PKP’s free and open source software (FOSS) version 3.4 for OJS, OMP & OPS: A sneak-peek – Public Knowledge Project

“PKP released development updates in December. In advance of releasing the Open Journal Systems (OJS), Open Monograph Press (OMP), and Open Preprint Systems (OPS) software in version 3.4 this year, the PKP team offers a sneak-peek of what to expect, why they are most excited for the community, and some personal insights from their own work on the Project….”

Recalibrating the Scope of Scholarly Publishing: A Modest Step in a Vast Decolonization Process | Quantitative Science Studies | MIT Press

Abstract:  By analyzing 25,671 journals largely absent from common journal counts, as well as Web of Science and Scopus, this study demonstrates that scholarly communication is more of a global endeavor than is commonly credited. These journals, employing the open source publishing platform Open Journal Systems (OJS), have published 5.8 million items; they are in 136 countries, with 79.9% in the Global South and 84.2% following the OA diamond model (charging neither reader nor author). A substantial proportion of journals operate in more than one language (48.3%), with research published in a total of 60 languages (led by English, Indonesian, Spanish, and Portuguese). The journals are distributed across the social sciences (45.9%), STEM (40.3%), and the humanities (13.8%). For all their geographic, linguistic, and disciplinary diversity, 1.2% are indexed in the Web of Science and 5.7% in Scopus. On the other hand, 1.0% are found in Cabells Predatory Reports, while 1.4% show up in Beall’s questionable list. This paper seeks to both contribute and historically situate expanded scale and diversity of scholarly publishing in the hope that this recognition may assist humankind in taking full advantage of what is increasingly a global research enterprise.

 

Job: Software Developer (PHP). End of play: Dec 12, 2022 | tsv.fi

The Federation of Finnish Learned Societies is looking to employ a Software Developer (PHP) to work in a three-year EU-funded project starting from February 1, 2023 or on agreement.

We are looking to employ a Software Developer to work on a PHP-based open source publishing system. The Federation of Finnish Learned Societies maintains nationally significant services for open publishing in Finland.

You will participate in an international EU-funded project which aims to advance the European infrastructure for open access publishing. Besides the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies, the project includes around twenty other European organizations. You will take part in developing a platform called Open Journal Systems intended for managing and publishing scholarly journals and will work with other project partners and the Public Knowledge Project (PKP), which leads the developer community of the system.

Tasks include:

Designing, documenting and developing new features for Open Journal Systems based on the goals set in the project
Presenting the results of the work in project meetings
Collaborating with the project partners and the developer community

Requirements:

University degree in computer science or other related field
Very good knowledge of PHP and relational databases
Knowledge of HTML, CSS and Javascript
Experience in maintenance of web applications
Good knowledge of English
Ability to work responsibly in a team and independently

Desirable:

Experience in software development projects and international projects
Familiar with Laravel, Vue.js, XML, Git and Github
Knowledge of scientific publishing and software used for scientific publishing, especially Open Journal Systems
Knowledge of Finnish (not required)

The position is for a fixed-term of three years starting from February 1, 2023 or on agreement. The probationary period is 6 months. The office of the Federation of Finnish Learned Societies is located at Kirkkokatu 6, 00170 Helsinki, Finland. We also offer flexible options for remote work.

The salary, based on the general collective agreement for the private teaching sector in Finland, is 3800–4000 €/month, depending on  how the requirements for the position are met.

 

The PDF is not enough: why science needs open formats – University Library

“In the project period from 2019 to 2021 , the project bundled modern publishing as part of the Hamburg Open Science (HOS) initiativeMany years of experience at the Hamburg University of Technology (TUHH) and the Hamburg State and University Library (SUB). The goal: The development of a socio-technical system for single source publishing, i.e. for generating different output formats from one source format. It was based on open source solutions such as GitLab and Open Journal Systems (OJS) to enable an open alternative approach to the publication of scientific results compared to commercial and proprietary publishing offers….

Former team members of the project have created the Single Source Publishing Community (SSPC)founded. This focuses on scientific writing and publishing with open tools and formats and is a meeting point for researchers, lecturers, publishers and developers. Under the motto “Collaborate more, compete less”, the active members of the community exchange ideas in their monthly meetingson current developments in their projects and discuss strategies for cultural change in the field of scientific publication….

Numerous open-source tools favor the desired sovereignty: software projects such as Open Journal Systems, Viviliostyle, Paged.js, Swapfire , FidusWriter, HedgeDoc, quartoand last but not least pandocare combined in different ways in the community projects to create alternative open systems.

Many projects use the Markdown format as a source, to generate complementary versions of PDF in the form of HTML, JATS/XMLand create EPUB. The latter offer the advantage that they retain the semantic labeling of the information they contain and thus open up a wide range of possible applications in automated text mining processes. At the same time, the usability and reach of published scientific findings increases….”

