Seeking UX Consultant – Scaling Up a Collaborative Consortial Institutional Repository

“Hyku for Consortia seeks a UX Consultant to work with project staff to develop and implement a series of user research activities determining the most useful updates for the Samvera-based Hyku digital repository software. 

The UX Consultant will determine the best activities for the project goals, develop resources and plans for activities, carry them out with selected candidates, and assist in the analysis of results. Research activities may include surveys, interviews, focus groups, usability tests or other related feedback mechanisms. The Consultant will work closely with and have the support of the project team to accomplish their goals. Prior experience with user research, excellent communication skills, and attention to detail will be essential in this role….”

Florida State University Libraries debuts new digital project hosting service | Florida State University Libraries

“Florida State University Libraries announces the launch of CreateFSU, a new web-hosting service for digital research projects.

CreateFSU allows faculty, students and staff to host and publish websites related to their digital research and pedagogy projects using cutting-edge and industry-standard web publishing tools. Created to supplement FSU’s existing web-hosting services for faculty, students and departments, CreateFSU provides researchers and instructors with the ability to build a digital presence for projects spanning from interactive maps and visualizations to collaborative course blogs and digital museum exhibits….

Each user is provided with a unique domain name and given access to a dashboard with several different applications, including WordPress, MediaWiki, Scalar, Omeka (digital library) and Drupal. Once installed, these applications give users the freedom to create blogs, publish videos, author books and share research data….”

Partnership Announcement: Cypris and CORE

“We’re delighted to announce a new partnership between CORE and Cypris, a leading AI-driven, market intelligence platform that connects research & development (R&D) teams with innovation data and trends in their field.

The partnership will provide Cypris with unlimited access to over 210 million open access articles to further enhance their platform and regularly add live market data to provide R&D teams with the most up-to-date research in their fields of interest….”

Archivists Create a Searchable Index of 107 Million Science Articles

“The General Index is here to serve as your map to human knowledge. Pulled from 107,233,728 journal articles, The General Index is a searchable collection of keywords and short sentences from published papers that can serve as a map to the paywalled domains of scientific knowledge.

In full, The General Index is a massive 38 terabyte archive of searchable terms. Compressed, it comes to 8.5 terabytes. It can be pulled directly from archive.org, which can be a difficult and lengthy process. People on the /r/DataHoarder subreddit have uploaded the data to a remote server and are spreading it across BitTorrent. You can help by grabbing a seed here.

The General Index does not contain the entirety of the journal articles it references, simply the keywords and n-grams—a string of simple phrases containing a keyword—that make tracking down a specific article easier. “This is an early release of the general index, a work in progress,” Carl Malamud, the founder of Public.Resource.org and co-creator of the General Index, said in a video about the archive. “In some cases text extraction failed, sometimes metadata is not available or is perhaps incorrect while the underlying corpus is large, it is not complete and it is not up to date.”…”

Live Webinar: Open systems and library analytics – 1501970

“Open source software and interoperable services for library management and analytics provide libraries with more choice in how to deploy, support and develop mission-critical applications. Join this webinar to learn more about EBSCO’s support for FOLIO, the open source library services platform, and Panorama, an interoperable application for library analytics.”

Humanities Commons Receives $971,000 Mellon Grant to Support Its Expansion – College of Arts & Letters

“Humanities Commons, which is hosted and sustained by Michigan State University and led by Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Digital Humanities for MSU’s College of Arts & Letters, was awarded a $971,000, 5-year grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support a multi-year restructuring of its business model.

An online open-source platform, Humanities Commons facilitates communication and collaboration among scholars and practitioners across the humanities and around the world. It enables users to engage in discussions across humanities disciplines and to share articles, presentations, and other scholarly materials with their peers and the public. Members also create online professional profiles to help connect with others and to share their work more broadly. …”

Getty Publications: how Quire is creating solutions to open access publishing – MuseumNext

“In anticipation of MuseumNext’s Digital Collections Summit next week (4-6 October) we caught up with Erine Cecele Dunigan, Community Manager for Quire, an open-source digital publishing tool developed by Getty.

Erin will be giving a talk on Wednesday 6 October entitled, Open Access: Getty’s Approach to Digital Collection Catalogues….

Quire is a modern digital publishing tool developed by Getty. It’s ideal for creating dynamic publications in a variety of formats, including web, print, and e-book. In addition to being optimised for scholarly and visually rich publishing, Quire books are designed for longevity, sustainability, and discoverability.

Getty originally conceived Quire as a solution to its open access publishing needs, but the tool quickly gained the attention of other organisations within the fields of digital humanities, arts, and academia. While access is currently available for free upon request, we will be launching as a fully open-source publishing tool by Spring 2022. Open-sourcing Quire will enable others to leverage the work Getty has done to create, customise, and distribute critical digital scholarship online, at a low cost, and with little ongoing maintenance….”

PALNI and PALCI Partner to Remove Barriers to Hyku Adoption with IMLS Grant Award

“The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) has awarded $248,050 to the Private Academic Library Network of Indiana (PALNI) in partnership with The Partnership for Academic Library Collaboration & Innovation (PALCI) for Hyku for Consortia: Removing Barriers to Adoption as part of the National Leadership Grants for Libraries Program. IMLS received 172 applications requesting more than $47 million in funding and selected 39 applicants to receive awards during this grant cycle. With this award, the partners will increase the flexibility, accessibility, and usability of Hyku, the multi-tenant repository platform system.  

