EOSC Symposium 2022, Nov 14-17, 2022 @ Prague (CZ) & online | EOSC Association

The EOSC Symposium is the main EOSC annual event and this year takes place in Prague, Czech Republic, from 14th-17th November 2022.

Over 500 stakeholders from ministries, policy makers, research performing organisations, service providers, research infrastructures and research communities across Europe and beyond are expected to attend the Symposium to reflect on the EOSC key achievements and strategic challenges and to identify priorities and concrete actions at European, national, and institutional level to speed up the EOSC implementation.

 

During the Symposium, there will be an opportunity to inspire the EOSC community by sharing your work or ideas. Apply to the call for talks or sessions now! Deadline: Friday 23 September 2022, 17:00 CEST.

Call for talks: Submit a talk (the talk should not exceed 7 minutes) on the following topics:

FAIR enabling practices 
Use cases demonstrating the added value of EOSC
EOSC Core developments
EOSC Exchange & Data Federation developments
Federation of national Research Infrastructures & e-infrastructure in EOSC
Training & Skills for EOSC
Contributions of for profit partners to EOSC
Engaging stakeholders in EOSC

More information here.

Call for sessions: Submit ideas for a side session (max 90 minutes) or an evening session (up to 3 hours). Please note that there is a limited number of slots for sessions and the sessions might be running in parallel with the main programme of the Symposium.Please double check the draft structure of the event here. 

More information here.

The applications will be evaluated by the Programme Committee and the applicants will be notified on the week of the 3rd of October 2022.

 

Towards a European network of FAIR-enabling Trustworthy Digital Repositories (TDRs) – A Working Paper | Zenodo

Philipp Conzett, Ingrid Dillo, Francoise Genova, Natalie Harrower, Vasso Kalaitzi, Mari Kleemola, Amela Kurta, Pedro Principe, Olivier Rouchon, Hannes Thiemann, & Maaike Verburg. (2022). Towards a European network of FAIR-enabling Trustworthy Digital Repositories (TDRs) – A Working Paper (v2.0). Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7034315

Abstract: This working paper is a bottom-up initiative of  a group of stakeholders from the European repository community. Its purpose is to outline an aspirational vision of a European Network of FAIR-enabling Trustworthy Digital Repositories (TDRs). This initiative originates from the workshop entitled “Towards exploring the idea of establishing the Network”. The paper was created in close connection with the wider community, as its core was built on community feedback and the first draft of the paper was shared for community-wide consultation. This paper will serve as input for the EOSC Task Force on Long Term Digital Preservation. One of the core activities mentioned in the charter of this Task Force is to produce recommendations on the creation of such a network.

The working paper puts together a vision of how a European network of FAIR-enabling TDRs could be based on the community’s needs and its most important functions: Networking and knowledge exchange, stakeholder advocacy and engagement, and coordination and development. The specific activities hosted under these umbrella functions could address the wide range of topics that are important to TDRs. Beyond these functions and the challenges they address, the paper presents a framework to highlight aspects of the Network to further explore in the next steps of its development.

 

Analysis of Harvard Medical School Countway Library’s MOOC Course, Best Practices for Biomedical Research Data Management: Learner Demographics and Motivations

Abstract:  The Harvard Medical School Countway Library’s Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Best Practices for Biomedical Research Data Management launched on Canvas in January 2018. This report analyzes learner reported data and course generated analytics from March 2020 through June 2021 for the course. This analysis focuses on three subsets of participant data during the pandemic to understand global learner demographics and interest in biomedical research data management. 

Embracing the value of research data: introducing the JCHLA/JABSC Data Sharing Policy | Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association / Journal de l’Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada

Abstract:  As health sciences researchers have been asked to share their data more frequently due to funder policies, journal requirements, or interest from their peers, health sciences librarians (HSLs) have simultaneously begun to provide support to researchers in this space through training, participating in RDM efforts on research grants, and developing comprehensive data services programs. If supporting researchers’ data sharing efforts is a worthwhile investment for HSLs, it is crucial that we practice data sharing in our own research endeavours. sharing data is a positive step in the right direction, as it can increase the transparency, reliability, and reusability of HSL-related research outputs. Furthermore, having the ability to identify and connect with researchers in relation to the challenges associated with data sharing can help HSLs empathize with their communities and gain new perspectives on improving support in this area. To that end, the Journal of the Canadian Health Libraries Association / Journal de l’Association des bibliothèques de la santé du Canada (JCHLA / JABSC) has developed a Data Sharing Policy to improve the transparency and reusability of research data underlying the results of its publications. This paper will describe the approach taken to inform and develop this policy. 

