Data Sharing RFP 17Dec2019 – Google Docs

“U.S. fisheries rely on data generated by fishing activities to manage fish populations and meet sustainability mandates. This includes selectively sharing data across many users and communities – scientists, managers, industry, and law enforcement – as well as among states, federal agencies, inter-state fishery commissions, and international management bodies.  As digital tools increase the volume, submission frequency, and complexity of fisheries data, data sharing agreements among NOAA Fisheries and its many partners need to consistently reflect best practices for data security and access, while still adapting to specific use cases. Intertidal Agency is seeking an expert individual, firm, or organization to: conduct a review of existing data sharing agreements, recommend approaches to continue and areas for improvement, provide guidance on when and why to have an agreement or not, and develop a library of language that is usable by both regulatory and technical staff. 

Applicants need not have prior experience with fisheries but should be knowledgeable about the structure and impacts of legal agreements concerning data sharing and management in other sectors. Specific experience with data sharing programs that satisfy state, federal, and international requirements is preferred. Intertidal Agency can provide content expertise as needed and NOAA Fisheries staff will serve as project advisors….”

Data Sharing RFP 17Dec2019 – Google Docs

“U.S. fisheries rely on data generated by fishing activities to manage fish populations and meet sustainability mandates. This includes selectively sharing data across many users and communities – scientists, managers, industry, and law enforcement – as well as among states, federal agencies, inter-state fishery commissions, and international management bodies.  As digital tools increase the volume, submission frequency, and complexity of fisheries data, data sharing agreements among NOAA Fisheries and its many partners need to consistently reflect best practices for data security and access, while still adapting to specific use cases. Intertidal Agency is seeking an expert individual, firm, or organization to: conduct a review of existing data sharing agreements, recommend approaches to continue and areas for improvement, provide guidance on when and why to have an agreement or not, and develop a library of language that is usable by both regulatory and technical staff. 

Applicants need not have prior experience with fisheries but should be knowledgeable about the structure and impacts of legal agreements concerning data sharing and management in other sectors. Specific experience with data sharing programs that satisfy state, federal, and international requirements is preferred. Intertidal Agency can provide content expertise as needed and NOAA Fisheries staff will serve as project advisors….”

A Data Sharing Renaissance: Music to My Ears! – Office of Science Policy

“When world famous cellist, Yo-Yo Ma, visited the NIH campus, he shared a story from the history of music, in which the peak of stringed instrument quality occurred in the late 17th century at a time of great collaboration and sharing of knowledge. When instrument makers began to compete, all of that changed: secrets of craftsmanship were held close and the quality of instruments plummeted. This decline lasted, according to Ma, until the 20th century, when again the free-flow of knowledge resumed. NIH Director Francis Collins noted, “There’s a lesson here about science.”

Data sharing is important. It is critical to continued progress in science, to maximize our investment in research, and to ensure the highest levels of transparency and rigor in science. But data sharing is a means to an end, not itself an end goal and, as such, needs to be done thoughtfully, in a way that fulfills the vision and mission of NIH and continues the advancement of treatments for disease and improvement of human health. NIH has long been on the forefront of making access to the results of our research accessible and has described our vision for expanding access to publications and data both in the 2015 NIH Plan for Increasing Access to Scientific Publications and Digital Scientific and in the 2018 Strategic Plan for Data Science….

Today, NIH released a notice in its Guide to Grants and Contracts that seeks public input on the key policy provisions that NIH is considering for inclusion in a future draft policy aimed at replacing NIH’s existing Data Sharing Policy. By obtaining robust stakeholder feedback we can help ensure that the future NIH policy will promote opportunities for data management and sharing while allowing flexibility for various data types, sharing platforms, and strategies.  The information stakeholders provide can also assist us in developing streamlined approaches that could potentially reduce unnecessary administrative burdens….”

RFP: Review OER in Your Discipline –CUNY Teaching and Learning Center

“The Teaching and Learning Center and the Graduate Center Library invite individual or group proposals from CUNY Graduate Center students for literature reviews of OER in specific disciplines. We will pay $1000 per discipline, and can fund up to five distinct projects in the Spring 2018 semester.

Each project will result in a report of 1000-2000 words that evaluates Open Educational Resources in a specific discipline with attention to breadth and depth of coverage, inclusiveness of emergent voices and arguments, and appropriateness for deployment in an undergraduate classroom. Funded projects will be developed with support from staff at the Teaching and Learning Center and Graduate Center Library, and grantees will be expected to attend up to three meetings during the Spring semester to report on their progress. Final reports will be due June 1, 2018, and will be published in Summer 2018 on Visible Pedagogy.  

To apply, submit a single PDF by email to tlc@gc.cuny.edu by midnight on February 12, 2018….”