WorldFAIR: Global cooperation on FAIR data policy and practice – Kick-Off Meeting introduces major new initiative to advance implementation of the FAIR data principles – CODATA, The Committee on Data for Science and Technology

“The WorldFAIR project held a successful kick-off meeting online on 9 June 2022, with representatives from the European Commission and all nineteen participating organisations from Europe and beyond.

The WorldFAIR project is a major new global collaboration between partners from thirteen countries across Africa, Australasia, Europe, and North and South America.  WorldFAIR will advance implementation of the FAIR data principles, in particular those for Interoperability, by developing a cross-domain interoperability framework and recommendations for FAIR assessment in a set of eleven disciplines or cross-disciplinary research areas….”

Many researchers were not compliant with their published data sharing statement: mixed-methods study – Journal of Clinical Epidemiology

Abstract:  Objectives

To analyse researchers’ compliance with their Data Availability Statement (DAS) from manuscripts published in open access journals with the mandatory DAS.

 

Study Design and Setting

We analyzed all articles from 333 open-access journals published during January 2019 by BioMed Central. We categorized types of DAS. We surveyed corresponding authors who wrote in DAS that they would share the data. A consent to participate in the study was sought for all included manuscripts. After accessing raw data sets, we checked whether data were available in a way that enabled re-analysis.

 

Results

Of 3556 analyzed articles, 3416 contained DAS. The most frequent DAS category (42%) indicated that the datasets are available on reasonable request. Among 1792 manuscripts in which DAS indicated that authors are willing to share their data, 1670 (93%) authors either did not respond or declined to share their data with us. Among 254 (14%) of 1792 authors who responded to our query for data sharing, only 122 (6.8%) provided the requested data.

 

Conclusion

Even when authors indicate in their manuscript that they will share data upon request, the compliance rate is the same as for authors who do not provide DAS, suggesting that DAS may not be sufficient to ensure data sharing.

New Guidance to Ensure Federally Funded Research Data Equitably Benefits All of America | The White House

“To help ensure that access is shared equitably by all Americans, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) has been working for nearly a decade to ensure that Federal agencies with research and development budgets of at least $100 million develop plans to deposit Federally funded data into online digital repositories.

To continue this effort, today OSTP is releasing the report Guidance on Desirable Characteristics of Data Repositories for Federally Funded Research. This guidance contains clearly defined desirable characteristics for two classes of online research data repositories: a general class appropriate for all types of Federally funded data—including free and easy access—and a specific class that has special considerations for the sharing of human data, including additional data security and privacy considerations. Federal agencies can use this guidance to provide more consistent information to their research communities about sharing Federally funded data with the public. 

Agencies can also use this guidance to ensure uniformity as they invest in their own digital repository infrastructure and to make their research data resources more findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable. It is expected that this guidance will not be static, but rather, will be updated as needed, as new modes of data storage and management emerge and agency needs evolve.  Ultimately, this guidance—along with the agency efforts detailed in OSTP’s recent report to Congress—will help make Federally funded research data more accessible to the American public. The release of this guidance is one of many steps that OSTP is taking to advance equitable delivery of research and strengthen Federal public access policies….”

Desirable Characteristics of Data Repositories for Federally Funded Research

“A key element of the required data management plans is specification of the digital, online, public access data repository or repositories researchers will use for preserving, maintaining, and providing access to Federally supported research data. While some agencies designate specific repositories to be used for particular types of data (e.g., genomic data, topographical data) or a particular type of research (e.g., Arctic research, social sciences research), for much Federally funded research, the selection of a suitable repository is delegated to the researcher or their institutions. Some agencies provide information to assist researchers in the selection of data repositories. However, this information is inconsistent across agencies, including among those that support research in similar or related disciplines. Until now, agencies had not identified the desirable characteristics of data repositories on which to base their assistance to researchers and their institutions. To improve the management and sharing of data from Federally funded research, agencies agreed to leverage the SOS to identify a consistent set of desirable characteristics for data repositories that all agencies could incorporate into the instructions they provide to the research community for selecting data repositories. By establishing common expectations, agencies intend to reduce the complexity for the research community–including investigators, program officers, data managers, librarians, and others–in complying with Federal data sharing policies. Federal agencies can also use this set of characteristics to develop or identify suitable repositories for particular types of data. To carry out this work, agencies within the SOS drew upon existing expertise and experience with data management and sharing. They also reviewed existing criteria promulgated by non-governmental organizations involved in the certification of data repositories (e.g., International Standards Organization, International Science Council). Agencies also took into account input received on a draft set of characteristics issued for public comment in January 2020 (Box 1)….

