DataCite Make Data Count Webinar Series | DataCite Blog

by Paul Vierkant

Make Data Count (MDC) is a scholarly change initiative, made up of researchers and open infrastructure experts, building and advocating for evidence-based open data metrics. Throughout MDC’s tenure, various areas key to the development of research data assessment metrics have been identified. Please join a Spring seminar and discussion series centered around priority work areas, adjacent initiatives to learn from, and steps that can be taken immediately to drive diverse research communities towards assessment and reward for open data.

The first webinar titled “FORAGE: the hunt for existing data citations” will focus on the issue of finding and aggregating citations, how we can extend open citation initiatives to data, and how we can get known citations into a centralized open place. The webinar will take place on Mar 17, 2022, 4pm-5pm (UTC) including Julia Lane, Silvio Peroni, Carly Robinson, and Stephanie van de Sandt as speakers. Please register here for the one hour event.

“EXPLORE: the need for an open classification system” is the title of the second webinar that will take place on April 7, 3pm-4pm (UTC), 2022 (speakers and agenda to be announced).

The final webinar “BEGIN: metadata for meaningful data metrics“ will be on May 19, 3pm-4pm (UTC), 2022 (speakers and agenda to be announced).

Be part of and spread the word about this webinar series that discusses and demystifies the key issues and opportunities in building for open data metrics.

DataCite webinar – FORAGE: the hunt for existing data citations, Mar 17, 2022, 5 pm (CET)

Make Data Count (MDC) is a scholarly change initiative, made up of researchers and open infrastructure experts, building and advocating for evidence-based open data metrics. Throughout MDC’s tenure, various areas key to the development of research data assessment metrics have been identified. Please join a Spring seminar and discussion series centered around priority work areas, adjacent initiatives to learn from, and steps that can be taken immediately to drive diverse research communities towards assessment and reward for open data.

The first webinar titled “FORAGE: the hunt for existing data citations” will focus on the issue of finding and aggregating citations, how we can extend open citation initiatives to data, and how we can get known citations into a centralized open place.

Speakers include:
Julia Lane (Coleridge Initiative)
Silvio Peroni (Open Citations)
Carly Robinson (US Department of Energy, OSTI)
Stephanie van de Sandt (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)

Job: Technical Community Manager | DataCite

Your responsibilities

Build strategies to drive adoption and technical implementation

Continuously evaluate workflows and demonstrate value for community stakeholders through embedding DataCite services in their workflows
Communicate the stakeholder value proposition across the various DataCite services
Lead the DataCite Service Providers program
Monitor the use of DataCite services to track key adoption metrics
Provide input into the product design specifications as needed
Develop relevant materials and demonstrate best practices in order to improve adoption

Lead the DataCite Adoption team

Manage a small team responsible for Adoption, Technical Workflows, and Support
Develop the DataCite adoption strategy and align with the DataCite strategic plan
Be the internal point of contact for the DataCite Engineering team to ensure alignment

Organize community efforts towards adoption of data metrics

Advocate for adoption of responsible, meaningful approaches to research data assessment
Coordinate with community stakeholders to define the adoption strategies of data usage and data citation best practices
Convene community stakeholders to build on the established Community of Practice

Ensure project outcomes are adopted as part of DataCite’s core services

Develop adoption strategies for the various project activities and outputs
Work with Early Adopters to provide exemplar implementations and best practices
Actively participate in community groups and meetings to ensure alignment across community initiatives

Coordinate further development and adoption of the DataCite metadata schema

Be the DataCite representative on the Metadata Working Group
Collate member, service provider, and other community stakeholder feedback for the Metadata Working Group and share adoption and implementation use cases
Work with members, service providers and other community stakeholders on implementation of metadata best practices

Required skills and qualifications

University degree
Familiar with research infrastructure and the open science landscape
Sufficient technical skills to advise members on integrations, including experience with making and troubleshooting requests to RESTful APIs and familiarity with XML and JSON data structures
Experience with Git/Github and basic knowledge of one or more scripting languages such as Python, Javascript, Ruby or PHP
Familiarity/comfort with command line tools, such as cURL
Knowledge of data metrics and the various community efforts
Passionate about metadata
Ability to work with a distributed team across time zones
Strong, compelling, and clear written, oral, and visual communication
Self-motivated to succeed and take initiative and seek continuous improvement

Desired skills

Outreach experience, particularly engaging with global and technical audiences
Data science skills
Familiarity with product management
Familiarity with one or more digital repository platforms (DSpace, Dataverse, ePrints, Invenio, Samvera, etc)
Experience with tools such as Salesforce and WordPress is a plus
Experience working in an international environment
Comfortable working remotely

Why work for us

Remote position.
Competitive local salary.
30 days vacation time annually, plus 1 day paid extra for volunteer work of your choice.
Flexible working hours.
Option to work in a co-working space with a paid contribution from us.
Opportunity to learn something new every day.

