How the Open Book Collective works | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

by Livy Onalee Snyder and Joe Deville

The Open Book Collective (OBC) is a non-profit membership organization that brings together Open Access (OA) publishers, service providers, librarians, and other supporters to collectively bring about a fairer, more sustainable model of open book publishing. 

Through the OBC’s online platform, publishers and service providers offer individual and collective membership packages which libraries and other potential supporters can pay to join.

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Designing an Open Peer Review Process for Open Access Guides | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

by Simon Worthington

The LIBER Citizen Science Working Group is embarking on the design of an open peer review process for the guidebook series being published on the topic of citizen science for research libraries. The LIBER working group in collaboration with COPIM is looking for input and feedback on the design of the open peer review workflow. COPIM is supporting the working group by contributing its experience and knowledge of open access book publishing, with respect to collaborative post-publication input, community peer review processes, and reuse. The first section of the guide Citizen Science Skilling for Library Staff, Researchers, and the Public has already been published with three more sections to follow.

 

Say Hello to The Open Book Collective! | LJ infoDOCKET

From COPIM:

Within the COPIM project (Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs), we have been working to address the challenges of funding Open Access (OA) book publishing. Our particular focus is on how to make it easier for academic libraries to support OA publishers and publishing service providers, thinking beyond Book Processing Charges. We are very pleased to announce that one of the main outcomes of this work will soon be launched:

The collective will bring together OA publishers, OA publishing service providers, libraries, and other research institutions to create a new, mutually supportive ecosystem for the thriving of OA book publishing. At the heart of the work of the Open Book Collective (OBC) will be a new platform. This platform will make it far quicker and easier for libraries and others to financially support different OA publishers and service providers via membership offerings.

Introducing the Open Book Collective

The collective will bring together OA publishers, OA publishing service providers, libraries, and other research institutions to create a new, mutually supportive ecosystem for the thriving of OA book publishing. At the heart of the work of the Open Book Collective (OBC) will be a new platform. This platform will make it far quicker and easier for libraries and others to financially support different OA publishers and service providers via membership offerings.

 

Books Contain Multitudes: Exploring Experimental Publishing (2022 update) | Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Books Contain Multitudes: Exploring Experimental Publishing is a three-part research and scoping report created to support the Experimental Publishing and Reuse Work Package (WP 6) of the COPIM project. It also serves as a resource for the scholarly community, especially for authors and publishers interested in pursuing more experimental forms of book publishing. This is the second version of this report (you can find the first version here), which includes feedback from our community, updates, as well as new additions to predominantly sections 2 (typology) and 3 (workflows, tools, and platforms). For this second version of Books Contain Multitudes we have pulled in resources from another research report we have previously published on reuse and interaction with open access books, from a series of Twitter threads that we have shared online, and from feedback received over this past year on the first version of this report. The resources from this research report and the Twitter threads as well as the feedback received are now incorporated in section 3 of this report.

COPIM (Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs) is a 3-year project led by Coventry University as part of an international partnership of researchers, universities, librarians, open access (OA) book publishers and infrastructure providers and is funded by The Research England Development Fund and Arcadia—a charitable fund of Lisbet Rausing and Peter Baldwin. COPIM is building community-owned, open systems and infrastructures to enable OA book publishing to flourish, delivering major improvements in the infrastructures used by OA book publishers and those publishers making a transition to OA. The project addresses the key technological, structural, and organisational hurdles—around funding, production, dissemination, discovery, reuse, and archiving—that are standing in the way of the wider adoption and impact of OA books. COPIM will realign OA book publishing away from competing commercial service providers to a more horizontal and cooperative knowledge-sharing approach.

As part of seven connected Work Packages, COPIM will work on 1) integrated capacity-building amongst presses; 2) access to and development of consortial, institutional, and other funding channels; 3) development and piloting of appropriate business models; 4) cost reductions achieved by economies of scale; 5) mutually supportive governance models; 6) integration into library, repository, and digital learning environments; 7) the re-use of and experimentation with OA books; 8) the effective and robust archiving of OA content; and 9) knowledge transfer to stakeholders through various pilots.

