Editors are Gatekeepers of Science, but Individual Editors Don’t Matter Much by Joshua Krieger, Kyle Myers, Ariel Dora Stern :: SSRN

 

As editors for academic journals, a select few individuals control the certification and dissemination of science. We examine editors’ influence on the content of their journals by unpacking the role of three major forces in publication. We term these “journal missions” (stable revealed preferences), “topic markets” (the aggregate supply of and demand for specific topics), and “scientific homophily” (via editorial gatekeeping). Focusing on a panel of leading biomedical journals, we find that missions and markets explain the vast majority of variation in published content. Conditional on these forces, the upper bound of the editor-homophily effect is statistically significant but practically unimportant. Our findings suggest that marginal changes in editorial board composition will not meaningfully impact a journal’s scientific content in the short run; however, our results do not rule out persistent or pervasive frictions in the publication process.

Job: Scholarly Communications Lead @ British Library

Scholarly Communications Lead

SALARY £39,000 (London) / £35,750 (Yorkshire)

FULL TIME

 PERMANENT

London, St Pancras or Boston Spa, Yorkshire

 

The British Library is seeking to appoint a Scholarly Communications Lead to help redefine its role as a provider of open access services to its global research audience and its partners in the UK and beyond. The post holder will maintain our scholarly communications strategy and work with colleagues across the Library and with external partners to implement it, in particular with regards to open access services (including preservation, discovery and enhanced analytics/text and data mining). While the focus of the British Library is on the UK, the scholarly communications is global and we areseeking new ways to contribute and sustain it in partnership with relevant national and international organisations. Working closely with the BL’s Head of Content and Research Services, the post holder will represent the Library internationally, offering an exciting opportunity to influence the development of the global scholarly communications and open access ecosystem. The post is be part of a team that includes similar roles focusing on data, discovery and repository services.

 

The ideal candidate will have in-depth knowledge and experience of the scholarly communication environment, in particular with regards to open access. They will have experience in interpreting the national and international scholarly communications landscape into policies with consideration of their impact on researchers and research organisations. The successful applicant will also have recent experience of scholarly communications workflows, and a broad understanding of the wider ecosystem, including relevant sector bodies and organisations, infrastructures and systems. The ability to confidently represent the British Library externally are as relevant to this position as the ability to work collaboratively and constructively in a matrix environment, including strong communication and influencing skills.

 

The British Library has a positive approach to working flexibly to accommodate the work/life balance and wellbeing of its employees by offering hybrid or remote working agreements alongside the Library’s flexible working hours scheme. The flexible working scheme itself could allow you to work your hours flexibly over the week and to take up to 5 days flexi leave in each 3 month period.

 

Other benefits include:

Employee Assistance Programme
Health Care Plan
Interest Free Season Ticket Loans
Cycle to Work Scheme
Subsidised staff restaurant

 

 

In return we offer a competitive salary and a number of excellent benefits.  Our pension scheme is one of the most valuable benefits we offer, as our staff can become members of the Alpha Pension Scheme where the Library contributes 20.9%. Another significant benefit the Library provides is the provision of a flexible working hours scheme which could allow you to work your hours flexibly over the week and to take up to 5 days flexi leave in a 3 month period. This is on top of 25 days holiday from entry and public and privilege holidays.

 

More about the British Library

As one of the world’s great libraries, our duty is to preserve the nation’s intellectual memory for the future. At the moment we have well over 150 million items, in most known languages, with three million new items added every year. We have manuscripts, maps, newspapers, magazines, prints and drawings, music scores, and patents. We operate the world’s largest document delivery service providing millions of items a year to customers all over the world. What matters to us is that we preserve the national memory and enable knowledge to be created both now and in the future.

For further information and to apply, please visit www.bl.uk/careers quoting vacancy ref: 03730

Head, Scholarly Communication & Data Services, UNLV University Libraries

“UNLV University Libraries seeks nominations and applications for an innovative and collaborative tenure-track/tenured faculty member to serve as the Head, Scholarly Communication & Data Services.

