[2208.08426] “We Need a Woman in Music”: Exploring Wikipedia’s Values on Article Priority

Abstract:  Wikipedia — like most peer production communities — suffers from a basic problem: the amount of work that needs to be done (articles to be created and improved) exceeds the available resources (editor effort). Recommender systems have been deployed to address this problem, but they have tended to recommend work tasks that match individuals’ personal interests, ignoring more global community values. In English Wikipedia, discussion about Vital articles constitutes a proxy for community values about the types of articles that are most important, and should therefore be prioritized for improvement. We first analyzed these discussions, finding that an article’s priority is considered a function of 1) its inherent importance and 2) its effects on Wikipedia’s global composition. One important example of the second consideration is balance, including along the dimensions of gender and geography. We then conducted a quantitative analysis evaluating how four different article prioritization methods — two from prior research — would affect Wikipedia’s overall balance on these two dimensions; we found significant differences among the methods. We discuss the implications of our results, including particularly how they can guide the design of recommender systems that take into account community values, not just individuals’ interests.

 

[2208.08426] “We Need a Woman in Music”: Exploring Wikipedia’s Values on Article Priority

Abstract:  Wikipedia — like most peer production communities — suffers from a basic problem: the amount of work that needs to be done (articles to be created and improved) exceeds the available resources (editor effort). Recommender systems have been deployed to address this problem, but they have tended to recommend work tasks that match individuals’ personal interests, ignoring more global community values. In English Wikipedia, discussion about Vital articles constitutes a proxy for community values about the types of articles that are most important, and should therefore be prioritized for improvement. We first analyzed these discussions, finding that an article’s priority is considered a function of 1) its inherent importance and 2) its effects on Wikipedia’s global composition. One important example of the second consideration is balance, including along the dimensions of gender and geography. We then conducted a quantitative analysis evaluating how four different article prioritization methods — two from prior research — would affect Wikipedia’s overall balance on these two dimensions; we found significant differences among the methods. We discuss the implications of our results, including particularly how they can guide the design of recommender systems that take into account community values, not just individuals’ interests.

 

A call for volunteers: German, Korean, Portuguese, Turkish – DOAJ News Service

“DOAJ has a network of skilled, voluntary Associate Editors and Editors who spend a few hours a week processing new journal applications. Would you like to join us? We are now recruiting volunteers who understand German, Korean, Portuguese and Turkish. (You do not have to be a native speaker.) You must also be proficient in written and spoken English.

As a DOAJ volunteer, you will do a few hours of voluntary, unpaid work a week. You will receive training materials to help you carry out your duties. Your work will directly contribute to the quality, reputation, and prominence of open access scholarly publishing around the globe….”

Unjournal: Call for participants and research – “Unjournal”+ EA & global priority research groups

“I am David Reinstein (Senior Economist at Rethink Priorities, following 15 years in academia) and a supporter of open science (BITSS Catalyst). I am writing with an open call for committee members, board members, reviewers, and suggestions of relevant work for a new peer-review initiative (not a publication!) called The Unjournal.

The Unjournal team is building a system for credible, public, journal-independent feedback and evaluation of research. Peer review can be slow; our system will enable researchers to get more prompt, efficient, and substantive feedback and advice, with metrics and signals of quality. The Unjournal will also help researchers advance, promote, and improve their work, while still allowing them to submit it to traditional journals at any point in the process….

Briefly, the Unjournal’s process (proposed and under-discussion):

Identify or invite contributions of relevant research that is publicly hosted on any open platform or archive in any format (we can help facilitate hosting and help you get a time-stamped DOI).
Pay reviewers to evaluate and give careful feedback on this work. Elicit quantifiable and comparable metrics of research quality as credible measures of value.
Publicly post and link all reviews of the work. Award financial prizes for work judged to be the strongest.

Note: We will make some clearly stated exceptions for ECRs, allowing them to hide negative reviews.
Note: We are likely to ask reviewers to remain anonymous (unsigned reviews), but this is under consideration

Aim to be as transparent as possible in these processes. …”

Call for new Steering Committee Members – Open Repositories

“The Open Repositories Steering Committee (ORSC) is pleased to announce that we are opening nominations for standing members to join the OR Steering Committee.

ORSC manages the annual Open Repositories conference and consists of 12 standing members (who serve three-year terms) as well as the chairs of the host and program committees for the annual conferences.

We are inviting nominations, including self-nominations. The nomination deadline is July 30th 2022.”

ASAPbio Crowd preprint review 2022 sign-up form

“Following our trial last year, ASAPbio is running further preprint crowd review activities in 2022. Our goal is to provide an engaging environment for researchers to participate in providing feedback on preprints and support public reviews for preprints.

In 2022, we will be coordinating public reviews for different disciplines. We are pleased to say that we are collaborating with SciELO Preprints to also coordinate the review of preprints in Portuguese. This year we will cover the following disciplines:

– Cell biology preprints from bioRxiv (English)
– Biochemistry preprints from bioRxiv (English)
– Infectious diseases preprints from SciELO Preprints (Portuguese)

**This form is for reviewers who will participate in the review of preprints from bioRXiv, to sign up for the review of SciELO Preprints in Portuguese, please complete this form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd0wrAa7FLrw8I1j5p9mysWrstehPqDqsn9UPjUbqrwRnQU-A/viewform

We invite researchers in the disciplines above to join our crowd preprint review activities, and particularly encourage early career researchers to participate. The activities will run for three months, from mid May to August 2022….”