Repositories are a critical piece of library infrastructure, enabling access to many types of digital materials created by an institution’s students, faculty, staff, and researchers. Libraries, cultural heritage institutions, and other organizations also use repositories to provide access to digitized special collections….”

Toward Reusable Science with Readable Code and Reproducibility

Abstract:  An essential part of research and scientific communication is researchers’ ability to reproduce the results of others. While there have been increasing standards for authors to make data and code available, many of these files are hard to re-execute in practice, leading to a lack of research reproducibility. This poses a major problem for students and researchers in the same field who cannot leverage the previously published findings for study or further inquiry. To address this, we propose an open-source platform named RE3 that helps improve the reproducibility and readability of research projects involving R code. Our platform incorporates assessing code readability with a machine learning model trained on a code readability survey and an automatic containerization service that executes code files and warns users of reproducibility errors. This process helps ensure the reproducibility and readability of projects and therefore fast-track their verification and reuse.

 

Credibility of scientific information on social media: Variation by platform, genre and presence of formal credibility cues | Quantitative Science Studies | MIT Press

Abstract:  Responding to calls to take a more active role in communicating their research findings, scientists are increasingly using open online platforms, such as Twitter, to engage in science communication or to publicize their work. Given the ease with which misinformation spreads on these platforms, it is important for scientists to present their findings in a manner that appears credible. To examine the extent to which the online presentation of science information relates to its perceived credibility, we designed and conducted two surveys on Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. In the first survey, participants rated the credibility of science information on Twitter compared with the same information in other media, and in the second, participants rated the credibility of tweets with modified characteristics: presence of an image, text sentiment, and the number of likes/retweets. We find that similar information about scientific findings is perceived as less credible when presented on Twitter compared to other platforms, and that perceived credibility increases when presented with recognizable features of a scientific article. On a platform as widely distrusted as Twitter, use of these features may allow researchers who regularly use Twitter for research-related networking and communication to present their findings in the most credible formats.

 

Staying open to open science needs | Research Information

“At Silverchair, our clients are innovators, experimenting with emerging content formats, OA models, and more, all of which rely on technology to be implemented in a way that is seamless for the end-users. This means maintaining (and scaling) technology that is flexible enough to accommodate whatever new models our publishers bring to us, whether it’s IWA Publishing with Subscribe to Open, MIT Press with Direct To Open, our society partners piloting smaller scale transformative agreements, or whatever comes next. 

Some of our publishers are aggregators or distributors for a group of societies and publishing partners. These clients are in turn serving a range of societies, from very small to larger independents. And they all have different outlooks and different needs when it comes to open access. 

Some clients have even found that different sorts of open access models are needed depending on the type of content, whether that be arts versus hard sciences, book versus journal, or experimental formats. So, it really does take a variety of models to make this work, which also means that the technical demands vary and are perhaps larger than we’d hope.

Among the most basic platform-level functionality required to support OA are:

Rich article metadata;  

Connections to upstream/downstream and secondary/tertiary publication objects; 

Compliance with FAIR [findable, accessible, interoperable, (machine) readable] principles;  

Information about the users of content; 

Improving the discovery of OA content; and  

Shoring up other revenue streams with the dwindling of subscription revenue …”

Re-thinking Academic Publishing: The Promise of Platform Cooperativism · Business of Knowing, summer 2021

Sustainable, just, and equitable open access academic publishing may sometimes seem to be a utopia. There are just too many “buts” — “but the academic career depends on your scholarly output,” “but you have to publish in ‘high-ranking’ journals.” Yes, there is much to say about the injustices of the academic publishing system, and how we got there and the need for “high-level” action to change funding models and incentives. Yes, it may seem that there are just too many factors outside our control. But are they? Or could we imagine a future where scholars are the ones at the helm of the scholarly publishing ecosystem? In this contribution, we propose to do just that: imagine a different — fairer, more economically sustainable, and inclusive — approach to open access. However, to do that, we need to think not only outside the scope of existing business and publishing models but also the existing organisational models.

Social Science Reproduction Platforms

“The Social Science Reproduction Platform (SSRP) is an openly licensed platform that facilitates the sourcing, cataloging, and review of attempts to verify and improve the computational reproducibility of social science research. Computational reproducibility is the ability to reproduce the results, tables, and other figures found in research articles using the data, code, and materials made available by the authors. The SSRP is meant to be used in combination with the Guide for Accelerating Computational Reproducibility (ACRe Guide), a protocol that includes detailed steps and criteria for assessing and improving reproducibility.

Assessments of reproducibility often gravitate towards binary judgments that declare entire papers as “reproducible” or “not reproducible”. The SSRP allows for a more nuanced approach to reproducibility, where reproducers analyze individual claims and their associated display items, and take concrete steps to improve their reproducibility. SSRP reproductions are transparent and reproducible in themselves since they are based on the ACRe Guide’s standardized reproduction protocol and publicly document their analyses to allow for collaboration, discussion, and reuse. Sign up for a free account now to get started in improving computational reproducibility—one claim at a time!

SSRP was developed as part of the Accelerating Computational Reproducibility in Economics (ACRE) project led by the Berkeley Initiative for Transparency in the Social Sciences (BITSS in collaboration with the AEA Data Editor)….”