 

UNLV’s recent designation as a Research I, Very High Research Activity University (Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education) highlights the changing direction of the University with a new and growing emphasis on the research, scholarship and creative activities of its faculty and students. This direction presents exciting opportunities for the University Libraries to lead, partner on, and contribute to institutional aspirations and strategic initiatives. To better support this climate of innovation, in which faculty and students produce high-quality, widely disseminated, and influential research, the University Libraries will implement an organizational restructuring. to create a new Scholarly Communication & Data Services department. By aligning expertise in this new department, the University Libraries will establish organizational leadership for the development of programs and tools that support UNLV researchers in creating, sharing and demonstrating the impact of their work. Existing and future programmatic areas of focus for the department will include: …”

Owens | Scholarly Communication Outside the R1: Measuring Faculty and Graduate Student Knowledge and Interest at a Doctoral/Professional University | Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication

Abstract:  INTRODUCTION This study explores the baseline knowledge and interest of faculty and graduate students at a Carnegie-classified Doctoral/Professional University regarding different components of scholarly communication. METHODS A survey was developed to inquire about such topics as scholarly research, scholarly publishing, access to research, copyright, measuring impact, promoting research, and open-educational resources. Responses more significantly represented the humanities and social sciences versus the natural and applied sciences. RESULTS & DISCUSSION Results showed some hesitancy in embracing the open access (OA) publishing model, especially the use of article processing charges (APCs). Faculty largely collect original data and believe public access to original data is important, but this varies by college and includes almost one-fourth of faculty who do not feel that sharing data is important. The areas in which respondents expressed the highest level of knowledge correlate directly with the areas in which respondents expressed the most interest in professional development. Preferences in professional development modality were split between virtual and in-person sessions. With virtual sessions specifically, graduate students prefer synchronous sessions while faculty prefer pre-recorded sessions. CONCLUSION Respondents were generally aware of the library’s current scholarly communications services, but additional promotion and marketing is still needed, especially for colleges with the lowest areas of engagement.

 

Video Recording + Slides: LIBER 2021 Session #4: Open Access: a Case for Diversity and Inclusion

Presenter Slides are Available at:
https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5036355

 

Description

In the first presentation, Henk van den Hoogen and Timon Oefelein present the results of a unique collaborative Open Science initiative by the Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU), Springer Nature and several academic libraries in the Netherlands. This presentation provides background to the initiative, its rationale, objectives, and interdisciplinary make up, as well as summarising its key results and those from two large global researcher surveys to do with researchers’ motivations towards SDG research and usage trends of both OA and non-OA content. The presentation will be of interest to academic support librarians supporting researchers with publication and impact, as well as data librarians interested in innovative new SDG mapping technology, and bibliometric and members of the research assessment community interested in new ways of defining and capturing the societal impact of research.

Next, Jos Westerbeke will give a lightning talk about Federated Identity Management (FIM4L), one of LIBER’s Working Groups. In hist talk, they will provide insights and recommendations into authentication practices (single sign-on) for licensed materials and differing privacy issues. He will also discuss what to do when publishers delay implementing privacy enhancing changes and how the Working Group can help with setting up the right configuration for federated SSO access according to a broadly supported uniform library SSO method conforming to FIM4L principles.

Finally, Elisa Herrmann, Stefanie Paß, and Jana Rumler will provide insights from the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin, a small integrated research museum within the Leibniz Association. In their presentation, they will discuss the future activities for the implementation and promotion of Open Access in their institution, which include an in-house publication fund, the development of Green Open Access infrastructures, and the handling of OA publications in the acquisition process. As a smaller institution themselves, they will also pose the question of how big the gap is in the implementation of Open Access between large and small libraries. They will then identify possibilities to narrow the gap and, in the best case, create structures that will help smaller libraries to promote Open Access and Open Science in their institutions.

 

 

Practical Idealism: UC’s Approach to Open Access

MacKenzie Smith, University Librarian and Vice Provost of Digital Scholarship at the University of California, Davis, provides the following commentary on UC’s recent transformative agreements with Elsevier and other publishers.

Report on the OPERAS-P Workshop “The Future of Scholarly Communication”

The Future of Scholarly Communication

“The Future of Scholarly Communication” workshop was organised as a part of OPERAS Innovation Lab, which aims to facilitate communication and knowledge exchange within a field of digital humanities. The OPERAS Innovation Lab is led by IBL PAN, a partner in the OPERAS-P consortium and Executive Assembly member.

The main task of OPERAS Innovation Lab is to conduct user research in order to define the actual needs of the community with regards to open scholarly communication. Another important task is also analysing the existing innovative solutions in this field. These activities allow to improve, prepare – and sometimes prototype – services that respond to the needs of the community. 

The activities of the OPERAS Innovation Lab officially started within the WP6 “Innovation” in the OPERAS-P project. See the main findings and recommendations for stakeholders involved in scholarly communication in the final report “Future of Scholarly Communication. Forging an inclusive and innovative research infrastructure for scholarly communication in Social Sciences and Humanities” (DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.4922512) and in detailed task reports openly published on Zenodo

To further discuss and develop the future of scholarly communication, the OPERAS-P virtual workshop, “The Future of Scholarly Communication,” was held on February 24th–26th. During the three days of seminars, 341 participants discussed digital transformation challenges in humanities and social sciences (SSH).