?Implementing FAIR Workflows: A Proof of Concept Study in the Field of Consciousness? | Templeton World Charity Foundation, Inc.

“Although formally published research papers remain the most important means of communicating science today, they do not provide a sufficient amount of information to fully evaluate scientific work. There is typically no mechanism to easily link to experimental design the research data or analytical tools that were used, preventing researchers from being able to fully understand the results of the research, replicate the results, or decisively evaluate and reuse existing research.

Led by project director Helena Cousijn, DataCite and its partners aim to address this problem by developing an exemplar workflow and ecosystem that will assist teams in adhering to FAIR principles for making all research outputs available. By providing a workflow that is easy to implement, the team ultimately aims to start a culture change, where it becomes a standard part of the research culture to make outputs FAIR upon inception.   

The workflow will be developed in collaboration with, and applied to, a research study in the field of consciousness. This field is a fitting proving ground for such a project, as a lack of infrastructure for meaningfully aggregating data in consciousness research has contributed to a lack of agreement about what anatomical structures and physiological processes in the human brain give rise to consciousness despite almost three decades of focused research. Developing FAIR workflows will address that need, unleashing the possibility to better understand the neural foundations of consciousness.

Through this project, DataCite and its partners will develop a proof-of-concept product in the field of consciousness that will accelerate open science. The team’s end goal is to provide researchers in all disciplines with a method for engaging in FAIR research practices that is easy to implement and follow.”

DataCite’s Commitment to The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure

“DataCite was founded in 2009 on the principle of being an open stakeholder governed community that is open to participation from organizations around the world. Today, that continues to be true. Although our services have expanded, we continue to remain grounded to our roots. DataCite’s umbrella was formed with the aim to safeguard common standards worldwide to support research, thereby facilitating compliance with the rules of good scientific practice. DataCite’s identifier registration, Data File, and services are foundational components of the scholarly ecosystem. As the ecosystem continues to evolve, governance, sustainability and living-will insurance have become increasingly important components of the open infrastructure.

Recently several open scholarly infrastructure organizations and initiatives have adopted The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure. DataCite has conducted its own audit against the principles and would like to affirm our commitment to upholding these….”

Open Research Infrastructure Programs at LYRASIS

“Academic libraries, and institutional repositories in particular, play a key role in the ongoing quest for ways to gather metrics and connect the dots between researchers and research contributions in order to measure “institutional impact,” while also streamlining workflows to reduce administrative burden. Identifying accurate metrics and measurements for illustrating “impact” is a goal that many academic research institutions share, but these goals can only be met to the extent that all organizations across the research and scholarly communication landscape are using best practices and shared standards in research infrastructure. For example, persistent identifiers (PIDs) such as ORCID iDs (Open Researcher and Contributor Identifier) and DOIs (Digital Object Identifiers) have emerged as crucial best practices for establishing connections between researchers and their contributions while also serving as a mechanism for interoperability in sharing data across systems. The more institutions using persistent identifiers (PIDs) in their workflows, the more connections can be made between entities, making research objects more FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable). Also, when measuring institutional repository usage, clean, comparable, standards-based statistics are needed for accurate internal assessment, as well as for benchmarking with peer institutions….”

Open Research Infrastructure Programs at LYRASIS

“Academic libraries, and institutional repositories in particular, play a key role in the ongoing quest for ways to gather metrics and connect the dots between researchers and research contributions in order to measure “institutional impact,” while also streamlining workflows to reduce administrative burden. Identifying accurate metrics and measurements for illustrating “impact” is a goal that many academic research institutions share, but these goals can only be met to the extent that all organizations across the research and scholarly communication landscape are using best practices and shared standards in research infrastructure. For example, persistent identifiers (PIDs) such as ORCID iDs (Open Researcher and Contributor Identifier) and DOIs (Digital Object Identifiers) have emerged as crucial best practices for establishing connections between researchers and their contributions while also serving as a mechanism for interoperability in sharing data across systems. The more institutions using persistent identifiers (PIDs) in their workflows, the more connections can be made between entities, making research objects more FAIR (findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable). Also, when measuring institutional repository usage, clean, comparable, standards-based statistics are needed for accurate internal assessment, as well as for benchmarking with peer institutions….”

