OA Policy Formulation, Adoption and Implementation Forum | EIFL

“EIFL’s partner consortium, the Kenya Libraries and Information Services Consortium (KLISC), is organizing an Open Access Policy Formulation, Adoption and Implementation Forum at the University of Kabianga in Kenya. 

The Forum will be facilitated by Dr George Gitau, Chief University Librarian at Kenyatta University and EIFL Open Access Coordinator in Kenya, his colleague, Miriam Ndungu, Iryna Kuchma, EIFL Open Access Programme Manager, and Dr Penninah Musangi, University Librarian at Amref International University. 

The Forum will comprise two parts. First, there will be presentations and discussion of emerging trends in the open access movement, open access repositories, open access journal publishing and open access policy development. The facilitators will highlight how open access contributes to institutional and researcher visibility, and the importance of ORCID and Google Scholar indexing, copyright, licensing and plagiarism issues….”

Lo | The Factors Significant to the Introduction of Institutional Open Access Policies: Two Case Studies of R-1 Universities | Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

Abstract:  INTRODUCTION US universities are increasingly unable to afford research journal subscriptions due to the rising prices charged by for-profit academic publishers. Open access (OA) appears to be the most backed option to disrupt the current publishing model. The purpose of this study is to understand the factors significant to the introduction of institutional OA policies at selected United States R-1 universities. METHODS An in-depth qualitative study, including interviews with stakeholders, was conducted on two R-1universities with OA policies that have been implemented for at least five years. results The results of this study reveal that while the perceived sustainability of the scholarly communication business model was an initial driver, open dissemination of knowledge was the primary factor for the development of institutional policies. discussion Open dissemination of knowledge aligns with the mission of both institutions. Interviewees believe that a wider and more open dissemination of the institution’s research cost could positively affect their faculty’s research impact, which could then affect the institution’s reputation, rankings, classifications and funding. CONCLUSION While the initial driver for exploring OA scholarly communication for both institutions was the perceived unsustainability of the scholarly communication model, the most important factor that led to the creation of their policies was the desire to disseminate the faculty’s scholarship.

 

Open Access Mandates in Universities: Challenges and Opportunities

“An Open Access mandate refers to a policy adopted by a funder, institution or the government which necessitates researchers to make their research articles public. This can be done via two routes: Green OA or Gold OA. The former refers to the researcher depositing her research article to an open access repository, generally institutional. The latter refers to submission of research to open access journals?—?some of which may levy Article Processing Charges (APCs) that can be paid by the researcher, his institution or from the research grant.

Universities that have adopted OA mandates include Harvard University (the first to do so), MIT, ETH Zurich, University of Liege and University College London. Harvard University has also developed a model policy language document for institutions looking to implement an open access policy for their faculty….”

From principles to practices: Open Science at Europe’s universities: 2020-2021 EUA Open Science Survey results

“KEY RESULTS: • Open Science principles: over half (59%) of the surveyed institutions rated Open Science’s strategic importance as very high or high. Open Access to research publications was considered to be highly important for 90% of institutions, but only 60% considered its implementation level to be high. However, the gap between importance and implementation is much wider in data-related areas (RDM, FAIR and data sharing): high importance at between 55-70% of the institutions surveyed, with high levels of implementation at 15-25%. • Open Science policies: 54% of institutions have an Open Science policy and 37% are developing one. Only 9% of surveyed institutions lack an Open Science policy or are not planning to draft one. • Monitoring Open Access to research publications: 80% of institutions monitored the number of publications in their repository and 70% monitored articles published by their researchers in Open Access journals. In addition, almost 60% reported monitoring the cost of publications by their researchers in Open Access journals. • Infrastructure for Open Access to research publications: 90% of the institutions surveyed have their own repository, participate in a shared repository or both. For journal hosting or publishing platforms this figure reaches 66%, and levels out at 57% for monograph hosting/publishing. In addition, 66% of those surveyed reported that their institution has participated in or supported non-commercial Open Access publishing. • Data-related skills: over 50% of the surveyed institutions reported that research data skills were only partially available. Moreover, all of the institutions that indicated the absence or partial availability of data skills, considered that more of these skills are needed at institutional level. • Emerging areas of Open Science: Approximately 50% of the respondents know of citizen science and open education activities at their institutions. • Open Science in academic assessment: In 34% of institutions, none of the Open Science elements examined by the survey were included in academic assessments. Amongst the institutions that included Open Science activities in their academic assessments, 77% took into consideration article deposition in a repository….”

Bilan du Plan national pour la science ouverte : des engagements tenus, des avancées majeures réalisées en 3 ans – Ministère de l’Enseignement supérieur, de la Recherche et de l’Innovation

“On July 4, 2018, Frédérique Vidal, Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation, launched the National Plan for Open Science on the occasion of the LIBER days, which bring together more than 400 European university libraries, in the University of Lille.

