News – Call for proposals: Risks and Trust in pursuit of a well functioning Persistent Identifier infrastructure for research – News – Knowledge Exchange

“As part of its work on Open Science, the Knowledge Exchange (KE) are currently exploring the role of Persistent Identifiers (PIDs) within modern-day research. To better understand what is needed to build and exploit a well-functioning PID infrastructure for research, we wish to commission a consultant to undertake further investigation, analysis and recommendations, to identify best possible strategic and operational paths to achieve a well-functioning PID infrastructure for Knowledge Exchange (KE) member states and beyond.

We are inviting consultants to submit proposals to undertake work around ‘PIDs: Risk and Trust’. Detailed information around the background and scope of the PIDs: Risk and Trust work is provided below, along with suggested timelines for completion, selection criteria and contact details for key personal….”

Investing in the Open Access Book infrastructure – A call for action | Zenodo

Abstract:  Books play an essential role in scholarly communication, notably but not only within the Social Sciences and Humanities. Open science benefits the quality and value of research and scholarship. If open access is to benefit society as widely as possible, it is logical to include academic books. In a 2019 briefing paper, Science Europe reported that: “Open access to academic books must be considered in the wider open access policies developed by research institutions, funders, and governments”.

In recent years, Knowledge Exchange, a joint network of six key national organisations in Europe, has been working on gaining a better understanding of the open access book landscape, identifying existing initiatives as well as gaps that need to be addressed in the countries concerned. In general, there is a clear will in the scholarly community to accelerate open access for academic books in order to better serve research and society’s needs.

However, to overcome the obstacles identified by research activities, reports and networks, and to roll out good practices and increase opportunities, additional coordinated support is needed, in particular from research and funding organisations. In February 2021, a one-day virtual workshop brought together stakeholders from a number of European countries, all with a common understanding that open access for academic books needs further attention and support. The prerequisites for the implementation of a well-functioning and sustainable open access book infrastructure are discussed below.

This position paper, undersigned by the workshop participants, identifies three legs of a policy stool that together will support the full transition to open access for academic books. It brings together people, technology and knowledge.

The signatures in the first version of this document include workshop delegates. The document will stay open (https://tinyurl.com/PPOpenBooks) for additional signatures. We will update this document (and version it) as appropriate.

News – Position Paper on OA Books: A call for action – News – Knowledge Exchange

“Previous Knowledge Exchange work on OA Monographs inspired experts Pierre Mounier (EHESS, OpenEdition, OPERAS), Graham Stone (Jisc) and Jeroen Sondervan (Utrecht University Library) to organise a community supporting investment in the OA Book infrastructure. In early 2021 they organised an online event that was facilitated by Knowledge Exchange and attended by key stakeholders, including representatives of cOAlition-S, SPARC-Europe, OASPA, OAPEN, DARIAH-EU, OpenAIRE, national funders, KE partner organisations and many more. 

As a result, the position paper ‘Investing in the Open Access Book infrastructure – A call for action’ has been published and is available as a PDF to download via Zenodo. There is also a Google doc version where we invite you to add your name to the growing list of signatories. We will update the PDF at regular intervals to ensure we have an up-to-date version of record.

Full details of this work have also been published via a blog post on the Jisc website.”

Investing in the Open Access Book infrastructure: a call for action – Jisc Research

Investing in the Open Access Book infrastructure: a call for action

 

This is a guest blog post by Pierre Mounier, Jeroen Sondervan, and Graham Stone.

Join Pierre Mounier (EHESS, OpenEdition, OPERAS), Jeroen Sondervan (Knowledge Exchange Open Access Working Group and Utrecht University Library), Graham Stone (Jisc), and key stakeholders in signing a position paper calling for investment in the open access book infrastructure (Zenodo version of record, Google doc version for signatories).

In June 2020, we published a blog Open Access to academic books: Working towards the “tipping point”, which reflected on the work of the Knowledge Exchange (KE) task and finish group’s work around open access books (see “Towards a Roadmap for Open Access Monographs: A Knowledge Exchange Report”. The blogpost led to a number of valuable discussions with stakeholders and key experts in the OA books community regarding the need to develop a joined up approach to the open infrastructure required for a successful transition to open access for books.

In light of forthcoming (and existing) policy on open access for books, the KE task and finish group agreed to extend their work on open access books by facilitating a partner exchange in February 2021. This one-day virtual workshop gathered key stakeholders, including representatives of cOAlition S, SPARC Europe, OASPA, OAPEN, DARIAH-EU, OpenAIRE, national funders, KE partner organizations and many more.

After a brief overview, the day used a workshop approach to develop a common understanding on the need for further attention and support for open access for academic books. Delegates explored the key issues in three parallel sessions (OA Book Watch, OA Book Network, OA Book infrastructure), before a Mentimeter poll was used to prioritise areas for further discussion. At the end of a long day of vibrant and fruitful discussion, we took stock of the contributions and discussed the idea of a position paper on open access books infrastructure. A writing group was formed and we started work on the position paper.

Openness Profile: Modelling research evaluation for open scholarship | Zenodo

“Knowledge Exchange (KE) has published the report ‘Openness Profile: Modelling research evaluation for open scholarship

The report describes mechanisms and approaches to improve and incentivize the recording, the evaluation and the recognition of contributions to Open Scholarship practice. The report presents the Openness Profile and how it can help address existing gaps in the assessment of open science.

The Openness Profile is a digital resource, a portfolio of a research contributor’s outputs and activities, accessible in a single place. Academic and non-academic open scholarship activities become visible and more easily recognised. The Openness Profile is modelling how research evaluation in an open science context can be improved. Expected benefits are highlighted and requirements listed. Recommendations are provided to various stakeholders how to establish the Openness Profile as research evaluation routine.

