Transitioning punctum books to Open Source Infrastructure · punctum books

“Without open source digital infrastructure, open access publishing has no long-term chance of truly remaining open, that is, not only free to read but also free to write, free to edit, and free to publish. Without a commitment to make, as much as possible, the entire book production pipeline open, the decision of who gets to write and who gets to read will always remain beholden to actors that do not consider the public good their first priority.

An overarching profit motive of any of the vendors that punctum books uses as part of its pipeline posits a risk for our open access ideal: we are as weak as our most commercial link. Furthermore, the implementation of GDPR in the European Union obliges us to be much more careful with what happens with the personal data of our authors and readers – and rightfully so. Like knowledge, privacy is a public good that is at odds with the idea of profit maximalization. The open source community, on the contrary, embraces the public sharing of knowledge while safeguarding the human right to privacy.

Our first step was to find a replacement of the technically most complicated part of the book production process, the book design itself. This brought us to the good folks of Editoria, who are very close to cracking the nut of creating an open source online collaborative environment for the editing of scholarly texts combined with an output engine that creates well designed EPUB, HTML, PDF, and ICML output formats.

Through the COPIM project of Scholarled, punctum books was also already involved in the development of a metadata database and management system (under the codenames Thoth and Hapi) that will be the first free and open source system to generate ONIX, MARC, and KBART records….”

Transitioning punctum books to Open Source Infrastructure · punctum books

“Without open source digital infrastructure, open access publishing has no long-term chance of truly remaining open, that is, not only free to read but also free to write, free to edit, and free to publish. Without a commitment to make, as much as possible, the entire book production pipeline open, the decision of who gets to write and who gets to read will always remain beholden to actors that do not consider the public good their first priority.

An overarching profit motive of any of the vendors that punctum books uses as part of its pipeline posits a risk for our open access ideal: we are as weak as our most commercial link. Furthermore, the implementation of GDPR in the European Union obliges us to be much more careful with what happens with the personal data of our authors and readers – and rightfully so. Like knowledge, privacy is a public good that is at odds with the idea of profit maximalization. The open source community, on the contrary, embraces the public sharing of knowledge while safeguarding the human right to privacy.

Our first step was to find a replacement of the technically most complicated part of the book production process, the book design itself. This brought us to the good folks of Editoria, who are very close to cracking the nut of creating an open source online collaborative environment for the editing of scholarly texts combined with an output engine that creates well designed EPUB, HTML, PDF, and ICML output formats.

Through the COPIM project of Scholarled, punctum books was also already involved in the development of a metadata database and management system (under the codenames Thoth and Hapi) that will be the first free and open source system to generate ONIX, MARC, and KBART records….”

Meet Plume: A new PubSweet platform created by the French Financial Jurisdictions : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

“The French financial jurisdictions, which include the Paris-based Cour des comptes (the French Superior Audit Institution) and the regional and territorial chambers of accounts, have been collaborating with Coko for the past 10 months, building an experimental PubSweet platform.

The project is part of a program called Public Interest Entrepreneurs, directed by Etalab, a department of the French Interministerial Directorate for Digital Affairs that promotes open data and open source. The project is headed up by two public interest entrepreneurs, Nikos Peteinatos, designer and member of the Editoria Advisory Group, and Erica Marco, developer.

The system, currently under development, is called Plume, and it leverages the PubSweet framework and community modules, including Editoria, Wax and Paged.js (from the forthcoming Cabbage Tree Labs). The pilot phase of the project ran for ten months, and deemed successful, the team now embarks on a secondary phase over the next six months with two new developers joining the team….

The system’s primary function is to facilitate the authoring of audit reports. It can be thought of as a customized version of Editoria….”

Meet PubSweet – Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms

“PubSweet is Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms. PubSweet enables you to easily build a publishing platform tailored to your own needs. It is designed to be modular and flexible.

PubSweet can be used to rapidly create custom publishing systems. If the existing components do not completely meet your needs, you can focus development on building new components to provide just the new functionality required.

Join the PubSweet community and help us build a common resource of open components for publishing by contributing components back.

Documentation and further information about PubSweet can be found here. Below are Publishing platforms built with PubSweet….”

Meet PubSweet – Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms

“PubSweet is Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms. PubSweet enables you to easily build a publishing platform tailored to your own needs. It is designed to be modular and flexible.

PubSweet can be used to rapidly create custom publishing systems. If the existing components do not completely meet your needs, you can focus development on building new components to provide just the new functionality required.

Join the PubSweet community and help us build a common resource of open components for publishing by contributing components back.

Documentation and further information about PubSweet can be found here. Below are Publishing platforms built with PubSweet….”

Meet PubSweet – Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms

“PubSweet is Coko’s free, open source framework for building state-of-the-art publishing platforms. PubSweet enables you to easily build a publishing platform tailored to your own needs. It is designed to be modular and flexible.

PubSweet can be used to rapidly create custom publishing systems. If the existing components do not completely meet your needs, you can focus development on building new components to provide just the new functionality required.

Join the PubSweet community and help us build a common resource of open components for publishing by contributing components back.

Documentation and further information about PubSweet can be found here. Below are Publishing platforms built with PubSweet….”

A Guest Post from Hindawi – Introducing Phenom Review: Open Source Scholarly Infrastructure by Hindawi – OASPA

“Peer review systems have developed over time to adjust to the changing requirements of different academic journals, pushing the legacy systems to the edge of their capabilities. Most importantly, an ongoing shift towards a more open culture in scholarly communications, including Open Access and Open Data, has created new challenges by bringing to light the inherent limitations of current proprietary infrastructure. 