In the Experimental Publishing and Reuse Work Package we are looking at ways to more closely align existing software, tools and technologies, workflows and infrastructures for experimental publishing with the workflows of OA book publishers. To do so, we have produced a set of pilot projects of experimental books, which are being developed with the aid of these new tools and workflows and integrated into COPIM’s infrastructures. As part of these pilot projects, relationships have been established with open source publishing platforms, software providers, and projects focused on experimental long-form publications and outreach activities have been and will be conducted with OA book publishers and authors to further promote experimental publishing opportunities. We have also explored how non-experimental OA books are (re)used by the scholarly community. As such, we have examined those technologies and cultural strategies that are most effective in promoting OA book content interaction and reuse. This includes building communities around content and collections via annotations, comments, and post-publication review (e.g., via the social annotation platform hypothes.is) to enable more collaborative forms of knowledge production. To achieve this, we have mapped both existing technological solutions as well as cultural barriers and best practices with respect to reuse as part of a research report on Promoting and Nurturing Interactions with Open Access Books: Strategies for Publishers and Authors.

We are also producing an online resource and toolkit, or Compendium, to promote and support the publication of experimental books. The ExPub Compendium will be an online resource which provides an easy-to-browse catalogue of experimental publishing tools, practices, examples of experimental books, and the relationships between them. This report has been produced to support b

Research Fellow (COPIM) 0.5 FTE, Fixed Term 01-08-2022 until 31-04-2023 | jobs.ac.uk

Coventry University is seeking to appoint a Research Fellow within the Centre for Postdigital Cultures, Faculty of Arts and Humanities to support the Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM) project.

The Centre for Postdigital Cultures (CPC), builds on the strong and distinctive track-record of scholars at Coventry University encompassing a range of disciplines in the arts and humanities. Led by Professor Gary Hall, the CPC explores how innovations in postdigital cultures can enable 21st century society to respond to the challenges it faces in relation to the digital at a global, national and local level.

COPIM is a strategic international partnership led by the Centre for Postdigital Cultures consisting of world-class universities, presses, libraries and infrastructure providers. The project addresses the key technological, structural, and organisational hurdles—around funding, production, dissemination, discovery, reuse, and archiving—that are standing in the way of the wider adoption and impact of open access (OA) books. COPIM will realign OA book publishing away from competing commercial service providers to a more horizontal and cooperative knowledge-sharing approach.

A Research Fellow is required to support the project’s PIs in conducting research on (best practices for) the governance of academic presses and collectively managed infrastructures. We are looking for an Open Access specialist with expert knowledge of academic book publishing processes and current developments in digital publishing. The Research Fellow will conduct research on best practices for governing collaborative community-based book publishing projects of various scales. They will also assist in the creation of a model for the long-term management of consortial library funding programs, including official policies and procedures for self-governance and administrative management of the infrastructure. In addition to that they will assist in the organisation of workshops and events to promote the project’s research and outputs.

Job: Research Fellow – COPIM | Centre for Postdigital Cultures, Coventry University

Research Fellow (COPIM), 0.5 FTE (Fixed Term 01-08-2022 until 31-04-2023)

Coventry University is seeking to appoint a Research Fellow within the Centre for Postdigital Cultures, Faculty of Arts and Humanities to support the Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM) project.

The Centre for Postdigital Cultures (CPC), builds on the strong and distinctive track-record of scholars at Coventry University encompassing a range of disciplines in the arts and humanities. Led by Professor Gary Hall, the CPC explores how innovations in postdigital cultures can enable 21st century society to respond to the challenges it faces in relation to the digital at a global, national and local level.

COPIM is a strategic international partnership led by the Centre for Postdigital Cultures consisting of world-class universities, presses, libraries and infrastructure providers. The project addresses the key technological, structural, and organisational hurdles—around funding, production, dissemination, discovery, reuse, and archiving—that are standing in the way of the wider adoption and impact of open access (OA) books. COPIM will realign OA book publishing away from competing commercial service providers to a more horizontal and cooperative knowledge-sharing approach.

A Research Fellow is required to support the project’s PIs in conducting research on (best practices for) the governance of academic presses and collectively managed infrastructures. We are looking for an Open Access specialist with expert knowledge of academic book publishing processes and current developments in digital publishing. The Research Fellow will conduct research on best practices for governing collaborative community-based book publishing projects of various scales. They will also assist in the creation of a model for the long-term management of consortial library funding programs, including official policies and procedures for self-governance and administrative management of the infrastructure. In addition to that they will assist in the organisation of workshops and events to promote the project’s research and outputs.

