enhanced engagement. Method Qualitative feedback was collected from panelists following the 2019 pilot which demonstrated a collective desire to improve overall engagement while formalizing a systematic process. The data was thematically assessed and used to create several resources to recruit, maintain, and train citizen reviewers as equal and valued participants in the peer review process. This was conducted within the context of the pandemic, in which the full process was adapted to a virtual peer review process. Result Data from the 2019 pilot resulted in a four-step process for recruitment, orientation, and training of citizen reviewers. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with potential candidates, followed by a comprehensive orientation package, and a virtual orientation session designed for PWLE that included role playing and case studies. Lastly, technical support meetings were created to support the virtual nature of the process. Twenty-five citizen reviewers were recruited, an increase of 44% participation from the previous year. This, in turn, has led to the creation of a new resource guide for engaging PWLE in peer review, which demonstrates how to operationalize meaningfully engaging and valuing the experiences of people living with dementia. Conclusion The pilot and subsequent expansion of the citizen reviewer role has created a new way to operationalize lived experiences within the research funding process. While requiring significant upfront work, the value of real-life experience in prioritizing research is unparalleled.

Why citizen review might beat peer review at identifying pursuitworthy scientific research – ScienceDirect

“Highlights

 

• Citizen review should be considered alongside peer review and lotteries as a method for allocating scientific grants.
• Drawing grant reviews from the lay population may do better at identifying pursuitworthy research than peer review does.
• Citizen review also improves trust in science and science communication.”

 

Eight components for ‘open social science’ – An agenda for cultural change | British Politics and Policy at LSE

“The open science movement has been gathering force in STEM disciplines for many years, and some of its procedural elements have been adopted also by quantitative social scientists. However, little work has yet been done on exploring how more ambitious open science principles might be deployed across both the qualitative and quantitative social science disciplines. Patrick Dunleavy sets out some initial ideas to foster a cultural shift towards open social science, explored in a current CIVICA project.”

How Online Citizen Science Games Could Bring More Diversity to the Research Industry

“Philanthropy and foreign aid are meant to transform socioeconomic-political systems, not just provide charity to those in need. In this vein, citizen science games are creating a new model for how to conduct scientific research while also promoting open science, where advancements are freely shared….”

Eight components for ‘open social science’ – An agenda for cultural change | Impact of Social Sciences

“The open science movement has been gathering force in STEM disciplines for many years, and some of its procedural elements have been adopted also by quantitative social scientists. However, little work has yet been done on exploring how more ambitious open science principles might be deployed across both the qualitative and quantitative social science disciplines. Patrick Dunleavy sets out some initial ideas to foster a cultural shift towards open social science, explored in a current CIVICA project….”

What Is Engaged Scholarship and How Can It Improve Your Research? | Rethinking Research

“Community-engaged scholarship is increasingly viewed as a valuable strategy for strengthening the quality and impact of academic research. This approach involves partnering with relevant groups or communities—those who are the focus of a research study or who may be directly affected by its findings—over the course of a research project. It represents a departure from the traditional top-down, ivory tower approach to research, in which the community is held at arm’s length and the scholar is considered the expert.

There are a number of approaches to integrating communities into the research process, including holistic methods such as community-based participatory research and participatory action research. By meaningfully incorporating community perspectives and guidance, the belief is that better research questions will be asked, more appropriate methodological strategies will be used and research findings will be more accurately interpreted and applied.

What does community-engaged scholarship look like in practice? And why should researchers invest in this type of scholarship?”

Three crowdsourcing opportunities with the British Library | Digital scholarship blog @ BL

Digital Curator Dr Mia Ridge writes, In case you need a break from whatever combination of weather, people and news is around you, here are some ways you can entertain yourself (or the kids!) while helping make collections of the British Library more findable, or help researchers understand our past. You might even learn something or make new discoveries along the way!

Perspectives on Open Science and The Future of Scholarly Communication: Internet Trackers and Algorithmic Persuasion | Research Metrics and Analytics

The current digital content industry is heavily oriented towards building platforms that track users’ behaviour and seek to convince them to stay longer and come back sooner onto the platform. Similarly, authors are incentivised to publish more and to become champions of dissemination. Arguably, these incentive systems are built around public reputation supported by a system of metrics, hard to be assessed. Generally, the digital content industry is permeable to non-human contributors (algorithms that are able to generate content and reactions), anonymity and identity fraud. It is pertinent to present a perspective paper about early signs of track and persuasion in scholarly communication. Building our views, we have run a pilot study to determine the opportunity for conducting research about the use of “track and persuade” technologies in scholarly communication. We collected observations on a sample of 148 relevant websites and we interviewed 15 that are experts related to the field. Through this work, we tried to identify 1) the essential questions that could inspire proper research, 2) good practices to be recommended for future research, and 3) whether citizen science is a suitable approach to further research in this field. The findings could contribute to determining a broader solution for building trust and infrastructure in scholarly communication. The principles of Open Science will be used as a framework to see if they offer insights into this work going forward.

Citizen Science Skilling for Library Staff, Researchers, and the Public, published by the LIBER Citizen Science Working Group

Part of the four part book series: Citizen Science for Research Libraries — A Guide

Section Editor Jitka Stilund Hansen

#CS4RL

An open access and peer-reviewed book. © 2021 the authors. Licensed Creative Commons: Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0), unless otherwise stated.

ISBN Print: 978-87-94233-59-0
ISBN eBook: 978-87-94233-60-6

DOI: https://doi.org/10.25815/hf0m-2a57

A practical guide designed to assist those organising and participating in a citizen science project to get the most out of the experience. The guide will enable you to have the skills to ensure a project is well set up from the start, is able to communicate to its stakeholders and citizens, manage its data and outputs, and overall ensure research benefits. The guide has been compiled by the LIBER Citizen Science Working Group and pulls on the generous contributions of the open science community.

Using citizen science data to monitor the Sustainable Development Goals: a bottom?up analysis – CS Track

“This research explores whether citizen science data could be used to improve the monitoring of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). By investigating this issue from the perspective of citizen science, this research finds that citizen science projects see both valuable opportunities as well as deep-rooted barriers in linking their data to the SDGs….”