The seminars were linked to a question: How can we effectively develop digital tools in order to apply novel research approaches, build interdisciplinary collaboration, raise the prestige of Open Access contributions and disseminate them outside academia? 

On each day two seminars were held. The two workshops on the first day were devoted to governance and business models. The panelists and participants discussed how new models of governance should embrace cultural and language diversity of research teams in SSH. They brought up the issue of institutional hierarchy within academia as opposed to more horizontal models specific for projects in digital humanities. The second panel concerned business models and publishing practices for academic books and monographs – an underdeveloped area of Open Access. 

On the second day, participants delved into bibliodiversity and multilingualism in SSH. In SSH disciplines, language is not only a tool but also an object of research. Using native languages is often crucial for these disciplines to achieve meaningful impact in local communities. Panelists debated  how digital tools should address this need and facilitate multilingual research and collaboration. The next panel was dedicated to processing academic publications as research data according to the FAIR principles (making them findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable). 

On the last day, panelists discussed the future of scholarly writing: publishing practices and scholars’ needs in the time of Open Access development. The starting point was a case study analysis of tools, services and digital projects enriched with interviews with researchers, librarians and publishers. The last panel was devoted to evaluation and assessment of academic writing. Its purpose was to exchange ideas for new models of evaluation that will take into account various types of academic achievements, such as monographs or digital editions and projects. 

“The Future of Scholarly Communication” workshop was organised as a part of OPERAS Innovation Lab, which aims to facilitate communication and knowledge exchange within a field of digital humanities. The OPERAS Innovation Lab is led by IBL PAN, a partner in the OPERAS Consortium.

You may find presentations from the seminars published here and the results were summed up in the report.


A short overview on the OPERAS Innovation Lab is given in this video presentation:

Maciej Maryl, Director, Digital Humanities Centre, IBL PAN” and Marta Blaszczynska, Coordinator, Digital Humanities Centre, IBL PAN” present the OPERAS Innovation Lab coordinated by the Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences (IBL PAN)! #OPERASLab


Funding OPERAS-P

Call for Chapters: Global View of Open Access and Scholarly Communications | IGI Global

“Call for Chapters

 

Proposals Submission Deadline: July 21, 2021
Full Chapters Due: October 3, 2021
Submission Date: October 3, 2021

 

 

Introduction

 
In an information and knowledge society, access to information and knowledge is a basic human right, making equitable and fair access to information and knowledge paramount. Open Access (OA) plays a huge role in addressing inequities as well as broad-based and inclusive scientific progresses. On the surface, it appears the number of publications discussing OA issues from various angles is on the rise. However, what is missing is a comprehensive assessment of the extent of OA implementation and a discussion of how to proceed in integrating OA issues from various possible players and stakeholders’ points of view. In addition, deliberate OA strategies that extend the traditional role of library and information environments and organizations through impact-driven and outcome-based results have not been well-articulated.
 

Objective

 
This book will aim to fill the needs of clear articulation of OA concepts and issues and demystify the state-of-the-art knowledge domain in the areas of OA and scholarly communications from diverse perspectives as well as implications for the information and knowledge society. The contributors elaborate on and reinforce the claims of educators that OA and Open Educational Resources (OER) will help them offer higher quality curriculum and instruction regardless of socioeconomic status or wherever they are in the world….”

ARL Joins Coalition for Diversity & Inclusion in Scholarly Communications – Association of Research Libraries

“The Association of Research Libraries (ARL), representing 125 member organizations in Canada and the United States, has joined the Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion in Scholarly Communications (C4DISC). ARL members are trusted sources of scholarly information and data, and constitute a significant share of the academic publishing market. A growing number of research libraries run their own publishing programs, house or partner with university presses, and collaborate with emerging scholar-led presses. The Association is proud to join publishing colleagues in C4DISC as part of a commitment to better understand the causes of, and to advance remedies for, racial inequity in scholarly communication. In joining, ARL endorses the C4DSIC Joint Statement of Principles.”

