Publishing in hybrid, open access journals | Press release | Wellcome

“Wellcome has updated its guidance for researchers to help them comply with our open access policy and support them when some journals have discouraged them from making their Author Accepted Manuscripts open access….

‘We are disappointed that some publishers are implementing processes that seek to discourage our researchers from exercising their right to make their Author Accepted Manuscript (AAM) open access. We urge these publishers to stop these practices and instead focus their efforts on developing Plan S-aligned publishing options. 

‘Where publishers embrace this transition, we will fund fair and reasonable publishing costs. Moreover, under this model, the Version of Record will be made open access, and as such the author will not need to make use of their right to share the AAM.

 

‘In the meantime, when faced with an obligation to agree pay an Article Processing Charge (which we will not fund) we encourage our researchers to either contact the journal to request a waiver to this fee, or to consider submitting their manuscript to a different journal. …”

Research Data Management

“The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) (the agencies) are pleased to announce the launch of the Tri-Agency Research Data Management Policy. The agencies would like to thank the stakeholders and partners who contributed to the policy’s development….

The policy includes requirements related to institutional research data management (RDM) strategies, data management plans (DMPs), and data deposit. It is aligned with the data deposit requirement in the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications (2015), CIHR’s Health Research and Health-Related Data Framework (2017), the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans—TCPS 2 (2018), and the agencies’ Setting new directions to support Indigenous research and research training in Canada 2019-2022 (2019)….”

Has the pandemic changed public attitudes about science? | Impact of Social Sciences

“At a structural level, the public faith in science’s trustworthiness and value can also be ‘future proofed’ through ongoing initiatives to make scientific research open and transparent, enhanced efforts to ensure a more diverse and inclusive scientific workforce and other efforts to improve science from within. Initiatives working in this direction include increased adoption of open science policies by research funders and global public policy that promotes more socially responsible research and innovation. Indeed, this moment of strong public support may be the perfect opportunity for long-needed structural reforms to make research more socially responsible and sustainable. In other words, it’s time to fix the roof while the sun is shining!”

How Europe’s €100-billion science fund will shape 7 years of research

“Horizon Europe is expected to mandate that grant recipients publish their results according to the principles of open science.

In particular, immediate open-access publishing will become mandatory for all recipients of Horizon Europe research grants, including those from the ERC, says Kütt. Scientists will be required to post an accepted, peer-reviewed version of their papers online at a ‘trusted repository’, according to a draft of the instructions for applicants, but it is unclear at this time which repositories will be acceptable. Grants will cover publishing costs for pure open-access journals, but not for hybrid publications. Authors must also retain intellectual-property rights for their papers….”

SPARC: Setting the Default to Open in Research and Education

“This is a community resource for tracking, comparing, and understanding current U.S. federal funder research data sharing policies. Originally completed by SPARC & Johns Hopkins University Libraries in 2016, the content of this resource was updated by RDAP and SPARC in 2021….”

Plan S and funding

This presentation was given by Johan Rooryck during the Open Access Talk on 29 October 2020. Johan Rooryck, Professor at Leiden University and Executive Director of cOAlition S, briefly outlines the rationale for the principles of Plan S. Beyond that, he discusses its implementation for all grants awarded by cOAlition S funders from 1 January 2021, including the Horizon Europe framework. In his talk, Johan Rooryck covers the following questions: Which conditions do you need to fulfil to publish in a journal of your choice under Plan S? What can the newly developed Journal Checker Tool do for you? How does the recent Rights Retention Strategy help you to keep the rights to your Author Accepted Manuscript? In addition, Johan Rooryck mentions a number of other projects initiated by cOAlition S, such as the Price Transparency Framework to ensure that prices for publishing services become more transparent and fair or the commission of a study to identify concrete funding mechanisms to support and strengthen diamond journals and their platforms. The lecture “Plan S and funding – What is going to change?” was held as part of the Open Access Talk online series of the BMBF-funded project open-access.network.

Economic Impact Assessment – Publishers Association

“The economic impact of a new Open Access (OA) policy from UK Research and Innovation Report (UKRI) is assessed in this report, produced by FTI Consulting.

The main focus of this exercise was to:

assess the impact of specific policy conditions that have been proposed for journal articles and long-form research publications (monographs), using the existing policy framework as a benchmark; 
consider the impact of the UKRI policy on different groups of stakeholders within the scholarly communications ecosystem;
understand the immediate economic impact of the proposed policy and how this might change in the future in light of industry trends; and
compare the impact of the policy proposals against UKRI’s stated policy objectives….”

