Publizieren in der Medienwissenschaft — Andreas Kirchner über Open Access als Standard | Open Media Studies

by Andreas Kirchner

englisch version via gTranslate:

I recently noticed that the editors of the journal MEDIENwissenschaft: Reviews | Reviews has started to specifically mark Open Access publications that are subject to review – a clear indication of a change in media studies publication practice. In book list 4/22, 64 out of 186 titles, a third of all publications listed there, bear the new “OA” abbreviation. This is not a bad rate, especially considering that the open access transformation of books has only picked up speed in recent years. The spectrum of the 19 publishers that published the books is enormous: imprints from the multinational publishing groups SpringerNature and Taylor & Francis are represented as well as various university presses or small scientific and non-fiction publishers such as Büchner or Frank & Timme. The Bielefelder transcript-Verlag occupies a special position, which in recent years has been particularly committed to establishing Open Access in German-language media studies: 17 OA books on the “Book List” have been published there alone. In this illustrious circle, the name of a publishing house can be found – and that at least four times -meson press .

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Implementing a Workflow for Combinatorial Books | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Bowie, S., Hall, G., & Kiesewetter, R. (2022). Implementing a Workflow for Combinatorial Books  . Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM). Retrieved from https://copim.pubpub.org/pub/combinatorial-books-documentation-workflows-post4

This is the fourth blogpost in a series documenting the COPIM/OHP Pilot Project Combinatorial Books: Gathering Flowers. You can find the previous blogposts here, here, and here.

Our aim in the Combinatorial Books: Gathering Flowers Pilot Project is among other things the development of a research, editorial, and publishing workflow that enables the creation of new combinatorial books out of existing open access books (or collections of books) in the Open Humanities Press (OHP) catalogue that are available for reuse. To support other publishers interested in establishing and maintaining similar workflows for combinatorial book publishing projects, we have been exploring how these kinds of books sit within more standardised or established print and online book production, dissemination, and preservation systems. The workflow we have created for OHP’s Combinatorial Books book series is available here: https://copim.pubpub.org/pub/workflow-for-combinatorial-books

In this blogpost, the publisher Gary Hall (OHP) and the Combinatorial Books series editor and developer Simon Bowie (COPIM) will share, via audio contributions, conceptual and practical insights around how we have created this publishing and technical workflow and how we have adapted it for Ecological Re-writing as Disappropriation. Situated Encounters with the Chernobyl Herbarium, the first book coming out of the Combinatorial Books: Gathering Flowers Pilot Project. Furthermore, we reflect on the socio-cultural adaptations to the editorial and publishing workflows that were needed to allow for more open and horizontal forms of community engagement.

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A workflow for Combinatorial Books | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Adema, J., Bowie, S., Hall, G., & Kiesewetter, R. (2022). A workflow for Combinatorial Books. Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM). Retrieved from https://copim.pubpub.org/pub/workflow-for-combinatorial-books

Experimental Book Publishing: Reinventing Editorial Workflows and Engaging Communities | CommonPlace, Series 2.2 Community-led Editorial Management

Adema, J., & Kiesewetter, R. (2022). Experimental Book Publishing: Reinventing Editorial Workflows and Engaging Communities; Commonplace. https://doi.org/10.21428/6ffd8432.8998ab82

The publication of experimental, digital work engenders different roles and relationalities, requiring “a kind of collaboration among authors, editors, and technical staff that is quite different from the traditional publishing process

 

Computational Publishing Pilot Project. Introducing Our Partners and Communities

Our last post on Computational Book Publishing by Simon Bowie kicked off our documentation of this COPIM WP6 Experimental Publishing Pilot Project, which consists of a collaboration between COPIM, the Open Science Lab at the Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) Hanover (working with Simon Worthington as the lead on this collaboration) and Open Book Publishers. The aim of this Pilot Project is to create a working prototype or proof of concept for the publication of computational books, based on real (sample) digital objects, and to adapt this to the publishing workflow of Open Book Publishers. The central question this pilot wants to address is how computational books—the combinations of text and executable code—can be integrated and made compatible with an existing publisher’s infrastructures and workflows for monograph publishing. We will be trying out various computational publishing tools to create this prototype, including Curvenote, Quarto, Jupyter Notebook, JupyterLab, and Jupyter Book.

Computational Publishing Pilot Project. Introducing Our Partners and Communities | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

by Janneke Adema

Our last post on Computational Book Publishing by Simon Bowie kicked off our documentation of this COPIM WP6 Experimental Publishing Pilot Project, which consists of a collaboration between COPIM, the Open Science Lab at the Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) Hanover (working with Simon Worthington as the lead on this collaboration) and Open Book Publishers. The aim of this Pilot Project is to create a working prototype or proof of concept for the publication of computational books, based on real (sample) digital objects, and to adapt this to the publishing workflow of Open Book Publishers. The central question this pilot wants to address is how computational books—the combinations of text and executable code—can be integrated and made compatible with an existing publisher’s infrastructures and workflows for monograph publishing. We will be trying out various computational publishing tools to create this prototype, including Curvenote, Quarto, Jupyter Notebook, JupyterLab, and Jupyter Book.

As this Pilot has seen a changing set of partners and institutions involved during its gestation and as beyond these partners there are several connections to other projects and communities, we wanted to use this blogpost to introduce the communities that are currently involved in the Pilot and are contributing to the extended work plan that has been developed as part of this collaboration.