DataCite Repository Selector

“Repository Finder, a pilot project of the Enabling FAIR Data Project led by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) in partnership with DataCite and the Earth, space and environment sciences community, can help you find an appropriate repository to deposit your research data. The tool is hosted by DataCite and queries the re3data registry of research data repositories….”

As part of the FAIRsFAIR project, which aims to supply practical solutions for the use of the FAIR data principles throughout the research data life cycle, the Repository Finder is extended to query for repositories relevant to FAIRsFAIR Project….”

re3data – Advancing Services for Open Science

Abstract:  re3data is the global registry for research data repositories [2]. With January 2019 the service lists over 2250 digital repositories and provides an extensive description based on a detailed metadata schema [3]. A variety of funders, publishers and scientific organizations around the world refer to re3data within their guidelines and policies, recommending the service to researchers looking for appropriate repositories for storage and search of research data. Starting with an introduction and overview to re3data and its current status under the auspices of DataCite, the talk will outline the recent and upcoming development in a heterogeneous and highly dynamic research data infrastructure landscape. The diverse requirements of the institutional stakeholders as well as the scientific communities impose demanding challenges on the architecture, networking with other services and technical implementation. The presentation will illustrate that with recent examples, like the integration and reuse of re3data in the American Geophysical Union’s (AGU) ‘Repository Finder’[1] , landscape analysis of data repositories for the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) and a planned cooperation with B2FIND, RADAR and GeRDI on the subject classification. Fostering Open Science and FAIR data, the talk will close with a prospect on the planned next steps towards an open and linked data service matching the demands of researchers and organization.

ISA 10 years: An Open Science journey from publications to data | Affair(e)s in Science

“Part of reimagining of the research ecosystem means the publication is not the only important output of research. What about the datasets unpinning the publications, the software and other outputs? What about getting credit for producing and sharing those outputs? A research data management policy was in its early stages of development at the CRG and my time with publications had come to an end. I said goodbye to ISA with a heavy heart and travelled deeper into the depths of the open infrastructure supporting data sharing.

I have now been working with DataCite for 2 years. I am the support manager, which means I spend time helping librarians with metadata problems and reporting bugs, as well as organizing meetings and writing documentation. I work with the community engagement team, the data community being the backbone of our organization.

DataCite is a DOI registration agency. I didn’t know much about DOIs when I started working for them, now maybe I know too much. A DOI (Digital Object Identifier) is a type of persistent identifier (PID). They are used to uniquely identify “stuff” for example: publications (Crossref DOIs), datasets (DataCite DOIs), researchers (ORCIDs) and research institutions (RoR). We sometimes joke, in a very nerdy way, about other types of things that could have identifiers. There is already a move to have them for conferences, samples and instruments. DOIs are always accompanied by metadata. Some basic examples of metadata would be the “title”, “publisher” and “date” of the content being shared.

We work primarily with repositories (some well known generalist repositories are Zenodo and Figshare) to assign DOIs to research outputs. Assigning a DOI and the accompanying metadata means that the research outputs in these repositories can be discovered, cited and tracked. It makes data FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable). There is no doubt that data sharing and citation are an essential part of moving towards a better research ecosystem. But getting this to happen takes time and effort. It involves changing practices – like actually citing the underlying data in research articles – and much more work lies ahead. DataCite works primarily with nonprofit organizations, but partnerships with for-profits open up new possibilities. There is no good and evil in this church. We must strive for openness, trust and transparency, there is no time to waste….”

CHORUS and DataCite sign MOU to advance linking and discoverability – CHORUS

“CHORUS and DataCite have signed a two-year Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to coordinate efforts to adopt identifiers and standards to manage access to and reporting of research outputs.

Authoritative connections between researchers and their works, funding sources, and affiliations, are essential for delivering public access to scholarly content. As not-for-profit organizations engaged in supporting discoverability in scholarly communications, both DataCite and CHORUS have an important contribution to make creating and supporting these links.

The organizations commit to dialog and cooperation on the following topics:

Supporting simple and non-ambiguous links between datasets, researchers and their funding
Displaying links between CHORUS content and DataCite DOIs in the CHORUS dashboards and reports
Building awareness of DataCite services among funding agency researchers and administrators
Encouraging the use of persistent identifiers for researchers and organizations to support public access to research works …”