Library perspective: balancing investments and sustainability in Open Access

“The team at COPIM recently shared your CommonPlace blog post “Balancing Investments in Open Access: Sustainability and Innovation”. We found it really interesting to see evidence of libraries grappling with how to evaluate the proliferation of new OA models. What has the response been to your article?

One response was that Sharla Lair and Curtis Brundy edited a series of articles in CommonPlace, called “The Global Transition to Open.” It was gratifying to see that other libraries are also struggling with some of the issues I mentioned in my piece–how to keep up with all of the new open publishing models, and how to choose which initiatives to support. One potential way to combat this, as Marco Tullney and others noted, is to develop established workflows and evaluation criteria. I thought Alexia Hudson-Ward made a particularly compelling case that DEIA should be a core component of any such criteria. 

I’m also intrigued by the fact that some libraries seem to have dedicated, separate budget lines for supporting open scholarly initiatives. At the same time, I’m not convinced that having a dedicated budget line would really make the decision making process and administrative issues easier for us at Temple, as Demmy Verkebe says it does at KU Leuven. And honestly, I worry that separating open from the rest of collections might prevent us from seeing the big picture around how exactly this transition should happen. …”

Opening the Future: A New Model for Funding Open Access Monographs: The Serials Librarian: Vol 0, No 0

Abstract:  We outline the work of two university presses, with assistance from the Community-led Publishing Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM) Project, in creating an innovative revenue model to fund Open Access (OA) monographs at a traditional publisher. Building on library journal subscription models and on Knowledge Unlatched’s approach to monograph funding, this OA publishing model (called “Opening the Future”) gives members special access to a backlist, with the revenue then used to make the frontlist openly accessible. We also examine the general landscape of OA and funding models and discuss some of the challenges and benefits.

 

#RLUK22: Making Open Access Books Work Fairly: establishing collaboration between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers | Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Outline: Open Access (OA) book publishing, and the way it is funded, is changing. 2020 and 2021 saw the emergence of several new OA monograph initiatives based on collective library funding. Cambridge UP started Flip It Open, MIT Press launched Direct 2 Open and Liverpool UP and the Central European University Press launched Opening the Future. This session will give attendees a better understanding of the associated challenges facing libraries, publishers and scholars and will position these in the context of recent policy developments (UKRI OA monograph policy, the next REF, Plan S) and the rapidly developing OA landscape.  

Run by the non-profit, international COPIM Project, presentations and informal breakouts will give participants an understanding of a number of emerging OA book funding models and infrastructures that support smaller presses, based not on Book Processing Charges (BPCs) but on collective library funding. We’ll talk about how libraries might evaluate which OA book programmes align best with their institution and deliver the most relevant benefits. And we’ll discuss the importance of collaborative approaches for publishers and libraries, with a particular focus on the COPIM Project’s different types of collaboration, including Open Book Collective and Opening the Future: two OA monograph partnerships between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers.

 

Announcing CEU Press’s Fifth OA Book

Central European University (CEU) Press is pleased to announce the publication of a new book this week: Everyday Life under Communism and After: Consumption and Lifestyle in Hungary, 1945–2000 by Tibor Valuch. It is a fascinating look at how common people lived in Hungary during, and after, tumultuous regime changes.

 

#RLUK22: Making Open Access Books Work Fairly: establishing collaboration between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers | Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Open Access (OA) book publishing, and the way it is funded, is changing. 2020 and 2021 saw the emergence of several new OA monograph initiatives based on collective library funding. Cambridge UP started Flip It Open, MIT Press launched Direct 2 Open and Liverpool UP and the Central European University Press launched Opening the Future. This session will give attendees a better understanding of the associated challenges facing libraries, publishers and scholars and will position these in the context of recent policy developments (UKRI OA monograph policy, the next REF, Plan S) and the rapidly developing OA landscape.  

Run by the non-profit, international COPIM Project, presentations and informal breakouts will give participants an understanding of a number of emerging OA book funding models and infrastructures that support smaller presses, based not on Book Processing Charges (BPCs) but on collective library funding. We’ll talk about how libraries might evaluate which OA book programmes align best with their institution and deliver the most relevant benefits. And we’ll discuss the importance of collaborative approaches for publishers and libraries, with a particular focus on the COPIM Project’s different types of collaboration, including Open Book Collective and Opening the Future: two OA monograph partnerships between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers.