SciELO Preprints server completes two years of operation, contributing to the advancement of Open Science | SciELO in Perspective

The positioning of the SciELO Program as an open science program, provided for the creation of a preprints’ server, announced in 2017. In September 2018, during the SciELO 20 Years Week, the partnership between SciELO and the Public Knowledge Project (PKP) was launched with the objective of developing an open source preprints server based on the already consolidated Open Journal Systems (OJS).

Join the ASAPbio Board of Directors – call for applications – ASAPbio

“ASAPbio is seeking several new members for our Board of Directors to support our mission to drive positive change in science communication and to broaden our geographic representation.

We are looking for new Board members who can help us deliver on our strategic goals and complement the perspectives of existing Board members. We particularly seek individuals with expertise in the areas below:

Driving and managing culture change
Meta-research, ideally with a strong understanding of the current landscape and trends around preprints and open peer review
Data and information analysis in the context of science communication

We want to increase the geographical representation within the Board, and we would particularly welcome applications from Asia, Europe, Latin America, and Oceania.”

IndiaRxiv Relaunched – IndiaRxiv

“During the Foundation Day celebrations of the Society for Promotion of Horticulture (SPH), IndiaRxiv (India Archive), preprints repository server for India was relaunched on the SPH’s webserver using Public Knowledge Project’s free & open source software, Open Preprints Systems. Previously, the Centre for Open Science was hosting the repository using Open Science Framework. Preprints are versions of articles that have not yet been submitted to a journal for peer review….”

PKP Publishing Services Welcomes OPS Hosted Client: Engineering Archive | Public Knowledge Project

“PKP Publishing Services (PKP|PS) is happy to welcome our first Open Preprint Systems (OPS) hosted client, Engineering Archive (engrXiv).

Open Engineering Inc launched engrXiv in 2016 with the mission of openly disseminating engineering knowledge and is now migrating from OSF Preprints, the Centre for Open Science’s preprint service, to OPS, an open-source system developed by PKP in partnership with SciELO, for managing and posting preprints online. The move will provide engrXiv with greater operational control and the support of a strong open source community. …”

Announcing engrXiv’s new host

“Engineering Archive is excited to announce that the server has moved from to a new hosting provider and server platform, Open Preprint Systems (OPS) hosted by PKP Publishing Services (PKP|PS).

Engineering Archive was launched in 2016 on the Open Science Framework (Center for Open Science). For the past five and a half years, we have seen strong growth of the server as an open access repository for engineering scholarship. We are grateful to the Center for Open Science for providing a home for the server in these first years of service.

Our new home with PKP|PS will provide Engineering Archive with greater financial security and improved user management and unites us with the vibrant open-source community developing OPS (built on the same framework as the popular Open Journal Systems software). We must also thank the staff at PKP for their assistance in preparing the server for migration to this new platform.”

IndiaRxiv will soon resume accepting preprints | IndiaRxiv – Preprints Repository of India

“On its web server, the Society for Promotion of Horticulture Bengaluru will host IndiaRxiv using Open Preprint Systems. The preprints server will re-launch later this month and is currently in the process of scouting volunteers (moderators) who will scrutinize the submissions and verify conformity for preprint acceptance. IndiaRxiv has recently been granted a provisional ISSN 2583-0007. It is the first preprint server to receive an ISSN.”

PLOS and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Extend Partnership to Accelerate Preprint Sharing in Medicine – The Official PLOS Blog

“The Public Library of Science (PLOS) and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) today announced an expansion of their longstanding partnership to offer authors more options for rapidly and easily sharing their research before publication in a journal. Beginning this month, three PLOS journals, PLOS Medicine, PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, and PLOS ONE, will offer authors the option to have their manuscript automatically forwarded to the preprint server medRxiv for posting as a preprint….”

