Scholastica at 10: Betting on democratization over consolidation in scholarly publishing

“It’s 2022, and Scholastica is turning 10 years old this year! …

We started with our flagship peer review product and, in those early days, began working with smaller social science, humanities, and law journals. We knew we wanted to support the growing Open Access movement, so we introduced Open Access journal hosting software in 2015. More recently, we added our machine-learning-augmented article production service to make it possible for journals of any size to publish content in machine-readable HTML and XML in addition to PDF. All together, the three products now amount to an end-to-end solution for journals, from peer review to article production to publication/hosting.

Since 2012, we’ve grown on many fronts:

1,100 journals now use Scholastica’s peer review software, together receiving hundreds of thousands of submissions each year
200 Open Access journals have published 25,000 articles on Scholastica’s OA hosting platform
50 journals use Scholastica’s article production service to generate XML, PDF, and HTML versions of their articles
Our team has grown from the three co-founders to 16 full time and 4 part time employees, all based in the US. It’s amazing to look at those early hires and see them still with the company: George, Danielle, Anna, Raquel, Tatum. More members of our team are now approaching their 5-year anniversaries, and it’s heartwarming to see their professional growth over time….”

Scholastica announces integration with Altmetric Badges for its OA Publishing Platform

“Scholastica, a leading software solutions provider for academic journals, announced today that its open access publishing platform now includes an Altmetric Badge integration option to help journals, their authors, and readers track alternative impact indicators for articles.

Journals subscribed to Scholastica’s open access publishing platform with a paid Altmetric account can enable the new integration to have Altmetric Badges automatically displayed on the public metrics page for all the articles they publish via Scholastica. Each Altmetric Badge links to an Altmetric details page that features a breakdown of online attention received by the article….”

Scholastica announces integration with the latest version of Crossref Similarity Check (iThenticate V2)

“Scholastica, a leading software solutions provider for academic journals, announced today that their Peer Review System now includes the option to integrate with the latest version of Crossref’s Similarity Check plagiarism detection service (powered by iThenticate V2)….”

Reflections on a decade using Scholastica at GEP: Interview with Susan Altman

“Since 2000, MIT Press’ Global Environmental Politics journal has been publishing novel research examining the relationships between worldwide political forces and environmental change. In the early days of the journal, GEP’s founding editorial team managed its peer review process via a combination of email and spreadsheets. However, as the publication grew, they realized they needed dedicated software for submission tracking and manuscript management.

In 2013, the journal’s Managing Editor, Susan Altman, began working with Scholastica’s peer review system, which was selected by MIT Press because it offered a centralized place for tracking submissions and communicating with editors, authors, and reviewers. In the interview below, Altman reflects on GEP’s experience moving to Scholastica for peer review management, the editorial team’s experience working with Scholastica over the past decade, and the journal’s evolution up to this point….”

Reflections on a decade using Scholastica at GEP: Interview with Susan Altman

“Since 2000, MIT Press’ Global Environmental Politics journal has been publishing novel research examining the relationships between worldwide political forces and environmental change. In the early days of the journal, GEP’s founding editorial team managed its peer review process via a combination of email and spreadsheets. However, as the publication grew, they realized they needed dedicated software for submission tracking and manuscript management.

In 2013, the journal’s Managing Editor, Susan Altman, began working with Scholastica’s peer review system, which was selected by MIT Press because it offered a centralized place for tracking submissions and communicating with editors, authors, and reviewers. In the interview below, Altman reflects on GEP’s experience moving to Scholastica for peer review management, the editorial team’s experience working with Scholastica over the past decade, and the journal’s evolution up to this point….”

How We Open Knowledge: Scholastica users share their stories

“In the progression of the Open Access (OA) movement, it’s become resoundingly apparent that true accessibility isn’t just about making research free to read but also making publishing practices more equitable. If we are to realize the Budapest Open Access Initiative’s vision to “lay the foundation for uniting humanity in a common intellectual conversation and quest for knowledge,” all stakeholders must have an opportunity to contribute to OA models, not just those historically in positions of power.

The theme for this year’s OA Week (October 25-31), “It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity,” invites the academic community to weigh the current state of OA and what’s needed to promote greater Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) throughout the research ecosystem. At Scholastica, we were particularly drawn to the phrase “how we open knowledge” as a means to elicit discourse and, more importantly, action around the various ways scholarly organizations of all sizes are and can develop more equitable OA journal models. We’re proud to work with so many scholarly societies, academic institutions, and scholar-led non-profits publishing path-breaking OA journals committed to not only opening access to research but also lowering the cost of knowledge production. In honor of OA Week, we decided to reach out to some of those journal teams to ask them to share their take on the prompt “how we open knowledge.”

