Overwhelming support for Ukrainian editorial staff | EIFL

“Since the start of the war, EIFL has been involved in various activities supporting Ukrainian librarians and researchers. And so we welcomed the formation of SUES – Supporting Ukrainian Editorial Staff – in April 2022, and were among the first to join the initiative….

SUES, a coalition of organizations engaged in scholarly communications, was formed to fill this gap, to help journal editors and publishers with day-to-day activities, infrastructure, international visibility, and by building stronger relationships for the future. Led by OPERAS, SUES includes EIFL, the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Open Access Publishing in European Networks (OAPEN), Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB), the Polish Institute of Literary Research – IBL-PAN, the Association of European University Presses, and Soutien à l’Édition Savante en Ukraine (SESU), which is a group of more than 30 professionals from the French academic publishing sector. …

The results far exceeded expectations. In less than two months, from 6 May to 24 June, SUES raised 73,000 Euros – enough money to support all 45 journals. The three main sources of funding were individuals donating through the crowdfunding platform Wemakeit (over 20,000 Euros); publishers and the library community through the Sven Fund of Knowledge Unlatched/Wiley (36,000 Euros), and the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research, which donated 16,500 Euros through its Open Science National Fund. …

Thanks to SUES support, the Journal of Sociology: Theory, methods and marketing has been able to publish its second issue for 2022. The articles, which cover experiences of pandemic and war, institutional emergency conditions and stress perception, have been uploaded to the journal’s open access website. …”

Safeguarding science in the wake of conflict – International Science Council

“Full adoption of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) recommendation on open science is highlighted as a pathway for enabling displaced scholars to continue their work, and supporting the (re)development of fragile science systems. Crucially, stakeholders must work together to develop sustainable frameworks in higher education and research systems for a more predictable and effective approach to the phases of preparedness, response and rebuilding in the aftermath of conflict or disaster….”

1st International Conference “Open Science and Innovation in Ukraine 2022”

“The State Scientific and Technical Library of Ukraine under the auspices and with the support of the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine has the honor to invite to participate in the 1-st international conference “Open Science and Innovation in Ukraine 2022″, which is approved by the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine and will be held with the support of national, international organizations, associations and other sponsors, which will take place on October 27-28, 2022 in Kyiv in an online format….”

Action Steps For Rebuilding Ukraine’s Science, Research, and Innovation | National Academies

“We, the leadership of the Polish Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina, the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences and Letters, the ALLEA European Federation of Academies of Sciences and Humanities, and the Royal Society of the United Kingdom, met in Warsaw, Poland on June 2, 2022. The aim of the meeting was to discuss and agree on steps to build a strong science, innovation, research, and training system in Ukraine. Our discussions recognized the challenges in making progress given the still ongoing invasion by Russian forces, but also were driven by an understanding that rebuilding science and research in Ukraine, are critical to ensure its long-term prosperity and sovereignty. As such, we strongly encourage that while global leaders develop programs and make funding commitments for Ukraine, there should be a focus on rebuilding a modern and globally integrated science and research system. The 10 actions articulated below are practical steps that can be taken by scientific communities of our countries, and also those around the world. While some of the actions can be achieved in the near term, others will depend on the evolving military and security situation in Ukraine. The list is subject to expansion and readjustment, and takes into consideration past experiences in dealing with war-affected countries. …

5. Provide remote, free access to scholarly journals to Ukrainian research institutions….”

Wikipedia fights Russian order to remove Ukraine war information | Reuters

“The Wikimedia Foundation, which owns Wikipedia, has filed an appeal against a Moscow court decision demanding that it remove information related to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, arguing that people have a right to know the facts of the war….”

Saving Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Online | webinar | May 13, 2022 | San José State University, US

“We invite you to join the SJSU King Library and special guest speakers Anna E. Kijas from Tufts University and Quinn Dombrowski from Stanford University to learn the story behind the grassroots organization Saving Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Online (SUCHO). Time May 13, 2022 12:00 PM in Pacific Time (US and Canada)”

Supporting Ukrainian Editorial Staff: Crowdfunding Campaign

The invasion of Ukraine on 24 February 2022 and the expansion of the war zone across the country have had a significant impact on the country’s scientific activity. Much civilian infrastructure has been destroyed, including higher education and research institutions.

Through a number of programmes, such as Science for Ukraine, support is being provided to Ukrainian researchers, but this support has not been extended to staff working alongside researchers in knowledge generation: the librarians, editors, technicians, and administrative staff at universities, research institutes, and other infrastructures.

Yet preserving the knowledge, expertise, and knowledge-sharing capabilities of these scientific communities is of vital importance.

What can we do to help?

Supporting Ukrainian Editorial Staff (SUES) is an initiative by various European institutions, infrastructures, and organizations (Institute of Literary Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences [IBL-PAN], OPERAS, Directory of Open Access Journals [DOAJ], Directory of Open Access Books [DOAB], Electronic Information for Libraries [EIFL], Association of European University Presses [AEUP]), as well as a number of French scientific publishers, aimed at supporting scientific communication in Ukraine and helping scholarly journals and academic publishers to continue their publishing activities.