The report on the implementation of the plan published today traces the many actions carried out during these three years and is a powerful testimony to the respect of the commitments made .

The National Open Science Fund was created , it launched two calls for projects in favor of open scientific publication and it supported structuring international initiatives.  
Substantial resources have been deployed to strengthen and perpetuate the national open archive HAL, both technically and for its governance and economic model.  
The National Research Agency and other funding agencies now require open access to publications and the drafting of data management plans for the projects they fund.  
The function of ministerial research data administrator has been created and a network is being deployed in the establishments. It is about having a strategic vision on the management and openness of research data.  
Several guides and recommendations for putting open science into practice in everyday research have been published.  
About twenty universities and research organizations have adopted an open science policy.  
France has taken its full place at European and international level to promote its vision of open science  : – the National Open Science Fund has supported structuring international initiatives, such as Software Heritage, the world archive of software, or Research Data Alliance, – it plays its full part in the structuring of the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) and participates in its governance….”

From principles to practices: Open Science at Europe’s universities 2020-2021 EUA Open Science Survey results

2020-2021 EUA Open Science Survey results

by Rita Morais, Bregt Saenen, Federica Garbuglia, Stephane Berghmans and Vinciane Gaillard

This report presents the findings of the 2020-2021 EUA Open Science Survey and provides evidence-based recommendations for institutions, researchers, research funders and policy makers on the transition towards Open Science. With more than 270 responses from 36 European countries, the survey report focuses on the level of development of Open Science in European universities. It also addresses the role of Open Science in institutions’ strategic priorities and its implementation in institutional practices.

OA Policy Formulation, Adoption and Implementation Forum | EIFL

“EIFL Open Access Coordinator in Kenya, Dr George Gitau, Chief University Librarian at Kenyatta University, Iryna Kuchma, EIFL Open Access Programme Manager, and Rosemary Otando, Deputy University Librarian at the University of Nairobi, will facilitate the Open Access Policy Formulation, Adoption and Implementation Forum at Amref International University. 

The Forum will comprise two parts. First, there will be presentations and discussion of emerging trends in the open access movement, open access repositories, open access journal publishing and open access policy development. The facilitators will highlight how open access contributes to institutional and researcher visibility, and the importance of ORCID and Google Scholar indexing, copyright, licensing and plagiarism issues….”

Open-Access-Policy, Freie Universität Berlin

As part of its commitment to open access to scientific information and as a signatory of the “Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities,” Freie Universität Berlin calls on all university members to publish the results of their research digitally in accordance with the open access principle without access restrictions.

 

Im Rahmen ihres Engagements für den freien Zugang zu wissenschaftlichen Informationen und als Unter-zeichnerin der „Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities“ fordert die Freie Universität Berlin alle Universitätsangehörigen auf, die Ergebnisse ihrer Forschung nach dem Open-Access-Prinzip ohne Zugriffsbeschränkungen digital zu veröffentlichen.

Forschungsdaten-Policy / Research Data Policy, Freie Universität Berlin

This policy covers both research-relevant analog data, documents and objects that are digitized in the course of research, and genuinely digital data, documents and objects (“born digital”) that are created during a research process and are the object or result of research. In addition, information that ensures the documentation, traceability and – depending on the field of research – reproducibility of the results (metadata) also counts as research data.
 

Gegenstand der vorliegenden Policy sind sowohl forschungsrelevante, im Forschungsverlauf zu digitalisieren-de analoge Daten, Dokumente und Objekte, sowie genuin digitale Daten, Dokumente und Objekte („born digi-tal“), die während eines Forschungsprozesses entstehen, Forschungsgegenstand oder -ergebnis sind. Darüber hinaus zählen hier auch solche Informationen als Forschungsdaten, die die Dokumentation, Nachvollziehbar-keit und – abhängig vom Forschungsgebiet – Reproduzierbarkeit der Ergebnisse gewährleisten (Metadaten).