Throughout OA Week, we’ll be posting a series of interviews with Scholastica users on how they’re factoring structural equity into OA publication planning and advice for scholarly organizations looking to launch fully-OA journals….”

Streamlined peer review and PubMed-ready XML: How Spartan Medical Research Journal is using Scholastica to grow

“When SMRJ was started, the editors used email and Word docs to track peer review, and they published all articles in PDF format. However, with the journal continuing to expand, the editors realized they were in need of an easier way to track submissions and a new publishing system to improve the journal’s online reading experience and chances of being added to relevant indexes. As a result, Chief Editor William Corser and Assistant Editor Sam Wisniewski began searching for publishing tools and services, focused on three key areas: streamlining peer review, modernizing the journal’s website, and producing XML for all articles.

After considering different options, Corser and Wisniewski chose to use Scholastica’s peer review and open access publishing software, as well as Scholastica’s typesetting service to produce PDF, HTML, and XML article files. Since making the switch, they’ve found that peer review is smoother for editors and authors and they’re making strides towards reaching their article discovery and indexing goals….”

How to ensure your journals are prepared for Plan S: A guide for publishers using Scholastica

“As Plan S officially gets underway, are you wondering what steps you may still need to take to prepare? Journal publishers that wish to comply with the initiative to make all research funded by cOAlition S members on or after the 1st of January 2021 fully and immediately open access have three routes to choose from: …”

Survey Extended: The State of Journal Production and Access

“f you haven’t had a chance to take “The State of Journal Production and Access” survey, there’s still time — we’ve extended the deadline to the 5th of June 2020. You can take the survey here. Read on for the full details.

Since the 12th of March 2020, Scholastica has been running a survey on “The State of Journal Production and Access” among scholarly societies, university presses, and university libraries that publish one or more journals independently (i.e., not outsourced to a separate publisher). The survey spans core aspects of journal production, including article formatting, layout, and metadata tagging processes and priorities, as well as different open access publishing and funding models. Scholastica is running this survey to develop an openly available report for the independent society and university journal publishing community on current production and access practices and future priorities.

If you work with a scholarly society or university publishing program, we invite you to take the survey, open now through the 5th of June, to help develop collective insights. The survey takes only around 5-10 minutes to complete. The information you submit for this survey will be published in an aggregated and anonymized form, and no personally identifying fields are required….”

Survey Extended: The State of Journal Production and Access

“f you haven’t had a chance to take “The State of Journal Production and Access” survey, there’s still time — we’ve extended the deadline to the 5th of June 2020. You can take the survey here. Read on for the full details.

Since the 12th of March 2020, Scholastica has been running a survey on “The State of Journal Production and Access” among scholarly societies, university presses, and university libraries that publish one or more journals independently (i.e., not outsourced to a separate publisher). The survey spans core aspects of journal production, including article formatting, layout, and metadata tagging processes and priorities, as well as different open access publishing and funding models. Scholastica is running this survey to develop an openly available report for the independent society and university journal publishing community on current production and access practices and future priorities.

If you work with a scholarly society or university publishing program, we invite you to take the survey, open now through the 5th of June, to help develop collective insights. The survey takes only around 5-10 minutes to complete. The information you submit for this survey will be published in an aggregated and anonymized form, and no personally identifying fields are required….”

Academic-Led Journal Highlight: Interview with Naseem Naqvi

“When The British Blockchain Association decided to launch JBBA and began looking for the best means to publish the journal, Naqvi said he and his team were more concerned with soliciting quality articles and reaching the widest audience possible than with working with a known publisher. “Reputable publishers may impress some people but the majority of people are more interested in the quality of contents within the journal than who the publisher is,” explained Naqvi….”

A 21st Century Solution to the Serials Crisis: White paper

“As the cost of academic journals continues to rise, institutions and individual scholars are increasingly at risk of losing access to leading research. Time is running out to break this dangerous cycle. This white paper brings together key literature and insights from 5 expert open access (OA) advocates to survey the journal publishing landscape and explore ways research can affordably be made OA. The paper argues the keys to an OA future are: decentralization of the journal market, online-only publishing, and democratization of article production via services.

The paper overviews:

The past and present state of journal publishing
Current alternatives to the corporate publisher model
Steps to realize sustainable, open access-friendly journal models…”

White Paper Calls for 21st Century Solution to Serials Crisis

“It’s time for a 21st-century solution to the serials crisis that gives scholars the freedom to choose where to publish their research and how much it should cost. Scholastica’s white paper, “Democratizing Academic Journals: Technology, Services, and Open Access“ argues democratization of journal publishing is the key to lowering journal costs and facilitating open access (OA). Members of the academic community, either in not-for-profit organizations or informal groups, must break up the corporate publisher conglomerate by using technology and services to affordably publish journals on their own….”