NWO to support three new open infrastructures | NWO

 

Open science benefits from an open infrastructure and thriving networks and communities that support the scientific community in sharing publications, data and software openly. NWO’s support to the following four organisations contributes to this.

Open science Infrastructures

OpenCitations

OpenCitations is a non-profit organisation dedicated to publishing open bibliographic and citation data using Linked Data technologies. Providing an open database of citations reduces the reliance on commercial products for doing bibliometric research and citation measurement.

Research Organization Registry (ROR)

ROR is a global, open registry for identifying research organisations run by the academic community. ROR makes it easy for any person or system to standardise institutional names and link research organisations to researchers and research outputs. ROR is also one of the recommended Persistent Identifiers (PIDs) in the NWO PID Strategy.

Public Knowledge Project (PKP)

PKP is a research and development initiative of Simon Fraser University in Canada that develops the leading open source publishing software Open Journal Systems (OJS). More than 30,000 open access journals worldwide use this software. This makes it an essential infrastructure in the open access publishing landscape.

Netherlands Reproducibility Network (NLRN)

NLRN aims to increase knowledge on the transparency and reproducibility of research and to coordinate, support and strengthen initiatives and developments in this field in order to improve the quality and efficiency of research in the Netherlands. NLRN is a member of the international network of national reproducibility networks.

Open science stands for the transition to a more open and participatory research practice in which publications, data, software and other forms of scientific information are shared and made available for reuse at the earliest possible stage. Open science leads to greater impact, both on science and on society. NWO believes that publicly funded research should be openly available and is actively contributing to the transition to open science.

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NWO supports a number of non-profit, community-led initiatives aimed at renewing the scientific communication system. See more details on these infrastructures.

Coverage of DOAJ journals’ citations through OpenCitations – Protocol

Abstract:  This is the protocol for the research of the coverage of DOAJ journals’ citations through OpenCitations.

Our goal is to find out:

about the coverage of articles from open access journals in DOAJ journals as citing and cited articles,

how many citations do DOAJ journals receive and do, and how many of these citations involve open access articles as both citing and cited entities,

as well as the presence of trends over time of the availability of citations involving articles published in open access journals in DOAJ journals.

Our research focuses on DOAJ journals exclusively, using OpenCitations as a tool. Previous research has been made on open citations using COCI (Heibi, Peroni & Shotton 2019), and on DOAJ journals’ citations (Saadat and Shabani 2012), paving the grounds for our present analysis.

 

After careful considerations on the best way to retrieve data from DOAJ and OpenCitations, we opted for downloading the public data dumps. Using the API resulted in a way too long running time, and the same problem arose for using the SPARQL endpoint of OpenCitations.

Discover DOCI, the index of open citations from DataCite – OpenCitations blog

“We’re excited to introduce DOCI, the OpenCitations Index of Datacite open DOI-to-DOI citations, a new tool containing citations derived from publications bearing DataCite DOIs to other DOI-identified publications, harvested from DataCite. The citations available in DOCI are treated as first-class data entities, with accompanying properties including the citations timespan, modelled according to the OpenCitations Data Model. 

Currently, DOCI’s December 2022 release contains 169,822,752 citations from 1,753,860  bibliographic resources, and is based on the last dump of DataCite dated 22 October 2021 provided by the Internet Archive. …”

Please help with OpenCitations’ entry in Wikipedia – OpenCitations blog

“The Wikipedia entry for OpenCitations is woefully out of date, inaccurate and brief. As Directors of OpenCitations, Silvio and I are unable to improve this situation because of Wikipedia’s proper conflict-of-interest restriction on self-promotion.

OpenCitations is actively seeking greater involvement from members of the global academic community, as explained in our Mission Statement. One way in which such individuals, particularly those who are both existing Wikipedia editors and already know about OpenCitations, can help OpenCitations, while at the same time supporting Wikipedia in its quest for accurate information, is by revising and expanding the present Wikipedia entry on OpenCitations to reflect the infrastructure’s current activities and data holdings, while maintaining perspective and a neutral point of view. This will increase the availability of reliable knowledge about OpenCitations and its place in the ecosystem of Open Science infrastructures….”

OpenCitations receives the Open Publishing Award in Open Data | OpenCitations blog

“We are proud and humbled to count the Open Publishing Award in Open Data among the acknowledgements so far received by OpenCitations. Despite the term “award”, the Open Publishing Awards, in fact, don’t aim to proclaim winners, but rather to “shake the hands” of some projects which seem to be following (and tracing) a right path towards a more open knowledge. All the projects awarded help by defining more concretely what “open”means, and at the same time their example encourages awareness on the variety of the open publishing projects, and a reflection about the common values and goals that gather so many different people, institutions and organizations.”

From little acorns . . . A retrospective on OpenCitations | OpenCitations blog

“Now that OpenCitations is hosting over one billion freely available scholarly bibliographic citations, this is perhaps an opportune moment to look back to the start of this initiative. A little over eleven years ago, on 24 April 2010, I spoke at the Open Knowledge Foundation Conference, OKCon2010, in London, on the topic

OpenCitations: Publishing Bibliographic Citations as Linked Open Data

I reported that, earlier that same week, I had applied to Jisc for a one-year grant to fund the OpenCitations Project (opencitations.net). Jisc (at that time ‘The JISC’, the Joint Information Systems Committee) was tasked by the UK government, among other things, to support research and development in information technology for the benefit of the academic community.

The purpose of that original OpenCitations R&D project was to develop a prototype in which we:

harvested citations from the open access biomedical literature in PubMed Central;
described and linked them using CiTO, the Citation Typing Ontology [1];
encoded and organized them in an RDF triplestore; and
published them as Linked Open Data in the OpenCitations Corpus (OCC)….”