Call for Advisory Committee Participation · Open Grants

“Planning for Open Grants: Fostering a Transparent and Accessible National Research Infrastructure, an initiative led by the University of Florida, has undertaken an 18-month effort to establish a blueprint for implementation of a repository of openly accessible grant proposals and funding guidelines. Bringing experts together is crucial to the success of this initiative, both to envision the potential benefits as well as potential barriers. 12 advisors—including grant funders, research administrators, librarians, archivists, scholars, policy experts, and technologists—have joined the project to engage in conversation and provide feedback on deliverables throughout the award period.

We seek 8 additional advisors to provide their unique perspectives on this endeavor, rooted in individual lived experience and professional interest. Advisors will be paid a $1000 honorarium and $1000 travel stipend and commit to:

attending a 1.5 day in-person meeting at the University of Florida in 2022 (tentatively May or June),
participating in 2-3 virtual follow-up discussions, and
providing feedback on deliverables….”

Three crowdsourcing opportunities with the British Library | Digital scholarship blog @ BL

Digital Curator Dr Mia Ridge writes, In case you need a break from whatever combination of weather, people and news is around you, here are some ways you can entertain yourself (or the kids!) while helping make collections of the British Library more findable, or help researchers understand our past. You might even learn something or make new discoveries along the way!

Wikidata and open infrastructure: a request for participation

“For the past month we’ve been exploring the potential of Wikidata as a public knowledge base for information about open infrastructure and its financial components. Wikidata, a sister project of Wikipedia, is a dynamic space with exciting room for growth and development.

We aim to help increase the transparency, accessibility, and availability of high-quality information on open infrastructure in a reusable, participatory, open fashion….”

Call for new Steering Committee members – Open Repositories

“The Open Repositories Steering Committee (ORSC) is pleased to announce that we are opening nominations for standing members to join the OR Steering Committee.

ORSC manages the annual Open Repositories conference and consists of a maximum of 12 standing members (who serve three-year terms) as well as the chairs of the host and program committees for the annual conferences.

We have two open slots for standing members, and we are inviting nominations, including self-nominations. The nomination deadline is July 30th 2021….”

How to help – Free Journal Network

“The Free Journal Network advocates Fair Open Access. Here is how you can help us with our mission.

Donations

The Free Journal Network currently receives no public funds or government grants of any kind. We depend exclusively on the financial support of like-minded individuals as well as universities, libraries, and other organizations who support our mission. If you represent a university, library, or other organization that would like to support our mission financially, please e-mail info@freejournals.org.

Volunteer

If you are interested in supporting our mission by volunteering your time and expertise, and possibly becoming a board member in future, please email us at info@freejournals.org.

If you know of a good candidate journal, please let us know….”

Meet the Activist Archivists Saving the Internet From the Digital Dustbin | Discover Magazine

“Archive Team, a self-described “loose collective of rogue archivists, programmers, writers and loudmouths dedicated to saving our digital heritage,” is a volunteer organization that monitors fading or at-risk sites before they’ve vanished completely. When Google announced the end of failed social network Google+, the collective saved 1.56 petabytes of its data in under four weeks.

Much of what Archive Team saves is then stored within the Internet Archive, which anyone can use to digitize whatever they feel is important. But the Wayback Machine uses bots to crawl the web and take snapshots as they go, while the Archive Team is laser focused on preserving endangered sites. It’s the difference between slowly amassing a huge library and trying to save every book from a specific collection that’s about to catch fire.     To accomplish this, anyone can donate bandwidth and hard drive space to the “Warrior,” an archiving application that systematically downloads sites the group is worried about. Those downloads are then sent to the Archive Team’s servers before being moved to the safety of the Internet Archive. The Warrior’s current projects include the soon-to-shutter Freewebs, a hosting service that’s housed 55 million webpages since 2001, as well as certain subreddits that have been quarantined, often the first step discussion website Reddit takes before deleting an entire forum. The content of conversations within those communities might help researchers understand how, for example, extremist viewpoints spread online….”

Launch of Translate Science – Translate Science Blog

“Translate Science is an open volunteer group interested in improving the translation of the scientific literature. The group has come together to support work on tools, services and advocate for translating science….

Translated scientific articles open science to regular people, science enthusiasts, activists, advisors, trainers, consultants, architects, doctors, journalists, planners, administrators, technicians and scientists. Such a lower barrier to participating in science is especially important on topics such as climate change, environment, agriculture and health. The easier knowledge transfer goes both ways: people benefiting from scientific knowledge and people having knowledge scientists should know. Translations thus help both science and society. They aid innovation and tackling the big global challenges in the fields of climate change, agriculture and health….”

LibriVox Celebrates 15,000 Audiobooks! | LibriVox LibriVox Celebrates 15,000 Audiobooks! | free public domain audiobooks

“In 2020, LibriVox welcomed an amazing amount of new volunteers, one of the few positive side-effects of the Covid19 pandemic. Consequently, we could finish many more books than usual, so it took us only 9 months since the last milestone to celebrate LibriVox audiobook # 15.000!…”