Community consensus on core open science practices to monitor in biomedicine | PLOS Biology

Abstract:  The state of open science needs to be monitored to track changes over time and identify areas to create interventions to drive improvements. In order to monitor open science practices, they first need to be well defined and operationalized. To reach consensus on what open science practices to monitor at biomedical research institutions, we conducted a modified 3-round Delphi study. Participants were research administrators, researchers, specialists in dedicated open science roles, and librarians. In rounds 1 and 2, participants completed an online survey evaluating a set of potential open science practices, and for round 3, we hosted two half-day virtual meetings to discuss and vote on items that had not reached consensus. Ultimately, participants reached consensus on 19 open science practices. This core set of open science practices will form the foundation for institutional dashboards and may also be of value for the development of policy, education, and interventions.

 

2022 PLOS accomplishments – The Official PLOS Blog

“Here are some highlights:

Our new journals, launched to address global issues like climate change, published more than 1,000 papers
We just published our first dataset on our Open Science Indicators, a new initiative that will help us surface and understand researcher practices with regards to sharing data and code, among other Open Science practices 
We set up PLOS entities across the globe and formed relationships with stakeholders within local research ecosystems
We doubled the number of our institutional partnerships…”

Monitoring of open science and research

The objective of the monitoring of open science and research is to support the development of open science and research in organisations, support and verify the achievement of the objectives agreed in the Declaration and policies for open science and research, and form an overall view of the state of openness in Finnish science and research. The monitoring will use as much available, comparable data collected in the National Research Information Hub as possible. The monitoring also involves collecting data using a survey. The role of the survey as a source of monitoring data will decrease as more data accumulate in the National Research Information Hub. Initially, the survey plays a key role. The first year of monitoring is 2022. The results of the monitoring are published in research.fi and the survey results are stored for public open access. Monitoring will be carried out during the monitoring years as follows:

Opinion paper on monitoring open science – Publications Office of the EU

“The Competitiveness Council of November 2021 placed the development of Open Science and the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) as part of the European Research Area (ERA) Policy Agenda for 2022–2024. For the ERA priority on deepening a truly functioning internal market for knowledge the first policy action is to ‘enable the open sharing of knowledge and reuse of research outputs, including through the development of the EOSC’.”

Recalibrating the Scope of Scholarly Publishing: A Modest Step in a Vast Decolonization Process | Quantitative Science Studies | MIT Press

Abstract:  By analyzing 25,671 journals largely absent from common journal counts, as well as Web of Science and Scopus, this study demonstrates that scholarly communication is more of a global endeavor than is commonly credited. These journals, employing the open source publishing platform Open Journal Systems (OJS), have published 5.8 million items; they are in 136 countries, with 79.9% in the Global South and 84.2% following the OA diamond model (charging neither reader nor author). A substantial proportion of journals operate in more than one language (48.3%), with research published in a total of 60 languages (led by English, Indonesian, Spanish, and Portuguese). The journals are distributed across the social sciences (45.9%), STEM (40.3%), and the humanities (13.8%). For all their geographic, linguistic, and disciplinary diversity, 1.2% are indexed in the Web of Science and 5.7% in Scopus. On the other hand, 1.0% are found in Cabells Predatory Reports, while 1.4% show up in Beall’s questionable list. This paper seeks to both contribute and historically situate expanded scale and diversity of scholarly publishing in the hope that this recognition may assist humankind in taking full advantage of what is increasingly a global research enterprise.

 

Open access policy update: December 2022 | STM Publishing News

“UKRI has published updated information to support funded research organisations and researchers to meet its new open access policy.

Peer reviewed research articles that acknowledge UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) funding have been required to comply with UKRI’s open access policy since 1 April 2022.

From 1 January 2024, monographs, book chapters and edited collections that acknowledge UKRI funding will also need to be published open access….”