One (more) small step for preprints, one giant leap for rapid and responsible sharing of medical research at PLOS – The Official PLOS Blog

“We’re delighted to announce that PLOS and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) are expanding our longstanding partnership to offer authors more options for sharing their research in preprint form. Beginning this month, three PLOS journals, PLOS Medicine, PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, and PLOS ONE, will offer authors the option to have their manuscript forwarded to the medicine-focused preprint server medRxiv for posting as a preprint. ”

Blog – Europe PMC: Transparency for preprints: handling withdrawals and removals

“Part of the appeal of preprints is the ability to post new versions, allowing researchers to continuously improve their manuscript and correct it if needed. However, in some cases the data or its interpretation presented in the preprint may be proven incorrect with time. In such cases the authors may wish to withdraw or remove the preprint, rather than posting another version. There could also be instances where preprints are removed for legal reasons, due to authorship disputes, or even as a result of erroneous posting. 

Currently, there are several different ways in which preprint platforms handle such scenarios. In the case of a withdrawal the preprint itself is often still accessible, but it is supplemented with a new version containing a withdrawal notice, which explains that the preprint should not be considered part of the scientific record. This is akin to retractions for peer reviewed journal articles. On the other hand, in the case of a removal all preprint versions are removed and the content is no longer accessible, in some cases with a removal notice replacing the preprint itself. You can see the list of different withdrawal/removal policies in the ASAPbio Preprint Server Directory.

For an archive, such as Europe PMC, it is crucial to follow best practices for handling preprint metadata to enable transparency and build trust in preprints. As a proof-of-concept we now provide a way to search and display withdrawn and removed preprints with appropriate labels for the COVID-19 full text preprint subset. We identify preprint withdrawal or removal notices based on document length (notices are often just a single sentence long) using the Europe PMC plus submission system. Those records are then flagged, manually checked and tagged with the appropriate withdrawal or removal article-type [Hamelers A, Parkin M. A full text collection of COVID-19 preprints in Europe PMC using JATS XML]….”

Will preprint servers disrupt scientific publishing, reference work and information science? | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether preprint servers are a disruptive technology for science, librarians or information seeking among the general population.

Design/methodology/approach

This column explores what preprint servers are, how they are used in the world of science, how their usage changed in response to the deluge of COVID-19 related research papers and how they might impact the work of librarians and society in general.

Findings

Preprint servers are not a highly disruptive technology, but they do challenge both scientists and librarians to understand them better, use the information they find on them with care and educate society in general on topics such as peer review and the importance of using well-vetted, good quality science in making important decisions.

Originality/value

Up until the past year and a half, only a small segment of the librarian profession needed to be concerned with preprint servers. With the increasing presence of references to non-peer-reviewed articles from preprint servers in popular media reports, most librarians now need to know something about this technology. It is also useful to consider how the technology might benefit and create challenges for their work.

Celebrating 30 Years of arXiv and Its Lasting Legacy on Scientific Advancement – SPARC

“Sharing preprints – the preliminary versions of scientific manuscripts before peer-review and publication in an academic journal—over the internet was a new concept in 1991 when Paul Ginsparg launched the preprint server arXiv. This was before the World Wide Web took off, and there was skepticism about the transition to digital content.

Ginsparg’s idea was to level the global research playing field by providing access to the latest research results. Thirty years later, the free distribution service and open-access archive now has nearly 2 million scholarly papers.

The success of arXiv not only proved there was a demand in high-energy physics, but it has finally prompted other fields from mathematics to biological sciences to sociology to follow suit. Now, preprints in a variety of disciplines are accelerating discovery and demonstrating, more than ever during the global pandemic, the urgent need for information sharing in real time.

The work of arXiv has been important to the development of Open Access (OA) . Indeed, the OA movement was almost called Open Archive, says Melissa Hagemann, senior program officer with the Open Society Foundations. She was inspired to organize a meeting 20 years ago that led to the Budapest Open Access Initiative, in part, because arXiv demonstrated what was possible in disseminating academic research outside of a subscription-based model….”