 

NOT-OD-22-189: Implementation Details for the NIH Data Management and Sharing Policy

“The purpose of this notice is to inform the extramural research community of implementation details for the NIH Policy for Data Management and Sharing (DMS Policy) affecting grant and cooperative agreement applications submitted for receipt dates on or after January 25, 2023. The specific changes to competing grant and cooperative agreement application instructions clarified below will be implemented with application form packages identified with a Competition ID of “FORMS-H” and incorporated into the forthcoming FORMS-H application guides.

Although the DMS Policy will apply also to Research and Development (R&D) contracts, NIH intramural research projects, and other funding agreements (e.g., Other Transactions), the forms changes and other implementation details provided in this Notice apply only to NIH extramural grant and cooperative agreement activities. Details applicable to R&D contracts will be incorporated into the appropriate Requests for Proposals, and details applicable to Other Transactions will be incorporated into the appropriate Research Opportunity Announcement….”

Data Communities: Datenmanagement jenseits von generischen und fachspezifischen Perspektiven | Bausteine Forschungsdatenmanagement

Asef, Esther Marie, Elisabeth Huber, Sabine Imeri, Eva Ommert, Michaela Rizzolli, und Cosima Wagner. 2022. „Data Communities: Datenmanagement Jenseits Von Generischen Und Fachspezifischen Perspektiven: Erkenntnisse Aus Einem Workshop Im Rahmen Der FORGE 2021“. Bausteine Forschungsdatenmanagement, Nr. 2 (August). German:1-12. https://doi.org/10.17192/bfdm.2022.2.8434.

Die Frage, inwieweit Datenmanagement jenseits von entweder generischen oder fachspezifischen Perspektiven denkbar ist, stand im Mittelpunkt eines Workshops im Rahmen der FORGE 2021. Im Workshop wurde das Konzept der „Data Communities“ (Cooper und Springer 2019) vorgestellt, seine Potenziale mit Blick auf die Sozial- und Geisteswissenschaften diskutiert und anschließend eruiert, welche strategischen wie operativen Kriterien sich daraus für forschungsadäquat unterstützende Datenmanagement-Services ableiten lassen. Der Beitrag fasst die wichtigsten Erkenntnisse aus dem Workshop zusammen und diskutiert, wie das bestehende Konzept um spezifisch sozial- und geisteswissenschaftliche Aspekte erweitert werden könnte.

European Commission signs first grant agreements under Horizon Europe | European Research Executive Agency

The European Commission recently signed grant agreements with 49 projects that successfully applied to Horizon Europe: Reforming and Enhancing the European R&I System and Research Infrastructures.  

Find out more about these two funding opportunities and the upcoming projects below.   

Reforming and Enhancing the European R&I System 

Reforming the European R&I System is part of the Horizon Europe’s Widening participation and strengthening the European Research Area call (Destination 3). 

Call for funding opened on 08 June 2021 and closed on 23 September 2021. 

Out of the 44 applications received, 20 projects covering 15 topics were funded, for a total of about 50.5 million euros of European Commission contribution. 

Projects start between June 2022 and September 2022.

Find below an overview of the selected projects per call topic(s)/type(s) of action:

[…]

Ten simple rules for maximizing the recommendations of the NIH data management and sharing plan | PLOS Computational Biology

Abstract:  The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Policy for Data Management and Sharing (DMS Policy) recognizes the NIH’s role as a key steward of United States biomedical research and information and seeks to enhance that stewardship through systematic recommendations for the preservation and sharing of research data generated by funded projects. The policy is effective as of January 2023. The recommendations include a requirement for the submission of a Data Management and Sharing Plan (DMSP) with funding applications, and while no strict template was provided, the NIH has released supplemental draft guidance on elements to consider when developing a plan. This article provides 10 key recommendations for creating a DMSP that is both maximally compliant and effective.