Bringing efficiencies to tens of thousands of journals: The role of Open Source | PUBMET

Abstract:  In addition to the growing number of scholarly journals published by the so-called “big five”, there are tens of thousands of journals that are published by individual scholars or by academic institutions. These smaller operations are a source of great bibliodiversity that deserves to be encouraged but can also be seen as inefficiencies in the system as a whole. The use of a common software—Open Journal Systems (OJS)—is helping these journals take advantage of an economy of scale without needing to centralize or homogenize them. The key to promoting both efficiency and bibliodiversity is in OJS’s open source nature. This presentation will describe the ways in which PKP’s open source software is bringing efficacy to journal operations, to the discovery of their content, and, in the best of cases, to supporting a transformation of the system as a whole.

 

Recalibrating the Scope of Scholarly Publishing: A Modest Step in a Vast Decolonization Process | SciELO Preprints

Khanna , S., Ball, J., Alperin, J. P., & Willinsky, J. (2022). Recalibrating the Scope of Scholarly Publishing: A Modest Step in a Vast Decolonization Process. In SciELO Preprints. https://doi.org/10.1590/SciELOPreprints.4729

Abstract: By analyzing 25,671 journals largely absent from journal counts and indexes, this study demonstrates that scholarly communication is more of a global endeavor than is commonly credited. These journals, employing the open source publishing platform Open Journal Systems (OJS), have published 5.8 million items and represent 136 countries, with 79.9 percent publishing in the Global South and 84.2 percent following the OA diamond model (charging neither reader nor author). More than half (54.6 percent) of the journals operate in more than one language, while publishing research in 60 languages (led by English, Indonesian, Spanish, and Portuguese). The journals are distributed across the social sciences (45.9 percent), STEM (40.3 percent), and the humanities (13.8 percent). For all their geographic, linguistic, and disciplinary diversity, the Web of Science indexes 1.2 percent of the journals and Scopus 5.7 percent. On the other hand, Cabells Predatory Reports includes 1.0 percent of the journals, while Beall lists 1.4 percent of them as predatory. A recognition of the expanded scope and scale of scholarly publishing will help ensure that humankind takes full advantage of what is increasingly a global research enterprise.

 

Guide to Plan S compliance in OJS

“For cOAlition S funded research covered by Plan S requirements, all peer-reviewed scholarly articles must be published in venues that fulfil the “Requirements for Publication Venues.” Individual publication venues (such as journals publishing on OJS) are responsible for ensuring that they meet these requirements. Journals that do not meet these requirements will not be suitable for scholarly articles resulting from cOAlition S-funded research.

Many of the Plan S requirements for publication venues represent best practices for quality, discoverability, and interoperability in scholarly publishing. We recommend that journals adopt these practices regardless of whether they intend to publish scholarly articles resulting from Coalition S-funded research….

This guide is intended for journals published on OJS which intend to meet the Requirements for Publication Venues articulated by Plan S under Part III: Technical Guidance and Requirements. This guide is modelled around the Plan S requirements, with sections of this guide mirroring the sections (1.1 and 1.2) of the Plan S requirements. The guide provides specific recommendations for implementing the requirements in OJS. Where suitable we have linked to other PKP documentation and guidance which provides additional details on the implementation of specific features and specifications.

While we will do our best to keep this guide up-to-date, the Plan S documentation should be relied upon for the most current and detailed information….”

$10M to support open-access and open-source research | UdeMNouvelles

“By awarding a $10-million grant to Coalition Publica through the Major Science Initiatives Fund 2023-2029, the Canada Foundation for Innovation is helping to address the ongoing need to operate and maintain research facilities of national importance, enabling Canadian researchers to undertake activities that rival those of their international colleagues.

Coalition Publica is developing an open, non-commercial infrastructure for digital research, dissemination and scholarly publication in the humanities and social sciences. The infrastructure is based on the complementarity of two leading technology solutions dedicated to open access and open science.

The first of those solutions is the erudit.org dissemination platform of the Érudit Consortium of Université de Montréal (UdeM), Université Laval and Université du à Montréal, while the second is the Open Journal Systems editing and publishing software developed by the Public Knowledge Project at Simon Fraser University….”

Canada Foundation for Innovation renews its support for Coalition Publica | 19 August 2022

“Coalition Publica will strengthen its digital services to the Canadian and international scholarly community with continued investment from CFI. The Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) is awarding a $10 million grant to Coalition Publica under the Major Science Initiatives Fund 2023-2029. Through this program, CFI contributes to the ongoing operation and maintenance needs of research facilities of national importance in order to enable Canadian researchers to undertake world-class research. Coalition Publica is developing an open, non-commercial infrastructure for digital research, dissemination, and scholarly publishing. It is based on the complementarity between the publishing software Open Journal Systems, developed by the Public Knowledge Project (Simon Fraser University (SFU)), and the erudit.org dissemination platform of the Érudit Consortium (Université de Montréal, Université Laval, Université du Québec à Montréal), two leading technological solutions dedicated to open access and open science. In collaboration with the editorial teams of more than 250 scholarly and cultural journals, Coalition Publica also offers access to the largest corpus of Canadian research results in the humanities and social sciences. More than 220,000 publications are available, and 8,000 new articles are disseminated each year. Rich and diverse, the collections are representative of Canadian and international research and creation: archaeology, economics, history, literary studies, psychology, education… They are consulted each year by nearly 6 million users worldwide….”

eScholarship Pilots New Technologies – California Digital Library

“The University of California’s open access publishing program and institutional repository, eScholarship, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. As part of this celebration of the many ways eScholarship has enabled UC affiliated scholars and editors to openly share their research and publications with the world over the past two decades, we’ve taken some time to examine the nuts and bolts of our services, which have grown organically as we’ve expanded and adapted to support the changing needs of the scholarly community and the reading public.  Looking under the hood, we find that, while eScholarship is still a powerful and flexible platform, the underlying technology is somewhat outdated, with many bespoke core components.  

