N8 Research Partnership – Statement on Rights Retention

“The N8 Research Partnership represents the research-intensive universities of the North of England. 12% of all UK academics work at N8 universities as well as almost 200,000 students. The N8 is one of the strongest regional academic consortia in the UK and believes the time is now right to make a coordinated statement on the rights held by our academics over their research….

. In order to achieve this third route to open access researchers need to be able to apply a CC BY licence and place their accepted manuscript in an institutional or other preferred repository. This must now be done without embargo granted to any publisher….”

N8 Research Partnership stands up for researchers with new Rights Retention statement – N8 Research Partnership

“The N8 – which represents 12% of all UK academics and 200,000 students – has released a statement outlining its new stance on the importance of researchers being able to obtain their original rights when their work is published in a journal. The statement was launched at an event held at the University of Manchester’s John Rylands Library, with speakers including the N8’s new chair Professor Charlie Jeffrey and Professor Dame Nancy Rothwell, president and vice-chancellor of the University of Manchester. 

In April 2022, UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) made it mandatory for all research published in journals to be made immediately available via Open Access or transformative Gold journals’ APC charges or through journals released on a transitional Read & Publish deal without APC charges. Open access can also be achieved via depositing the author accepted manuscript and making it available without embargo. 

However, in order to achieve this third route to open access researchers need to be able to apply a CC BY license – which allows anyone to make commercial use of the work under the condition of attributing the research in the manner specified by the author or licensor – and place their accepted manuscript in an institutional or other preferred repository. This must now be done without embargo granted to any publisher. 

However, some publishers are no longer compliant with several not accepting that a researcher’s original rights should be retained by them, meaning that publishers may not accept manuscripts where an application has been made for a CC BY license and the researcher has clearly stated that they own their research.  

The N8’s statement – which has been coordinated through the eight universities’ PVCs for Research, Research Offices, Legal Departments and Libraries – reflects the shared conviction of the importance of researchers retaining their rights.  

Each N8 university will have its own position which may supersede the publisher’s requirements, but ultimately if a researcher is able to publish via an APC to a Gold journal or in a journal covered by a Read & Publish deal then researchers do not need to assert their rights.  

However, the N8 statement strongly recommends that researchers do not by default transfer intellectual property rights to publishers and do use a Rights Retention statement as standard practice….”

Supporting open access publishing for books: myth-busting webinars event summary – Research

“As part of our work with UKRI to support the implementation of the UKRI open access policy for monographs, book chapters and edited collections published from 1 January 2024, we re-visited some of the key areas of concern for researchers that surfaced during the consultation period for the policy (see UUK Open access and monographs. Evidence review and Open access and monographs: Where are we now? A position paper by the British Academy).

There was a clear need for a focused period of engagement with key stakeholder groups such as researchers/academics across all career levels, librarians/scholarly communication managers, research offices, and rights holders, with the aim being to split the real issues from the perceived problems. As a result, we collaborated with a number of UK university presses and the Open Access Books Network to hold a series of webinars on the subject of the myths around open access for books, as well as to address legitimate concerns and suggest ways to remove barriers to open access publishing.

We held three 90-minute webinars, each consisting of three short presentations from a panel including authors, publishers, open access publishing support services and policy makers. These were then followed by a Q&A session where audience questions were invited. All sessions were chaired by an expert in the field of open access.

The opening session set the context and covered the key themes, and this was then followed by more focused sessions covering specific areas in more detail. You can find all the event recordings, transcripts, presentations, and our panels’ responses to the questions we didn’t have time to cover on our Events webpage and also via the links below….”

Open access in scholarly publishing: Where are we now? | Research Information

“Notably, 2023 marks a decade since two important events. Not only David Bowie’s return to releasing records, but Research Councils UK’s (the predecessor to UKRI) launch of its open access policy. This was a watershed moment for UK research, a clear statement of intent to make open access a full-scale reality. But 10 years on, it is pertinent to ask, where are we now?…

In fact, 2022 certainly witnessed a continuing paradigm shift, particularly UKRI’s open access policy coming into effect for articles and conference proceedings. This represents a step-change to full and immediate open access for publicly funded research, and essentially incorporates Plan S into the UK research landscape. Similar policies have been launched by other funders, including the National Institute for Health & Care Research and Cancer Research UK. 

