U of T launches Knowledge Equity Lab to elevate marginalized voices in academia | University of Toronto

How can researchers overcome the problem of racism in science?

For Leslie Chan, an associate professor at the Centre for Critical Development Studies at the University of Toronto Scarborough, you begin by addressing how science categorizes things like plants, animals, diseases and sociological issues. 

Consider the treatment of the Kenyan vegetable called jute mallow. Its green, fleshy leaves have been eaten in Africa and Asia for at least 2,000 years. High in calcium, potassium, iron, sodium, phosphorus, beta-carotene, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin and ascorbic acid, it has long been considered a staple of the Kenyan diet, according to Mary Abukutsa-Onyango, a professor at Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology.  

Yet, after more than a decade of research, Abukutsa-Onyango struggled to find an international journal to publish a scientific paper she wrote wrote on jute marrow and other African indigenous vegetables, which she argued could replace global monoculture and be used to address the nation’s problems with child malnutrition, poverty, and food security. 

“They didn’t recognize my work, not because it wasn’t good, but because they regarded these plants as weeds,” Abukutsa-Onyango says.

Enter U of T’s Chan. His solution is the Knowledge Equity Lab, which launches this week. The lab, housed at U of T Scarborough’s Centre for Critical Development Studies, is a trans-disciplinary space that seeks to challenge multiple forms of exclusion within the structure of knowledge production and exchange. That includes everything from pushing back against the dominance of the English language in science to learning from Indigenous knowledge and ways of knowing.

Research and Scholarly Communications Librarian

“Western Libraries seeks an individual with strong leadership skills and innovative ideas who is passionate about the opportunity to partner in the planning, implementation, and assessment of research and scholarly communication services. The Research and Scholarly Communications Librarian will collaborate to provide integrated, user-centred library services that engage faculty, students and researchers throughout the research cycle to achieve high quality outcomes.This appointment, which may be filled as a Probationary or Continuing Appointment depending on the experience of the successful candidate, is available beginning Summer/Fall 2020.The rank and salary will commensurate with experience.

Reporting to the Head, Research and Scholarly Communication within Western Libraries, this position is part of the Research and Scholarly Communication (RSC) team. The RSC team is committed to collaborating with researchers across campus throughout the research cycle, to advance the creation, management, dissemination, and preservation of scholarship. The team has expertise in the areas of copyright, author rights, open access advocacy and scholarly publishing, institutional repository services, data management practices, GIS, data services, and knowledge synthesis (e.g. systematic reviews)….”

Brock University Open Access Policy – Brock University Library

“3. Brock Scholars are expected to deposit an electronic copy of their academic journal articles in Brock’s Open Access Repository (“Brock University Digital Repository”) by the date of publication. If needed, articles may be embargoed within the repository upon deposit to meet time periods required by publishers.

4. Each Brock Scholar who deposits their academic journal articles in the Brock University Digital Repository grants the University the non-exclusive permission to archive and disseminate those articles through the Repository, provided that the articles are properly attributed to the authors, and that dissemination is for non-commercial purposes only.

5. Brock Scholars who choose not to deposit an academic journal article in the Brock University Digital Repository shall notify the University Library through the opt-out form made available through the Brock University Library….”

Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL): Open Educational Resources (OER) White Paper

In response to increasing membership interest in Open Educational Resources (OER) and the library’s role in this endeavour, from September 2016 until November 2017, OCUL undertook an environmental scan and analysis of current activities in the realm of open education publishing. This research resulted in the creation of the Open Educational Resources White Paper, which was approved for distribution in November 2017.

The scope of this report focused on the following topics:

  • Overview of the current teaching and learning environment
    • Faculty perspective
    • Student perspective
  • Environmental scan of national and international OER initiatives across libraries
  • Legal considerations and licensing for producing and repurposing existing works
  • Accessibility implications
  • Technology and tools in use
  • Current opportunities and the next frontier

Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL): Open Educational Resources (OER) White Paper

In response to increasing membership interest in Open Educational Resources (OER) and the library’s role in this endeavour, from September 2016 until November 2017, OCUL undertook an environmental scan and analysis of current activities in the realm of open education publishing. This research resulted in the creation of the Open Educational Resources White Paper, which was approved for distribution in November 2017.

The scope of this report focused on the following topics:

  • Overview of the current teaching and learning environment
    • Faculty perspective
    • Student perspective
  • Environmental scan of national and international OER initiatives across libraries
  • Legal considerations and licensing for producing and repurposing existing works
  • Accessibility implications
  • Technology and tools in use
  • Current opportunities and the next frontier

Newsroom : Supporting Faster Discovery of New Medicines

“Ontario is investing in medical research and open science to help speed up the development of new treatments for diseases and conditions such as cancer, diabetes, obesity and rare diseases.

Reza Moridi, Minister of Research, Innovation and Science, was joined by Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science, to announce support for the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC) at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) Research Institute in Ottawa today. The SGC is a public-private partnership based on the principle of open science — making research data open and accessible to researchers everywhere, to speed up the discovery of new medicines. The SGC also helps Ontario attract pharmaceutical investment, build a stronger commercialization pipeline for new treatments and create and retain high quality jobs. Supporting research and innovation is part of our plan to create jobs, grow our economy and help people in their everyday lives.”