 

Recognizing Our Collective Responsibility in the Prioritization of Open Data Metrics · Issue 4.3, Summer 2022

Abstract:  With the rise in data-sharing policies, development of supportive infrastructure, and the amount of data published over the last decades, evaluation and assessment are increasingly necessary to understand the reach, impact, and return on investment of data-sharing practices. As biomedical research stakeholders prepare for the implementation of the updated National Institutes of Health (NIH) Data Management and Sharing Policy in 2023, it is essential that the development of responsible, evidence-based open data metrics are prioritized. If the community is not mindful of our responsibility in building for assessment upfront, there are prominent risks to the advancement of open data-sharing practices: failing to live up to the policy’s goals, losing community ownership of the open data landscape, and creating disparate incentive systems that do not allow for researcher reward. These risks can be mitigated if the community recognizes data as its own scholarly output, resources and leverages open infrastructure, and builds broad community agreement around approaches for open data metrics, including using existing standards and resources. In preparation for the NIH policy, the community has an opportune moment to build for researchers’ best interests and support the advancement of biomedical sciences, including assessment, reward, and mechanisms for improving policy resources and supportive infrastructure as the space evolves.

Open Research Co-Ordinator (Research Data Management) | University of Salford

Are you interested in working in a fast-paced research sector with room to progress, and the opportunity to develop a specialist service? Could you use your expertise to deliver engaging workshops and training courses to help people develop skills?

As the Open Research Co-Ordinator (Research Data Management) you will work alongside a small, specialised team with responsibility for co-ordinating the ongoing development and delivery of our Open Research Support service for the University. Our service is centred on early intervention and providing clear and accessible advice to researchers and postgraduate research students at all stages of their career, as well as informing institutional direction and working closely with the open research sector. You can get a sense of our Open Research offer on our website and Twitter account.

We are based within the Library, Careers & Enterprise – a place to learn and share ideas, a virtual hub for research and discovery, a team of friendly faces delivering excellent customer service, and a community of experts playing an important role in teaching, learning, research, and enterprise at Salford. We are innovative, open, collaborative, and people centred.

[…]

Job FDM-Scouts (m/w/d) – Hochschule Mainz + 6 weitere Hochschulen in Rheinland-Pfalz

From Google’s English:  “The joint project “Sustainable and quality-assured competence development for RDM at HAW in RLP – FDM@HAW.rlp” aims at the development and long-term establishment of cross-university structures and services in the field of research data management (RDM) at the universities of applied sciences (HAW) in Rhineland-Palatinate. The implementation is to be carried out by a nationwide FDM competence team that is in constant interaction with each other.”

How to be FAIR with your data. A teaching and training handbook for higher education institutions

This handbook aims to support higher education institutions with the integration of FAIR-related content in their curricula and teaching. It was written and edited by a group of about 40 collaborators in a series of six book sprint events that took place between 1 and 10 June 2021. The document provides practical material, such as competence profiles, learning outcomes and lesson plans, and supporting information. It incorporates community feedback received during the public consultation which ran from 27 July to 12 September 2021.

Acknowledgements

This handbook underwent a community review from 26 July to 12 September 2021. We are grateful to all contributors for their valuable, much appreciated feedback.

We would like to extend special thanks for their extensive and thorough review and contribution to: Romain David, Hervé L’Hours, Karsten Peters, Esther Plomp, Muriel Swijghuisen Reigersberg, Francesco Varrato, Niklas Zimmer

Furthermore, we would like to thank: Esther Asef, Bill Ayres, Noemi BC, Fay Campbell, Leyla Jael Castro, Julien Colomb, Philipp Conzett, Antica Culina, Stefanie De Bodt, Vilém D?d, Julian Dederke, Mary Donaldson, Christina Elsenga, Jeanine Finn, Vinciane Gaillard, Marjan Grootveld, W H, Simon Kerridge, Ilja Kocken, Ellen Leenarts, Allyson Lister, Lachlan MacLeod, Izaskun Mallona, Paula Martinez Lavanchy, Janice Masud-Paul, Joke Meeus, Gene Melzack, Megan O’Donnell, Lisanna Paladin, Limor Peer, Robin Rice, Jürgen Rohrwild, Susanna-Assunta Sansone, Gabriele Schwiertz, Yasmeen Shorish, Shelley Stall, Alexander Steckel, Liz Stokes, Annette Strauch, Ádám Száldobágyi, Rick Thompson, Christophe Trefois, Enrique Wulff, as well as everyone who contributed anonymously.