This guidance document presents the set of desirable characteristics for repositories agreed to by Federal agencies, reflecting the input that OSTP and SOS received and evaluated. It addresses a nearterm need to provide greater consistency across agencies, recognizing that future steps will be needed to better coordinate data storage and management to make data from Federally funded research more findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR), 4 as well as more equitable, inclusive, secure, and trustworthy. The endeavor to improve public access to Federally-supported research makes for a more open government, facilitates evidence-based decision making, and yields greater returns on Americans’ investments in R&D. This guidance document constitutes one set of tools that agencies can use to advance those goals….”

 

Gearing Up for 2023 Part II: Implementing the NIH Data Management and Sharing Policy – NIH Extramural Nexus

“NIH has a long history of developing consent language and, as such, our team worked across the agency – and with you! – to develop a new resource that shares best practices for developing informed consents to facilitate data/biospecimen storage and sharing for future use.  It also provides modifiable sample language that investigators and IRBs can use to assist in the clear communication of potential risks and benefits associated with data/biospecimen storage and sharing.  In developing this resource, we engaged with key federal partners, as well as scientific societies and associations.  Importantly, we also considered the 102 comments from stakeholders in response to a RFI that we issued in 2021.

As for our second resource, we are requesting public comment on protecting the privacy of research participants when data is shared. I think I need to be upfront and acknowledge that we have issued many of these types of requests over the last several months and NIH understands the effort that folks take to thoughtfully respond.  With that said, we think the research community will greatly benefit from this resource and we want to hear your thoughts on whether it hits the mark or needs adjustment….”

Using the State of Open Data survey to put the NIH Policy on Data Management and Sharing into practice

“Join us for a webinar on how the State of Open Data survey — the annual survey on researchers’ attitudes toward open data and data sharing — can help your institution put the NIH Policy on Data Management and Sharing into practice. …”

Draft policy on University of California research data open for second round of review – Office of Scholarly Communication

“The draft of the Presidential Policy on University of California Research Data is now open for a second round of systemwide review. The purposes of the policy are to 1) clarify ownership of and responsibility for research data generated during the course of University Research, 2) encourage active data management practices, and 3) provide guidance with respect to procedures when a researcher leaves the University. 

Ownership of research data by the UC Regents is a long-standing precept originally articulated in Regulation 4 (Academic Personnel Manual 020), where it states “Notebooks and other original records of the research are the property of the University.” Not since Regulation 4’s issuance in 1958, however, has any other systemwide UC policy provided further information on this stance. To provide more guidance to the UC community, the Research Policy and Analysis (RPAC) unit within Academic Affairs at the Office of the President began work in 2017 on a draft research data policy document, originally consulting with a small advisory group of representatives from UC San Diego, UCLA, UC Berkeley, the Office of General Counsel, and California Digital Library. …”

Data Policies and Principles

“Recognizing the crucial role of open and effective data and information exchange to the Belmont Challenge, the Belmont Forum adopted open Data Policy and Principles based on the recommendations from the Community Strategy and Implementation Plan (CSIP) at its 2015 annual meeting of Principals in Oslo, Norway. The policy signals a commitment by funders of global environmental change research to increase access to scientific data, a step widely recognized as essential to making informed decisions in the face of rapid changes affecting the Earth’s environment….