Expanding our global capacity for preprint sharing – COAR

“In the past, institutional and generalist repositories have not played a significant role in hosting these objects. However, as the sharing of preprints becomes more widely embraced, these types of repositories are obvious mechanisms to expand the preprint ecosystem internationally, without having to launch many new preprint services.

In August/September 2021, ASAPbio and COAR conducted a survey of institutional and generalist repositories to gauge their current activities and future plans related to the collection of preprints. We received 118 responses, with over 65% of respondents indicating that they already have preprints in their collection. In addition, of those respondents that do not currently collect preprints, over 65% indicated that they plan to do so in the future. According to the survey, practices are quite varied in terms of the services related to preprints provided by these repositories. Most support linking to the published journal version of the article, and about half of them assign DOIs (though it is common practice for most repositories to assign permanent URL, such as a handle). However, other services common in domain preprint archives, such as support for versioning, linking to external peer review services, and basic screening, are less common. A more detailed report of the survey findings will be available soon.

COAR and ASAPbio recognize that it is important these repositories are able to respond to the needs of the research community when collecting preprints. To that end, we will be launching a working group with the aim of understanding current challenges, developing some good practice recommendations, and creating a plan to advance the adoption of the functionalities that support the collection of preprints in institutional and generalist repositories.”

Elsevier’s Scopus expands to include SSRN preprints

“Elsevier, a global leader in research publishing and information analytics, today announces that preprints from SSRN, its world-leading early stage research and preprint platform, are now available through Scopus, Elsevier’s abstract and citation database. This follows preprints from arXiv, ChemRxiv, bioRxiv and medRxiv being indexed in Scopus earlier this year.

This development comes in reaction to feedback and requests from the researcher community, as demand for and use of preprints has jumped in recent years. At present, over 1 million Author Profiles in Scopus have 900,000 preprints indexed to them dating back to 2017. By the end of this year, approximately 170,000 SSRN preprints, from 2017 onwards will be included in Scopus….”

Research data communication strategy at the time of pandemics: a retrospective analysis of the Italian experience | Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease

Abstract:  Coronavirus pandemic has radically changed the scientific world. During these difficult times, standard peer-review processes could be too long for the continuously evolving knowledge about this disease. We wanted to assess whether the use of other types of network could be a faster way to disseminate the knowledge about Coronavirus disease. We retrospectively analyzed the data flow among three distinct groups of networks during the first three months of the pandemic: PubMed, preprint repositories (biorXiv and arXiv) and social media in Italy (Facebook and Twitter). The results show a significant difference in the number of original research articles published by PubMed and preprint repositories. On social media, we observed an incredible number of physicians participating to the discussion, both on three distinct Italian-speaking Facebook groups and on Twitter. The standard scientific process of publishing articles (i.e., the peer-review process) remains the best way to get access to high-quality research. Nonetheless, this process may be too long during an emergency like a pandemic. The thoughtful use of other types of network, such as preprint repositories and social media, could be taken into consideration in order to improve the clinical management of COVID-19 patients.

 

Following Preprints

“An important part of our mission at bioRxiv is to alert readers when new preprints that might interest them are posted. You can already sign up for personalized alerts on the bioRxiv Alerts/RSS page (see figure below) to get automatic notifications when papers that satisfy your search criteria are posted. We also provide dedicated RSS feeds and twitter accounts for certain subject categories (Cell Biology, Neuroscience, Genetics, etc.). 

But preprints can be revised, people comment on them, and ultimately most end up being published in journals. Since these are all events readers might also want to know about, we have now added an exciting new feature that allows you to Follow a preprint so that you get notified when someone comments on it, the authors post a new version, or the paper is published as a version of record in a journal.

 

To follow a paper, simply click on ‘Follow this preprint’ above the title, enter your email address, and choose which events you’d like to be notified about. We’ll then send you an email when the events occur – summary emails are sent once a day so you are not bombarded! …”