Disturbance of greedy publishing to academia

Questionable publications have been criticized for their greedy behaviour, yet have not been investigated their influence on academia quantitatively. Here, we probe the impact of questionable publications through the systematic and comprehensive analysis for the various participants in academia compared with their most similar unquestioned counterparts using billions of citation records: the brokers, e.g. journals and publishers, and prosumers, e.g. authors. Our analysis reveals that the questionable publishers decorate their citation score by the publisher-level self-citations to their journals while they control the journal-level self-citations to evade the evaluation of the journal indexing services; thus, it is hard to detect by conventional journal-level metrics, which our novel metric can capture. We also show that both novelty and influence are lower for the questionable publications than their counterparts implying the negative effect of questionable publications in the academic ecosystem, which provides a valuable basis for future policy-making.

OAPEN 2020 Stakeholder report | OAPEN

In 2020, the OAPEN Foundation celebrated its 10 year anniversary as an open infrastructure service for open access (OA) books, providing services to publishers, libraries and research funders. The mission of OAPEN to increase discoverability of OA books and to build trust around OA books has been leading us through a challenging year marked by the pandemic.

Today we would like to share our progress through the OAPEN 2020 Stakeholder report in which you can read about our key results and developments, including:

Highlights for 2020 – Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) and OAPEN Library
New initiatives – OAPEN Open Access Books Toolkit and Open Access Books Network (OABN)
Community engagement
Project activities
Governance
Financial Overview
Outlook for 2021

Game theory and scholarly publishing: premises for an agreement around open access

Actors in research and scientific publishing are gradually joining the Open-Access (OA) movement, which is gaining momentum to become nowadays at the heart of scientific policies in high-income countries. The rise of OA generates profound changes in the chain of production and dissemination of knowledge. Free access to peer-reviewed research methods and results has contributed to the dynamics of science observed in recent years. The modes of publication and access have also evolved; the classic model, based on journal subscriptions is gradually giving way to new economic models that have appeared with the arrival of OA. The objective of this article is twofold. First, propose a model for the publishing market based on the literature as well as on changes in open science policies. Second, analyze publishing strategies of publishers and institutions. To do so, we relied on game theory in economics. Results show that in the short term, the publisher’s equilibrium strategy is to adopt a hybridpublishing model, while the institutions’ equilibrium strategy is to publish in OA. This equilibrium is not stable and that in the medium/long term, the two players will converge on an OA publishing strategy. The analysis of the equilibrium in mixed-strategies confirms this result.

OPERAS report “Future of Scholarly Communication. Forging an inclusive and innovative research infrastructure for scholarly communication in Social Sciences and Humanities” | Zenodo

Avanço, Karla, Balula, Ana, B?aszczy?ska, Marta, Buchner, Anna, Caliman, Lorena, Clivaz, Claire, … Wieneke, Lars. (2021, June 29). Future of Scholarly Communication . Forging an inclusive and innovative research infrastructure for scholarly communication in Social Sciences and Humanities. Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.5017705

 

This report discusses the scholarly communication issues in Social Sciences and Humanities that are relevant to the future development and functioning of OPERAS. The outcomes collected here can be divided into two groups of innovations regarding 1) the operation of OPERAS, and 2) its activities. The “operational” issues include the ways in which an innovative research infrastructure should be governed (Chapter 1) as well as the business models for open access publications in Social Sciences and Humanities (Chapter 2). The other group of issues is dedicated to strategic areas where OPERAS and its services may play an instrumental role in providing, enabling, or unlocking innovation: FAIR data (Chapter 3), bibliodiversity and multilingualism in scholarly communication (Chapter 4), the future of scholarly writing (Chapter 5), and quality assessment (Chapter 6). Each chapter provides an overview of the main findings and challenges with emphasis on recommendations for OPERAS and other stakeholders like e-infrastructures, publishers, SSH researchers, research performing organisations, policy makers, and funders. Links to data and further publications stemming from work concerning particular tasks are located at the end of each chapter.

Balula and Leão (2021) Multilingualism within Scholarly Communication… | JLIS.it

Balula, A., & Leão, D. (2021). Multilingualism within Scholarly Communication in SSH. A literature review. JLIS.It, 12(2), 88–98. https://doi.org/10.4403/jlis.it-12672

Abstract

It is undeniable that scholarly publication is boosted nowadays by the use of the English language, but this does not (and cannot) mean that the other languages have to be obliterated as scientific and cultural agents, equally valid and indispensable. Therefore, multilingualism is an expression of bibliodiversity that has to be protected and cherished, particularly in the area of Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH), a field in which culturally and societally relevant studies are made in local languages, when approaching areas such as cultural heritage, education, migration, public administration. The main goal of this paper is to present a literature review in order to identify the main aspects influencing language selection and the use of multilingualism within scholarly communication, allowing for putting forward recommendations for future initiatives aiming at enhancing multilingualism, particularly in connection with the opportunities deriving from Open Science.