Now, imagine a world where peer review systems were built in a way that serves the wider research community, reducing duplication of effort, increasing flexibility and editorial control without sacrificing transparency, and bringing the cost of publishing down. What would that world look like and how do we build it? 

This month, a second Hindawi journal will move onto the Phenom Review system, our new peer review platform built entirely open source. Phenom Review is part of Hindawi’s collaboration with Coko utilizing their open source PubSweet framework….”

Development sneak preview – Editoria

Editoria’s web-based word processor is being upgraded, along with the rest of the system, in response to the community’s most recent roadmap. In the current version of Editoria, Monemvasia, we have contextually sensitive styles. This means that once a component is recognized as a frontmatter item, for example, the ‘menu’ of style options available automatically updates to display only the styles relevant within the context of a front matter component. The same is true for parts, unnumbered components and chapters.

To take styling in the web-based word processor (via the Wax editor) to the next level, Christos Kokosias, Wax lead developer, is working up functionality (suggested by friends at punctum books) that adds the ability to customize tags at the chapter level. This will help with pagination as it improves the quality of the HTML available to export tools using CSS to automatically typeset content prepared in the browser….”

Who is Coko? An interview with Coko Co-founder and visionary Adam Hyde : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

The Scholarly Communications sector can learn a lot from open source and open processes. For example, at Coko we don’t actually own anything. It is the community that owns it. We facilitate the communities success and their success is our success. We share everything we have with them – code, methods, processes, PR, expertise, funding, successes, coffee! – and they in turn share those things with us. We are the community, the community is us. That can only happen in an environment of trust and trust is what openness – the core ingredient to best practice open source – is all about. If more people within the Scholarly Communications sector at large can learn to work like this then they will benefit from it greatly….”

Detroit Management Summit : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

It’s the beginning of a new chapter in the Coko story, and we are writing it together in Detroit, Michigan ahead of the Association of University Presses meeting, which we will attend and present at. We, of course, are Coko’s new management team, Adam, Jure and I. Together, we are discussing the structure of the organization and our offerings moving forward….

We are streamlining Coko. In the spirit of our signature transparency, we are sharing these early ideas with you. Moving forward, we will align Workflow Sprints and all Coko’s current activities such as developer workshops, open source consultancy and events around PubSweet. Editoria will continue to be a community-led project participating in the PubSweet Community, along with Hindawi’s Phenom, eLife’s Libero, micropublications.org and other platforms developed or developing with PubSweet. Wax, XSweet and Paged.js will be part of Cabbage Tree Labs (stay tuned for more on this soon)….”

What is Open?

Open Source for Open Scholarship began when a community of people gathered to discuss how open projects might better support each other. Adam Hyde, co-founder of the Collaborative Open Knowledge Foundation (Coko), convened a group of people working on open tools for science and research and facilitated a one day meeting. This turned into regular calls, the development of a supportive network, and lead to the 2018 meeting that produced this handbook.  Face to face meetings and regular calls allow a community to develop a common vocabulary. Community vocabularies may be unclear to folks who were not in the room or on the call when terms were discussed.  This post will define the terms we use to frame our work. Our hope is that this will both give context to the posts in this series and make it easy for newcomers to jump in to open source and scholarship community discussions….”

Much to say about editors! – Editoria

Editoria afficinados will know that the web based word processor that makes our color-coded track changes (and many others) dreams come true is actually a PubSweet component called Wax. And PubSweet pros will know that the component is based on the Substance editor libraries. Still, there are many more layers, both inside Coko technology, and out.

Open source collaborative editors are a very specialized domain. Recently, Coko’s lead PubSweet Developer Jure Triglav wrote a very detailed landscape view of all of the different editor options available in this space.

Also, Coko is working on creating a version of Wax that built against the ProseMirror library, and will be integrated in to Editoria in future. Christos Kokosias is the Lead Wax Developer and specializes in this area. Recently, Coko Co-founder Adam Hyde sat down with Christos to talk about editors. You can listen in!…”

PubSweet Collaboration Week – May 7 – 13 : Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

About three years ago, we set out to build a framework for building publishing software with components. Take a component here, a component there, make one on your own, and, presto! you have your custom publishing platform! While the framework itself has matured significantly, we’re not there yet in terms of the available components and how they fit together.

At the same time, we started building a community around this framework, organisations and people looking to innovate within this space and looking for a way to do so. While building a community has to happen in parallel with software development, I think that if you’re doing open source development right, your community will be ahead of the software most of the time. This is certainly the case for us. We envisioned a community that openly shares their experiences and solutions and is willing to collaborate on new ideas, despite basically being competitors, and I can happily (and proudly) say that our community has already reached this ideal.

To close the loop and make PubSweet the go-to framework and component library for developing publishing software, we need to take the lessons from the three systems in production right now (Hindawi’s, EBI’s and eLife’s publishing systems) and incorporate them into PubSweet itself, for everyone to use and benefit from. If we could just get the designers and developers of these systems in the same room, get them to talk to each other, share their custom approaches and try to find commonalities between them… wouldn’t that be awesome? Luckily our community is awesome, and well-versed in that sort of thing, and that’s exactly what’s happening in our event this week!

For the inaugural PubSweet Collaboration Week, starting on May 7th, Coko, EBI, eLife and Hindawi are getting together in Cambridge to make more parts of these systems reusable and add them to PubSweet’s component library….”