Data should be:

 

Discoverable through catalogues and search engines
Accessible as open data by default, and made available with minimum time delay
Understandable in a way that allows researchers—including those outside the discipline of origin—to use them
Manageable and protected from loss for future use in sustainable, trustworthy repositories…

Research data must be:

Discoverable through catalogues and search engines, with data access and use conditions, including licenses, clearly indicated. Data should have appropriate persistent, unique and resolvable identifiers.
Accessible by default, and made available with minimum time delay, except where international and national policies or legislation preclude the sharing of data as Open Data. Data sources should always be cited.
Understandable and interoperable in a way that allows researchers, including those outside the discipline of origin, to use them. Preference should be given to non-proprietary international and community standards via data e-infrastructures that facilitate access, use and interpretation of data. Data must also be reusable and thus require proper contextual information and metadata, including provenance, quality and uncertainty indicators. Provision should be made for multiple languages.
Manageable and protected from loss for future use in sustainable, trustworthy repositories with data management policies and plans for all data at the project and institutional levels. Metrics should be exploited to facilitate the ability to measure return on investment, and can be used to implement incentive schemes for researchers, as well as provide measures of data quality.
Supported by a highly skilled workforce and a broad-based training and education curriculum as an integral part of research programs. …”

Monitoring EOSC readiness: FAIR data policies | FAIRsFAIR

“The ambition of the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) is to provide a  ‘multi-disciplinary environment where researchers can publish, find and re-use data, tools and services, enabling them to better conduct their work’. The realisation of the EOSC vision depends upon the availability of FAIR data (i.e., those data that are findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable). The Strategic Research and Innovation Agenda (SRIA) defines the general framework for future research, development and innovation activities in relation to the EOSC and identified the availability of standardised national Open Science and FAIR data strategies, including the description of these policies, as a key priority to enable the continuous monitoring of the landscape with regards to EOSC readiness. 

This workshop will share recent work undertaken by the EOSC Association to monitor additional activities and define key performance indicators relating to FAIR data policies; share the key aims of a survey on policy monitoring currently being carried out with Member States; and introduce solutions being developed by EOSC Future and FAIRsFAIR to support comparable policy monitoring moving forward. The workshop will allow ample time for questions and discussion. This event will be useful for a broad range of stakeholders who are interested in – or may need to contribute to – the ongoing monitoring of the policy landscape at different levels. ”

Public Domain Day 2022: Welcoming Works from 1926 to the Public Domain | Authors Alliance

“Once in the public domain, works can be made freely available. Organizations that have digitized text of these books, like Internet Archive, Google Books, and HathiTrust, can now open up unrestricted access to the full text of these works. HathiTrust alone will open up full access to more than 35,000 titles originally published in 1926. This increased access provides richer historical context for scholarly research and opportunities for students to supplement and deepen their understanding of assigned texts. And authors who care about the long-term availability of their works may also have reason to look forward to their works eventually entering the public domain: A 2013 study found that in most cases, public domain works are actually more available to readers than all but the most recently published works. 

What’s more, public domain works can be adapted into new works of authorship, or “derivative works,” including by adapting printed books into audio books or by adapting classic books into interactive forms like video games. And the public domain provides opportunities to freely translate works to help fill the gap in works available to readers in their native language.”

Whitepaper: Proposal to leverage Article 17 to build a public repository of Public Domain and openly licensed works. · Open Future

“The German implementation includes a number of provisions that are specifically designed to reduce the risk of so-called overblocking: The unjustified blocking or removal of uploads subsequent to rightholder requests to prevent the availability of their works in accordance with Article 17(4) of the directive. These provisions include the requirement not to block “presumably legitimate” uploads and the requirement to keep disputed uploads available until the dispute is resolved.

In addition the German implementation law contains a specific provision aimed at preventing the unjustified blocking of works that are in the Public Domain or that have been licensed under open licenses….

To comply with this provision, OCSSPs operating in Germany will need to maintain an internal repository of works for which they have (1) received a blocking request and where (2) such blocking request has turned out to be abusive because the works are either in the Public Domain or where the use of the work is authorised under the terms of an open license…. 

Over time such repositories can be expected to grow and will likely start to contain a substantial number of entries relating to a wide variety of openly licensed and public domain works. This will result in the repositories obtaining value beyond the relatively narrow use case of preventing overblocking of openly licensed and PD works by OCSSPs: They will become repositories of freely reusable works that can help to unlock the societal value of these works…”

Ouvrir la Science – “Data policy” linked to publications: recommendations to journals

The Research Data College has set up a working group on the link between publications and research data. The aim is to contribute to the implementation of the Second Commitment of National Plan For Open Science.