Over 80 individual stakeholders from 48 different organisations provided input to this report on research assessment and open scholarship. The work and writing were done by consultants Fiona Murphy and Phill Jones of MoreBrains Cooperative, together with the KE Open Scholarship Research Evaluation task & finish group….”

Ouvrir la Science – Activités de Knowledge Exchange | Partenaires pour améliorer le service à l’ESR

Knowledge Exchange (KE) brings together six organizations from six countries. Their common objective is to examine the issues related to research support and infrastructure and service development.

Members:

CNRS (France),
CSC (Finland),
DEIC (Denmark),
DFG   (Germany),
JISC (United Kingdom),
SURF (Netherlands).

Recent results:

About monographs;

A landscape study on open access and monographs –  DOI: 10.5281 / zenodo.815932
Knowledge Exchange Survey on Open Access Monographs – DOI: 10.5281 / zenodo.1475446
Towards a Roadmap for Open Access Monographs – DOI: 10.5281 / zenodo.3238545

Preprints

Accelerating scholarly communication – The transformative role of preprints – DOI: 10.5281 / zenodo.3357727

Economy of Open Science

Insights into the Economy of Open Scholarship: A Collection of Interviews – DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.2840171
Open Scholarship and the need for collective action – DOI 10.5281/zenodo.3454688

 

Knowledge Exchange Openness Profile – Knowledge Exchange

“Part of KE’s work on Open Scholarship aims to enhance the evaluation of research and researchers. This currently does not cover recognition of non-academic contributions to make Open Scholarship work, such as activities to open up and curate data for re-use, or making research results findable and available. Our approach is to raise more awareness on the lack of recognition in current evaluation practice and work towards a possible solution, through the development of an ‘Openness Profile’.

The KE Open Scholarship Research Evaluation task & finish group works on the awareness issue, listing all academic and non-academic contributions that are essential to Open Scholarship and should be recognised when evaluating research. The group also works on the Openness Profile, a tool that is meant to allow evaluation of currently ignored contributions that are essential for Open Scholarship. For the development of the Openness Profile we seek involvement of various key stakeholders and alignment with current identifiers such as DOI and ORCID iD.

By demonstrating the immaturity of current research evaluation practice, and by developing the Openness Profile tool, KE supports researchers as well as non-researchers to get credit for all their contributions that make Open Scholarship possible. Our ambition is that recognition of these essential activities becomes part of standard research evaluation routine….”

Knowledge Exchange Openness Profile – Knowledge Exchange

“Part of KE’s work on Open Scholarship aims to enhance the evaluation of research and researchers. This currently does not cover recognition of non-academic contributions to make Open Scholarship work, such as activities to open up and curate data for re-use, or making research results findable and available. Our approach is to raise more awareness on the lack of recognition in current evaluation practice and work towards a possible solution, through the development of an ‘Openness Profile’.

The KE Open Scholarship Research Evaluation task & finish group works on the awareness issue, listing all academic and non-academic contributions that are essential to Open Scholarship and should be recognised when evaluating research. The group also works on the Openness Profile, a tool that is meant to allow evaluation of currently ignored contributions that are essential for Open Scholarship. For the development of the Openness Profile we seek involvement of various key stakeholders and alignment with current identifiers such as DOI and ORCID iD.

By demonstrating the immaturity of current research evaluation practice, and by developing the Openness Profile tool, KE supports researchers as well as non-researchers to get credit for all their contributions that make Open Scholarship possible. Our ambition is that recognition of these essential activities becomes part of standard research evaluation routine….”

Introducing the Open Scholarship Framework at FORCE2019 – Knowledge Exchange

“As part of Knowledge Exchange’s (KE) work on Open Scholarship, Knowledge Exchange has developed a framework that maps the considerations for Open Scholarship across a variety of scales, phases and arenas. The three dimensions of the framework allow us to articulate the changes occurring in scholarly communications in tangible ways. 

The first dimension addresses the level of granularity (Macro, Meso, Micro) of actors; the second dimension is the phase of the research (Discovery, Planning, Project Phase, Dissemination); and the third dimension is the arena (Political, Economic, Social, Technological).

Having developed these concepts and conversations with several expert groups and projects, we held a pre-conference workshop, as part of the FORCE2019 conference, to engage a wider group of experts to test and further refine the Framework….”

Introducing the Open Scholarship Framework at FORCE2019 – Knowledge Exchange

“As part of Knowledge Exchange’s (KE) work on Open Scholarship, Knowledge Exchange has developed a framework that maps the considerations for Open Scholarship across a variety of scales, phases and arenas. The three dimensions of the framework allow us to articulate the changes occurring in scholarly communications in tangible ways. 

The first dimension addresses the level of granularity (Macro, Meso, Micro) of actors; the second dimension is the phase of the research (Discovery, Planning, Project Phase, Dissemination); and the third dimension is the arena (Political, Economic, Social, Technological).

Having developed these concepts and conversations with several expert groups and projects, we held a pre-conference workshop, as part of the FORCE2019 conference, to engage a wider group of experts to test and further refine the Framework….”

The Knowledge Exchange and Transitional Open Access for Smaller Publishers | Jisc scholarly communications

“The KE partner countries share the vision of Open Scholarship and immediate access to all publicly-funded research and have launched initiatives to help small publishers with their efforts to make a transition to Open Access and/or comply with the recommendations in Plan S. Below are some of the activities undertaken in five of the six partnering countries….”