Looking ahead, the eScholarship team is eager to address this issue of aging and idiosyncratic technology by engaging more fully with leading open source, community-based solutions–both as a consumer of and contributor to these efforts. This desire has motivated our participation in an exciting new initiative, the Next Generation Library Publishing Project (NGLP), funded by Arcadia and focused on building interoperable tools to connect widely adopted, open source platforms and services.  With library publishers specifically in mind, NGLP has created discovery, access, administrative, and analytics/reporting layers designed to work with powerful applications like the journal publishing platforms Janeway and OJS, and the repository platform DSpace–providing combined publishing and institutional repository solutions. The project is currently piloting this modular technology approach to gather feedback from stakeholders.

As one of the pilot partners, CDL is excited to engage the eScholarship community in evaluating this early iteration of a next generation publishing and institutional repository solution. We will host a series of webinars throughout July demonstrating an early version of the NGLP stack, configured for and populated with journal and repository data from two UC campuses. Participants will be able to tour and interact with the pilot implementation, including journal and repository submission workflows and the NGLP Web Delivery Platform (WDP), the last of which provides a unified display layer across multiple content platforms. We will be particularly focused on the presentation of content and related publishing entities, in order to learn what our stakeholders find compelling, confusing, and where the gaps are at this early stage. This feedback will be shared with the NGLP project team as they work to build out a fully realized offering. …”

eScholarship pilots new technologies – Office of Scholarly Communication

“The University of California’s open access publishing program and institutional repository, eScholarship, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. As part of this celebration of the many ways eScholarship has enabled UC affiliated scholars and editors to openly share their research and publications with the world over the past two decades, we’ve taken some time to examine the nuts and bolts of our services, which have grown organically as we’ve expanded and adapted to support the changing needs of the scholarly community and the reading public.  Looking under the hood, we find that, while eScholarship is still a powerful and flexible platform, the underlying technology is somewhat outdated, with many bespoke core components.  

Looking ahead, the eScholarship team is eager to address this issue of aging and idiosyncratic technology by engaging more fully with leading open source, community-based solutions–both as a consumer of and contributor to these efforts. This desire has motivated our participation in an exciting new initiative, the Next Generation Library Publishing Project (NGLP), funded by Arcadia and focused on building interoperable tools to connect widely adopted, open source platforms and services.  With library publishers specifically in mind, NGLP has created discovery, access, administrative, and analytics/reporting layers designed to work with powerful applications like the journal publishing platforms Janeway and OJS, and the repository platform DSpace–providing combined publishing and institutional repository solutions. The project is currently piloting this modular technology approach to gather feedback from stakeholders….

The Public Knowledge Project’s Open Monograph Press

While much progress has been made by academic libraries, societies, and groups of scholars in supporting the publication of independent journals, giving rise to the Open Access Diamond Journal phenomenon (no charge for authors or readers), the same is not true of books.1  Scholarly books would appear to require a publishing house to produce such works.  Well, in that regard, Open Monograph Press (OMP) offers a publishing house in a box.  Only there is no box.  And the house is virtual, but within it one can see the scholarly book through to publication.

It’s Time to Upgrade OJS | Public Knowledge Project

“We encourage users to upgrade to the current release series OJS 3.3.x!

More than 25,000 active journals around the world use Open Journal Systems (OJS). However, the PKP Technical Committee recently learned that many of those journals are relying on considerably older  versions of OJS. As we are regularly releasing upgrades of the software, given changes to the web, staying with older versions may pose problems for a journal’s stability and security . For example, more than 8,000 journals are using OJS 2.4 – a version that PKP has now retired. …”

 

EIFL checklist for using OJS in journal publishing | EIFL

We have updated and revised the EIFL checklist of good practices in using the free and open software Open Journal System (OJS) for journal editing and publishing. OJS is the most widely used publishing software in EIFL partner countries.

The checklist, by Iryna Kuchma, Manager of the EIFL Open Access Programme, takes forward a key goal of EIFL – to ensure the growth and sustainability of digital repositories and journal publishing platforms. 

OJS is created by the Public Knowledge Project (PKP), which is a multi-university initiative developing free and open source software to improve the quality and reach of scholarly publishing.

This is the second version of the checklist. It includes more details about the current production release of software – OJS 3, and tips on organizational identifiers plugin, DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) registration, copyright and licensing, the PKP Project Preservation Network and journal content accessibility. And we’ve updated the ‘further reading’ list.