Open-Access-Reporting – Kriterien und Erhebungspraxis. Diskussionspapier der AG Wissenschaftliches Publikationssystem in der Schwerpunktinitiative „Digitale Information“ der Allianz der deutschen Wissenschaftsorganisationen | GFZpublic

Deinzer, G., Geschuhn, K., Mittermaier, B., Pampel, H., Retzlaff, E., Seeh, S., Siegert, O., Kreß, U. (2022): Open-Access-Reporting – Kriterien und Erhebungspraxis. Diskussionspapier der AG Wissenschaftliches Publikationssystem in der Schwerpunktinitiative „Digitale Information“ der Allianz der deutschen Wissenschaftsorganisationen. https://doi.org/10.48440/allianzoa.047

Five principles for monitoring and evaluation: The case of UKRI’s Open Access policy | Research Consulting

by Andrea Chiarelli

Between August and November 2022, almost 80 individuals from across the research and publishing landscape contributed to a study we delivered on behalf of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), to support the development of a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework for their Open Access (OA) policy.

The framework will help UKRI and the sector assess open access progress, levels of compliance with the policy and its effectiveness. It will also seek to establish insights into open access publication trends across the UK and, where possible, their impact on academic practices and society.

We are in the process of finalising project outputs for public dissemination alongside our associates Bianca Kramer and Cameron Neylon, but we are now in a position to share some high-level findings and next steps. This blog covers five key principles we identified from our discussions with the research and publishing communities, as well as considering the implications for UKRI’s future M&E efforts.

 

Open access Policy Update: December 2022 – UKRI

UKRI has published updated information to support funded research organisations and researchers to meet its new open access policy.

Peer reviewed research articles that acknowledge UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) funding have been required to comply with UKRI’s open access policy since 1 April 2022.

From 1 January 2024, monographs, book chapters and edited collections that acknowledge UKRI funding will also need to be published open access.

GOA8: Decisions and preliminary schedule « Walt at Random

“Here’s where things stand with regard to Gold Open Access 2017-2022:

Decisions

I will be using fees from DOAJ where that seems appropriate, based on fee code for last year and other factors. (Usually decided publisher-by-publisher; some big publishers provide spreadsheets with fees, which I’ll use.)
I will be using counts from DOAJ where that seems appropriate, based on availability of counts and consistency with previous data.
There will be a new CC column for count codes, e.g. d (DOAJ), f (pattern find), w (provided on website), e (estimate–rarely if ever used)
Unless things go more smoothly than expected (see below), malware sites will only be checked twice (and sites that had malware in GOA7 will only be checked once)
Final decision on Country book won’t be made until later, but given the underwhelming usage and interest, it may not happen….”

the-new-openaire-monitor-brand-new-dashboards-and-features

“The assessment of research activities is a key step in the decision-making process for every organisation investing in such activities; whether it is a funder evaluating the proper allocation of grants to maximise societal impact, an institution looking to find hidden potential and room-for-improvement areas, or a research initiative considering expanding its network, to name a few examples. The reliable and timely monitoring and evaluation of research activities are indispensable for the efficient allocation of resources and the overall decision-making process. 

The OpenAIRE MONITOR is an on-demand service built upon the OpenAIRE Research Graph with the mission to fulfill these needs. It offers tailor-made data and visualisation monitoring dashboards for funders, institutions and research initiatives, populated with well-documented metrics and indicators of research activities. To meet the requirements of each individual organisation, a default dashboard is improved upon in one-on-one co-designing sessions, that include the validation of data shown and the creation of new indicators, if needed.

After the launch of the Institutional Dashboard of OpenAIRE MONITOR, in May 2022, and working closely with the community, we focused our efforts on upgrading the service in three areas: (i) updating the user interface, (ii) improving the documentation of methodology and indicators (the new Resources tab), and (iii) redesigning all MONITOR dashboards with new indicators and visualisations. …”

Home | French RRS Monitor

“The Rights Retention Strategy (RRS) is an initiative from a consortium of research funders, the Coaliation S, which promote immediate open access without requiring payment to publish (no Article Processing Charge). The RRS is a way to publish in open access without paying.

This website describe publications in the french repository HAL, where the Right Retention Strategy has been applied….”