DataCite Repository Selector

“Repository Finder, a pilot project of the Enabling FAIR Data Project led by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in partnership with DataCite and the Earth, space and environment sciences community, can help you find an appropriate repository to deposit your research data. The tool is hosted by DataCite and queries the re3data registry of research data repositories….”

As part of the FAIRsFAIR project, which aims to supply practical solutions for the use of the FAIR data principles throughout the research data life cycle, the Repository Finder is extended to query for repositories relevant to FAIRsFAIR Project….”

re3data – Advancing Services for Open Science

Abstract:  re3data is the global registry for research data repositories [2]. With January 2019 the service lists over 2250 digital repositories and provides an extensive description based on a detailed metadata schema [3]. A variety of funders, publishers and scientific organizations around the world refer to re3data within their guidelines and policies, recommending the service to researchers looking for appropriate repositories for storage and search of research data. Starting with an introduction and overview to re3data and its current status under the auspices of DataCite, the talk will outline the recent and upcoming development in a heterogeneous and highly dynamic research data infrastructure landscape. The diverse requirements of the institutional stakeholders as well as the scientific communities impose demanding challenges on the architecture, networking with other services and technical implementation. The presentation will illustrate that with recent examples, like the integration and reuse of re3data in the American Geophysical Union’s (AGU) ‘Repository Finder’[1] , landscape analysis of data repositories for the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) and a planned cooperation with B2FIND, RADAR and GeRDI on the subject classification. Fostering Open Science and FAIR data, the talk will close with a prospect on the planned next steps towards an open and linked data service matching the demands of researchers and organization.

ISA 10 years: An Open Science journey from publications to data | Affair(e)s in Science

“Part of reimagining of the research ecosystem means the publication is not the only important output of research. What about the datasets unpinning the publications, the software and other outputs? What about getting credit for producing and sharing those outputs? A research data management policy was in its early stages of development at the CRG and my time with publications had come to an end. I said goodbye to ISA with a heavy heart and travelled deeper into the depths of the open infrastructure supporting data sharing.

I have now been working with DataCite for 2 years. I am the support manager, which means I spend time helping librarians with metadata problems and reporting bugs, as well as organizing meetings and writing documentation. I work with the community engagement team, the data community being the backbone of our organization.

DataCite is a DOI registration agency. I didn’t know much about DOIs when I started working for them, now maybe I know too much. A DOI (Digital Object Identifier) is a type of persistent identifier (PID). They are used to uniquely identify “stuff” for example: publications (Crossref DOIs), datasets (DataCite DOIs), researchers (ORCIDs) and research institutions (RoR). We sometimes joke, in a very nerdy way, about other types of things that could have identifiers. There is already a move to have them for conferences, samples and instruments. DOIs are always accompanied by metadata. Some basic examples of metadata would be the “title”, “publisher” and “date” of the content being shared.

We work primarily with repositories (some well known generalist repositories are Zenodo and Figshare) to assign DOIs to research outputs. Assigning a DOI and the accompanying metadata means that the research outputs in these repositories can be discovered, cited and tracked. It makes data FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable). There is no doubt that data sharing and citation are an essential part of moving towards a better research ecosystem. But getting this to happen takes time and effort. It involves changing practices – like actually citing the underlying data in research articles – and much more work lies ahead. DataCite works primarily with nonprofit organizations, but partnerships with for-profits open up new possibilities. There is no good and evil in this church. We must strive for openness, trust and transparency, there is no time to waste….”

CHORUS and DataCite sign MOU to advance linking and discoverability – CHORUS

“CHORUS and DataCite have signed a two-year Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to coordinate efforts to adopt identifiers and standards to manage access to and reporting of research outputs.

Authoritative connections between researchers and their works, funding sources, and affiliations, are essential for delivering public access to scholarly content. As not-for-profit organizations engaged in supporting discoverability in scholarly communications, both DataCite and CHORUS have an important contribution to make creating and supporting these links.

The organizations commit to dialog and cooperation on the following topics:

Supporting simple and non-ambiguous links between datasets, researchers and their funding
Displaying links between CHORUS content and DataCite DOIs in the CHORUS dashboards and reports
Building awareness of DataCite services among funding agency researchers and administrators
Encouraging the use of persistent identifiers for researchers and organizations to support public access to research works …”

DataCite Commons – Discovering PIDs and the PID Graph

“DataCite recently launched DataCite Commons, a new discovery service which allows you to conduct simple searches across different types of PIDs giving a comprehensive overview of the connections between entities. DataCite Commons has been released as a minimum viable product and will be developed in the future. This webinar will present the new service and provide the background to it, including the user driven requirements gathering and give an opportunity for feedback on how much it meets your needs and what else you would like it to do….”

DataCite Commons – Exploiting the Power of PIDs and the PID Graph

“Today DataCite is proud to announce the launch of DataCite Commons, available at https://commons.datacite.org. DataCite Commons is a discovery service that enables simple searches while giving users a comprehensive overview of connections between entities in the research landscape. This means that DataCite members registering DOIs with us will have easier access to information about the use of their DOIs and can discover and track connections between their DOIs and other entities. DataCite Commons was developed as part of the EC-funded project Freya and will form the basis of new DataCite services….

We integrate with both the ORCID and ROR (Research Organization Registry) APIs to enable a search for (10 million) people and (100,000) organizations and to show the associated content. For funding, we take advantage of the inclusion of Crossref Funder IDs in ROR metadata. We combine these connections, showing a funder, research organization, or researcher not only their content but also the citations and views and downloads if available, together with aggregate statistics such as numbers by year or content type….”

The DataCite MDC Stack

“In May, the Make Data Count team announced that we have received additional funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for work on the Make Data Count (MDC) initiative. This will enable DataCite to do additional work in two important areas:

Implement a bibliometrics dashboard that enables bibliometricians – funded by a separate Sloan grant – to do quantitative studies around data usage and citation behaviors.

Increase adoption of standardized data usage across repositories by developing a log processing service that offloads much of the hard work from repositories.

In this blog post, we want to provide more technical details about the upcoming work on the bibliometrics dashboard; the log processing service will be the topic of a future blog post. The bibliometrics dashboard will be based on several important infrastructure pieces that DataCite has built over the past few years, and that are again briefly described below….”

Introducing the PID Services Registry

“We are pleased to announce the launch of the new persistent identifier (PID) services registry available at https://pidservices.org, a new service to find services built upon different PIDs from core technology providers and those who integrate from across a variety of disciplinary areas. This is a combined effort across multiple organizations as part of the EC-funded FREYA project grant (777523) with the aim of furthering discoverability of PIDs and the services that are built upon them….”

DataCite Repository Selector

“Repository Finder, a pilot project of the Enabling FAIR Data Project led by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in partnership with DataCite and the earth and space sciences community, can help you find an appropriate repository to deposit your research data. The tool is hosted by DataCite and queries the re3data registry of research data repositories….”