Did you know that there are more than 1,000 academic journals in Ukraine? Over 700 of these are open access journals published via the URAN platform. The publication of academic books is also extensive, with more than 20 Ukrainian university presses currently distributed via the CEEOL portal. These publications, in fields ranging from physics to literature via history, sociology, and biology, are key vehicles for the communication of knowledge generated by Ukrainian researchers. The editors, reviewers, typesetters, proofreaders, translators, and technical and administrative staff working in the various publishing centres need your support to continue their mission: to share and disseminate knowledge.

A questionnaire is being circulated around Ukrainian journals and publishers to help accurately identify their needs in terms of financial and technical support. The requests received so far relate primarily to remuneration for editorial work, to enable them to continue their work and to publish the next issue of their journal or their next book. The purpose of this campaign is to help 10 journals or publishers to keep publishing. In the long term, the project is also aimed at strengthening relationships and exchanging knowledge to ensure the international presence and visibility of Ukrainian academic publishers. Thanks to your contribution, Ukrainian scholarly journals and scientific publishers will be able to continue sharing knowledge.

A crowdfunding campaign is being run from Wednesday, 4 May to Monday, 6 June 2022, to raise money to help Ukrainian journals who have requested assistance from the coalition. Unique compensation will be offered in return for any financial support offered.

Link to the crowdfunding webpage: https://wemakeit.com/projects/support-to-ukrainian-editors

Contacts

Helping Ukrainian Scholars, One Book at a Time – Internet Archive Blogs

“The Internet Archive is proud to partner with Better World Books to support Ukrainian students and scholars. With a $1 donation at checkout during your purchase at betterworldbooks.com, you will help provide verifiable information to Ukrainian scholars all over the world through Wikipedia.

Since 2019, the Internet Archive has worked with the Wikipedia community to strengthen citations to published literature. Working in collaboration with Wikipedians and data scientists, Internet Archive has linked hundreds of thousands of citations in Wikipedia to books in our collection, offering Wikipedia editors and readers single-click access to the verifiable facts contained within libraries. 

Recently, our engineers analyzed the citations in the Ukrainian-language Wikipedia, and were able to connect citations to more than 17,000 books that have already been digitized by the Internet Archive, such as the page for ???????? (English translation: Genomics), which links to a science textbook published in 2002. Through this work, we discovered that there are more than 25,000 additional books that we don’t have in our collection—and that’s where you can help! …”

How the Wayback Machine Is Saving Digital Ukraine – IEEE Spectrum

“When the Ukrainian invasion began, the Internet Archive launched several efforts to capture the Ukrainian Internet. Its archivists launched a high-volume crawl through hundreds of thousands of websites ending in “.ua.” They selected specific sites to archive as completely as possible, including government, education, and library sites. And they targeted journalism, particularly Ukrainian news sites and aggregators. The organization has also been supporting others working to save Ukraine’s digital resources, including SUCHO (Saving Ukrainian Cultural Heritage Online) and the Archive Team.

Mark Graham, director of the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine, explained this dive into Ukraine’s Internet and how it differs from the Wayback Machine’s usual approach to preserving digital history. …”

Preserving Ukraine’s Cultural Heritage Online | Tufts Now

“The effort started in late February, just days after Russia invaded Ukraine, when Kijas mused on Twitter about launching a project to save digitized music collections, her area of expertise. The project soon attracted more than 1,000 volunteers from around the world—librarians, archivists, researchers, and programmers, some of them fluent in Ukrainian—and is now co-organized by Kijas, Quinn Dombrowski of Stanford University, and Sebastian Majstorovic of the Austrian Center for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage.

The group is crawling websites, digital exhibits, and open access publications of Ukrainian cultural institutions with automated computer programs that search sites and collect data. The group also manually archives pages and files. Volunteers have added more than 10 terabytes of data to servers outside the country and saved almost 15,000 files to the Internet Archive,  where it has a collection. (One terabyte is equal to 1,000 gigabytes, or about the amount of data that could be stored on 16 iPhones.)…”

Universities UK statement on Ukraine: 3 March

“We do not support the application of blanket academic boycotts that prevent academics collaborating with other academics as a means of protest against the actions of their governments. We are therefore advising our members to make decisions about whether to continue collaborations on a case-by-case basis, informed both by UK Government guidance and appropriate due diligence. We have requested the government’s support for universities as they do this….”

Universities should not carry out ‘blanket academic boycotts’ of Russia

“Universities should not carry out blanket boycotts of Russian academics over the invasion of Ukraine, a leading sector body has said.

Universities UK (UUK), which represents 140 universities across the United Kingdom, said in a statement on the situation in Ukraine, published on Thursday, that it does “not support the application of blanket academic boycotts that prevent academics collaborating with other academics as a means of protest against the actions of their governments”. …”

Journal editor explains ban on manuscripts from Russian institutions – Retraction Watch

“First of all, let me say, because there is some misunderstanding circulating in some social media regarding the issue you asked me for information, that the editors of the Journal of Molecular Structure did not decide to implement any sort of ban to articles submitted by Russian authors. This would be something I, or my colleagues, could never accept. Our Russian colleagues, as all our colleagues from all around the world, deserve us maximum respect.

However, it was decided by the editors of the journal to not consider manuscripts authored by scientists working at Russian Institutions, in result of the humanitarian implications emerging from the invasion of Ukraine by the Russian Federation. This position is temporary and shall apply until the refugees (whoever they are, Ukrainians, Russians, or of any other nationality) have conditions to return to their homes, their jobs, and join their families….”