 

Moreover, 2022 saw the release of the Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021 results, marking another milestone for open access. REF 2021’s open access mandate for journal articles and conference proceedings has arguably had the greatest impact in driving open access engagement by researchers. What was once a niche pursuit that was opposed by many researchers is now overwhelmingly regarded as an everyday part of the research lifecycle. There is a growing sense of positive engagement too, with researchers increasingly publishing open access because they want to and not just because they have to….”

Open access for book chapters: event summary – Research

“Long form scholarly works, such as monographs, book chapters and edited collections, will become in scope of the new UKRI open access policy if published after 1 January 2024. UKRI is developing a dedicated fund to support these new requirements.

A variety of publishing models already exist to help cover the cost of publishing open access. However, many publishers have already introduced the Chapter Processing Charge (CPC) as their preferred publishing model, and similarly to the Book Processing Charge (BPC) model, there are concerns that the CPC model will not scale with this limited fund….

The inclusion of book chapters in the UKRI open access policy raises a number of issues that must be resolved prior to policy launch:

Where book chapters contain a UKRI funder acknowledgement, but the edited works that they are contained within do not, the individual book chapters must be made open access (OA) within 12 months of publication. This applies to each chapter, if more than one chapter acknowledges funding
If the whole edited work acknowledges funding, then the policy applies to the whole book, even if book chapters acknowledge different UKRI funding
Chapters in edited works from born OA publishers and those made OA via a subscribe to open or community driven (diamond) models would be compliant…”

University of Leeds Publications Policy – Research and Innovation Service

“Author requirements

Authors must comply with their funders’ policies relating to open access and research data management. 
Authors must register for an individual ORCiD identifier and should link it to their University Publications Database profile [2], include it on any personal webpage, when submitting publications, when applying for grants, and in any research workflow to ensure that the individual is credited for their work and that the correct institutional affiliation is achieved.  
Authors must use a standardised institutional affiliation “University of Leeds” in all research outputs to ensure clear affiliation with the University of Leeds. 
Authors must specify authors’ contributions in all research outputs to ensure individuals’ roles are identifiable and duly recognised. 
Authors must include a Data Access Statement in all research outputs even where there are no data associated with the publication or the data are inaccessible. The statement informs readers where the associated underlying research materials are available and how they can be accessed.  
Authors must acknowledge the source of grant funding associated with a research output in all research outputs. Information about the grant should also be linked, by the author, to the record of the publication in the University Publications Database. Grant information in the University Publications Database is fed automatically from the University’s Grant Information System [3].  
Authors must retain the necessary rights to make the accepted manuscripts of research articles, including reviews and conference papers, publicly available under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence. Recommended wording to include in manuscript submissions is in Appendix 1. This requirement does not apply but is strongly recommended for outputs solely or jointly authored by PGRs (only).  
Authors must record bibliographic details of all research outputs in the University’s publications database. For peer-reviewed research articles, including reviews and conference papers, this must be done as soon as possible after acceptance for publication. When creating the record in the University’s publications database, complete the appropriate fields to confirm that a data access and a rights retention statement have been added to the output itself. 
Authors must deposit full text copies of final accepted peer-reviewed research articles, including reviews and conference papers into the institutional repository, via the University’s publications database as soon as possible after acceptance for publication. Where the output is already available open access via the publisher website a link may be provided instead. The deposit of other outputs e.g. monographs is also encouraged where copyright permits. 
Where copyright allows and there are no confidentiality or commercial constraints, the research outputs in the institutional repository must be made ‘open access’, i.e. freely accessible over the internet. 
Outputs must be made open access as soon as possible after acceptance [4]….”

New Publications Policy makes rights retention a must | Library | University of Leeds

“A new publications policy takes effect from 1 January 2023.

A major update to the University’s Publications Policy will help authors to follow good open research practices. The policy also supports authors to retain intellectual property rights in their work.

Until recently, open research practices have focused on making journal articles openly accessible. Now open access is seen as one part of the wider open research movement, which considers a broader range of research outputs. One key aim is to make more outputs immediately available so that everyone can benefit from access to the most recent research….

The updated Publications Policy features three new author requirements:

Authors must identify all contributors in all roles in all research outputs.
This aligns with research culture initiatives to make sure all contributions are valued and recognised.
Authors must include a Data Access Statement in all research outputs, even when there are no data associated with the publication or the data are inaccessible. The statement says where the associated research materials are available and how they can be accessed.
This enables compliance with the UKRI open access policy.
Authors must retain the necessary rights to make the accepted manuscripts of research articles publicly available under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence. This includes reviews and conference papers….”