Explaining the Rights Retention Strategy – The Scholarly Kitchen

“The Rights Retention Strategy is perhaps one of the most complicated pieces of the cOAlition’s policy regime. Unpacking each word — rights, retention, and strategy — is one approach to better understanding what this policy is and how it functions within the Plan S compliance framework overall. …”

Open Access Policy – Aligning Science Across Parkinson’s

“What are the publishing requirements of ASAP [Aligning Science Across Parkinson’s] and Plan S?

All ASAP-funded researchers will follow the basic tenets of OA publication set forth in Plan S, as follows:

Immediate free access: Peer-reviewed, author-accepted research must be made freely available immediately upon publication, without any embargo period (zero embargo).
Unrestricted reuse rights:

ASAP funded authors or their institutions must retain the copyright for their research articles unless they are published in the public domain.
Articles must be published under the Creative Commons Attribution license CC-BY 4.0, or under the CC0 license which does not require attribution, or equivalent. Both licenses permit reuse of the material without restriction….”

Open Access Mandates and Open Access Adoption – Delta Think

“As more funders implement or consider mandates, we were curious whether the data show any connection between funders’ open access policies and open access uptake….

Although both curves are broadly similar, it seems that they diverge in the detail. The number of OA policies grew faster than OA uptake around 2001 to 2017. But we have since seen a turnaround. The proportion of OA continues to increase apace, even though the numbers of policies have almost reached a steady state….

Are policies driving OA adoption?

At first glance: Yes. Clearly there is a strong overall correlation between numbers of policies and OA uptake.

However, correlation is not causation. Policies do not necessarily mandate actions. Different funders and institutions may apply different incentives to researchers. Policies take time to take effect – as we see with Plan S. And, while the longest-standing and most robust policies are likely to see highest compliance, compliance rates are highly variable.

Whatever the correlation with policy numbers, perhaps the OA market has taken on a life of its own. It continues to grow regardless of policy numbers and – in many cases – of policy strength. Anecdotally, we can say that many publishers view OA as “the direction of travel” and are increasing their OA options often in advance of mandates….

Our underlying data show repository-only articles hovering at a steady state of around 5% of annual output; with articles in gold fully OA journals driving the increase in OA uptake….”

Science Policy, Competition and Profits

How much India is spending on journal subscriptions? how difficult is it for Indians to access publicly funded research? A nationwide subscription proposal comes with a lot of financial and moral baggage. 

DFG – Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft – DFG setzt neue Akzente für Open Access

From Google’s English:  “The German Research Foundation (DFG) is stepping up its efforts to ensure free access to publications and other research results online. In order to support Open Access and adapt it to the changing requirements of science and research, the DFG has decided and implemented further measures. These are networked with one another and range from improved framework conditions to the financing of publication costs and the development of a science-appropriate publication infrastructure to participation in national and international working groups….

The DFG readjusted its open access policy in 2020. Scientists are now asked to publish results from DFG-funded research projects in open access. To achieve this goal, the DFG supports both the financing of publication fees and the development of suitable publication infrastructures with its funding programs.

With its “Open Access Publication Costs” program, which was introduced in autumn 2020, the DFG grants subsidies for publication fees. Both the fees for journal articles and for Open Access monographs can be funded. Many universities and non-university research institutions are faced with the financial challenge that publishers charge for the publication of research results in Open Access. The new program is intended to support the institutions and their scientists in the Open Access transformation.

 

In addition to funding publication fees, the various specialist communities in Germany are dependent on the further development of science-friendly standards and infrastructures. With the newly accentuated funding program “Infrastructures for Scientific Publishing” , the DFG supports the Open Access transformation by setting up and expanding suitable publication infrastructures and thus also promotes the (further) development of structural framework conditions for the publication system….”

Informationsplattform Open Access: DFG stärkt Engagement für Open Access

From Google’s English:  “The German Research Foundation (DFG) is taking promising measures to drive the Open Access transformation forward. In advance, she had revised her Open Access Policy: Researchers are now asked to publish DFG-funded results in Open Access.

In January 2021, the DFG will start its new Infrastructures for Scientific Publishing program , the main goals of which are to promote the Open Access transformation through the establishment and expansion of suitable publication infrastructures and the (further) development of structural framework conditions. As early as autumn 2020, the DFG introduced the Open Access Publication  Costs funding program, which subsidizes the publication fees for open access journal articles and monographs….”