Full Text of Open Access Policy – Open Access – LibGuides at California State University, East Bay

I. Preamble

The Faculty of California State University, East Bay is committed to disseminating its research and scholarship as widely as possible. In particular, as part of a public university system, the Faculty is dedicated to making its scholarship available to the people of California and the world. Faculties across leading universities have adopted comparable open access policies to retain rights to publicly share their articles, and CSUEB, which strives to be a national model of public comprehensive higher education and a leader in the CSU system, would be the first in the California State University system to adopt such a policy. Furthermore, the Faculty recognizes the benefits that accrue to themselves as individual scholars, the University as a whole, as well as the scholarly enterprise for such wide dissemination, including greater recognition and a general increase in scientific, scholarly, and critical knowledge. Faculty further recognize that with this policy they can more easily and collectively reserve rights of their scholarly articles that might otherwise be signed away, often unnecessarily, in agreements with publishers. Such a policy will give CSUEB a legal basis to host and provide public access to future Faculty scholarly articles. In keeping with these considerations, the Faculty adopts the following policy:
 

II. Grant of License, Limitations, and Scope

The Faculty is committed to making their scholarly articles widely and freely available in an open access repository. In keeping with that commitment, each Faculty member grants to CSUEB a nonexclusive, irrevocable, worldwide license to exercise any and all rights under copyright relating to each of their scholarly articles, in any medium, provided that the articles are not sold for a profit, and to authorize others to do the same. This policy does not transfer or affect copyright ownership, which is determined by existing CSUEB policy1. This policy applies to all scholarly articles authored or co-authored while the person is a faculty unit employee2 or emeritus faculty member3, except for any articles completed before the adoption of this policy or any articles for which the Faculty member entered into an incompatible licensing or publishing agreement before the adoption of this policy….”

University of Hull Open Access Policy – revised May 2021 – Digital Repository

“The University of Hull recognises open access publication as a valuable component of dissemination for research outputs. Open access publication channels for journal articles in particular now sit alongside more traditional publication channels as options: equivalent options are rapidly developing for monographs and research data. Open access dissemination of research outputs broadens the audience that can be reached and enables wider awareness of the research. This can generate more and quicker impact, with concomitant reputational benefits for future research.

Research funders are increasingly advocating and requiring consideration of open access as a means of publication to realise these advantages. Similarly, openness of research generally is now at the forefront of public research funding policy, and open access is a key component of this. This policy describes an approach to open access for the University of Hull that blends the advantages of open access with the requirements laid out by funders in following this path.

This revised and updated policy was agreed in May 2021….”

COVID-19 and the research scholarship ecosystem: help! – Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

Highlights

Data sharing is not common as part of biomedical publications
To increase data sharing biomedical journals, funders and academic institutions should introduce policies that will enhance data sharing and other open science practices
As part of research assessments incentives and rewards need to be introduced

Abstract

Objectives

Data sharing practices remain elusive in biomedicine. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the problems associated with the lack of data sharing. The objective of this article is to draw attention to the problem and possible ways to address it.

Study Design and Setting

This article examines some of the current open access and data sharing practices at biomedical journals and funders. In the context of COVID-19 the consequences of these practices is also examined.

Results

Despite the best of intentions on the part of funders and journals, COVID-19 biomedical research is not open. Academic institutions need to incentivize and reward data sharing practices as part of researcher assessment. Journals and funders need to implement strong polices to ensure that data sharing becomes a reality. Patients support sharing of their data.

Conclusion

Biomedical journals, funders and academic institutions should act to require stronger adherence to data sharing policies.

Transformative Agreements and Institutional Open Access Policies, Principles, and Strategies

“In March 2021 the University of California announced a four-year transformative agreement with Elsevier covering reading access and open-access publishing for UC authors. While there continues to be significant discussion over the merits of UC’s approach, one aspect of this agreement that has not been widely discussed is how it relates to UC’s open access policies for research articles written by anyone employed by UC.

Given the great interest in UC’s agreement and policies, this event will focus on helping attendees understand the mechanics of UC’s approach to furthering open access to scholarship. Ellen Finnie, Open Access Publisher Agreements Manager for the UC Office of Scholarly Communication, will provide a brief presentation on the interaction of the transformative agreement and UC’s OA policies, principles, and strategies, followed by plenty of time for discussion.

This event is co-sponsored by the OA2020 US Working Group and Community of Practice and the Coalition of Open Access Policy Institutions (COAPI). All are welcome to attend.”

Board of Visitors approves universitywide scholarly articles open access policy | Virginia Tech Daily | Virginia Tech

“During its March 22 meeting, the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors approved the resolution to establish a scholarly articles open access policy, a revision to the university’s Policy on Intellectual Property 13000. As a result, Virginia Tech authors grant the university nonexclusive license to their scholarly articles in order to make them openly available through the university’s repository, VTechWorks, housed and maintained by the University Libraries at Virginia Tech. …

According to the approved policy, Virginia Tech authors will deposit an electronic copy of their unformatted, post peer-review, accepted manuscript for each scholarly article within one month after the date of its publication. Then, the university grants authors a nonexclusive license to share accepted manuscripts elsewhere. An author may waive the license for an article or delay access for a specified period of time to honor publisher embargoes. According to the policy, the university may not sell the articles. …”