UKRI Infrastructure Advisory Committee – UKRI

“UKRI is seeking up to 3 members from across UKRI’s stakeholder groups to join the Infrastructure Advisory Committee which provides advice and guidance on long term infrastructure investment priorities and prioritisation of investments.

We are seeking senior level expert members with a strong interest and experience in research and innovation infrastructure planning or delivery, deep expertise in their professional area, and an ability to think strategically beyond their discipline.

We would particularly welcome applications from individuals with a background in arts and social sciences, innovation, international infrastructure prioritisation, or those from groups currently under-represented at senior levels in the research and innovation community….”

Publishing in transformative journals to make your research openly available | Jisc

“Transformative journals are a key route to open access. Jisc is negotiating with publishers on behalf of the sector to ensure that their journals are funder compliant. This guide will show researchers how they can publish their research open access in a transformative journal in order to meet funding requirements.  …”

Subject analysis of routes to compliance for UKRI funded authors

As part of our work to support the implementation of the new UKRI Open Access policy, we have rapidly scaled up our negotiations and are now working with over 300 publishers (and have confirmed compliance of 100 more) across a broad range of subject areas using a range of open access publishing routes. The aim is to make it easy for authors to increase the reach and impact of their research, and to comply with UKRI, and other research funders’, open access (OA) policies.

We carry out detailed analysis of previous publishing patterns of UKRI funded authors and assign each journal a route to compliance category (Table 1). For journals that are non-compliant or ineligible for UKRI funds we then evaluate the gaps between the publisher’s existing publication routes and the UKRI OA policy requirements, and we work with these publishers to secure UKRI compliant agreements. All our negotiations with publishers are sector-led and designed to meet both sector and funder requirements.

Open access policy update: December 2022 | STM Publishing News

“UKRI has published updated information to support funded research organisations and researchers to meet its new open access policy.

Peer reviewed research articles that acknowledge UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) funding have been required to comply with UKRI’s open access policy since 1 April 2022.

From 1 January 2024, monographs, book chapters and edited collections that acknowledge UKRI funding will also need to be published open access….”

Five principles for monitoring and evaluation: The case of UKRI’s Open Access policy | Research Consulting

by Andrea Chiarelli

Between August and November 2022, almost 80 individuals from across the research and publishing landscape contributed to a study we delivered on behalf of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), to support the development of a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework for their Open Access (OA) policy.

The framework will help UKRI and the sector assess open access progress, levels of compliance with the policy and its effectiveness. It will also seek to establish insights into open access publication trends across the UK and, where possible, their impact on academic practices and society.

We are in the process of finalising project outputs for public dissemination alongside our associates Bianca Kramer and Cameron Neylon, but we are now in a position to share some high-level findings and next steps. This blog covers five key principles we identified from our discussions with the research and publishing communities, as well as considering the implications for UKRI’s future M&E efforts.

 

Open access Policy Update: December 2022 – UKRI

UKRI has published updated information to support funded research organisations and researchers to meet its new open access policy.

Peer reviewed research articles that acknowledge UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) funding have been required to comply with UKRI’s open access policy since 1 April 2022.

From 1 January 2024, monographs, book chapters and edited collections that acknowledge UKRI funding will also need to be published open access.

UKRI signs Agreement on Reforming Research Assessment – UKRI

“Reward and recognition are central to the UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) strategy commitment of fostering a world-class research and innovation system and UKRI has already made significant progress in this area.

The Agreement on Reforming Research Assessment represents another step forward, with UKRI committing to a common vision for the assessment of research, researchers and research organisations.

Assessment must recognise the diverse outputs, practices and activities that maximise the quality and impact of research and be based primarily on qualitative judgement.

Peer review is central this, supported by the responsible use of quantitative indicators….”

1Future Leadership Fellows discuss open research with UKRI and UKRN

“On 12 October, UKRI convened several hundred Future Leaders Fellows in Birmingham. The UKRI open research team and the UK Reproducibility Network brought together some of those Fellows in two special interest session s to discuss open and transparent research . H ere we summarise the perspectives a nd ideas that we heard from the Fellows, who work in a range of disciplines and have engaged with open research in a variety of ways . Where we are aware of related work, we note this [in square brackets]….”