 

From Mattering Press to the Open Book Collective: Interview with Joe Deville | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Corazza, F., & Fathallah, J. (2022). From Mattering Press to the Open Book Collective: Interview with Joe Deville. Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM). https://doi.org/10.21428/785a6451.ffebd406

As well as being the Chair of the Open Book Collective, due to launch soon, Joe Deville is one of the founders of Mattering Press, a small Open Access book publisher. We sat down with Joe to speak to him about how he became involved in Open Access publishing, some of the challenges that small publishers can face when starting up, and how his work with Mattering Press led to his involvement in the Open Book Collective.

 

Experimenting with repository workflows for archiving: Automated ingest | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

by Ross Higman

In a recent post, my colleague Miranda Barnes outlined the challenges of archiving and preservation for small and scholar-led open access publishers, and described the process of manually uploading books to the Loughborough University institutional repository. The conclusion of this manual ingest experiment was that while university repositories offer a potential route for open access archiving of publisher output, the manual workflow is prohibitively time- and resource-intensive, particularly for small and scholar-led presses who are often stretched in these respects.

Fortunately, many institutional repositories provide routes for uploading files and metadata which allow for the process to be automated, as an alternative to the standard web browser user interface. Different repositories offer different routes, but a large proportion of them are based on the same technologies. By experimenting with a handful of repositories, we were therefore able to investigate workflows which should also be applicable to a much broader spread of institutions.

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COPIM’s toolkit for running an Opening the Future programme at an academic press · Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

“In spring 2020, COPIM Work Package 3 started work on devising a new revenue model for university presses and open access books. Through a series of fact-finding meetings, workshops and reports the team gathered lots of information on the business models of scholarly presses with the aim of creating a sustainable revenue stream that would allow presses to publish their books openly, without using unaffordable book processing charges.

That research led to us devising and launching an innovative revenue model called Opening the Future in October 2020 with our first partner publisher Central European University (CEU) Press. In essence, it is a library subscription membership programme whereby the press provides term access to portions of their (closed) backlist books at a special price, and then uses the revenue from members’ subscriptions to allow the frontlist to be OA from the date of publication. This model presents a potential route for the mass and sustainable transition to OA of many small-to-mid sized university presses. Liverpool University Press (LUP), joined as our second project partner with their own Opening the Future initiative in June 2021. The programme is proving to be a success and, to date, the two presses have together accrued enough library funding to produce 10+ new OA monographs. Opening the Future continues to grow with both publishers. …”

Opening the Future: How to Implement an Equitable Revenue Model for Open Access Monographs | Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Eve, Martin Paul, Pinter, Frances, Poznanski, Emily, & Grady, Tom. (2022). Opening the Future: How to Implement an Equitable Revenue Model for Open Access Monographs (1.0). Zenodo. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.6907707

Abstract:

COVID-19 has thrown many aspects of university research culture into acute relief. As the reality of the virus dawned and campuses worldwide went into lockdown, publishers scrambled to unpaywall their research. Publishers made topical works and more general material openly available, through their own sites and platforms such as Project Muse and JSTOR. Physical collections became inaccessible and demand for openly accessible research skyrocketed. It is unclear that it is desirable to return to the previous systems of scholarly communication in the book publishing world, in which physical copies may remain affordable, even while e-licensing agreements for libraries are not.

This has been recognised in several recent global policy announcements including the cOAlition S/Plan S guidelines, and the recent UKRI consultation on OA. The latter’s proposed measures include the possibility of zero-embargo green OA, more liberal open licensing, and the long- vaunted requirement for funded monographs to be in scope. This last element built on a longstanding policy history in the UK foreshadowing a mandate for OA monographs.

That said, the path to OA monographs is not free of obstacles. Among the many issues, the most frequently raised is the business model of Book Processing Charges (BPCs) and their apparent unaffordability, mostly due to distributional allocation of library resources. Happily, several recent reports have detailed non-BPC OA revenue and business models that presses could use to transition to OA – one of the most recent being COPIM’s Revenue models for Open Access monographs 2020.

That report describes a variation on the journal ‘Subscribe to Open’ model whereby members ‘subscribe to a backlist, with the revenue then used to make the frontlist openly accessible’. This constitutes a new business model for OA monographs that had not previously been implemented. We implemented this model, dubbed ‘Opening the Future,’ in a partnership between the COPIM project, the Central European University Press (CEUP), and Liverpool University Press (LUP). This model presents a potential route for the mass and sustainable transition to OA of many small-to-mid sized university presses.

This document sets out how we implemented this model, including the documentation of challenges, resources, timetables, and activities. It is intended as a roadmap for other presses that wish to implement an ‘Opening the Future’-esque model. Of course, this document is unlikely to cover everything, but the authors are happy to respond to individual queries where this will prove helpful.

COPIM’s toolkit for running an Opening the Future programme at an academic press | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Grady, Tom, Eve, Martin P., & WP3 (2022). COPIM’s toolkit for running an Opening the Future programme at an academic press. Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM). https://copim.pubpub.org/pub/copim-toolkit-for-running-an-opening-the-future-programme

Step-by-step guide for presses that wish to implement an ‘Opening the Future’ model now published

 

New COPIM Scoping Report Published on Archiving and Preserving Open Access Monographs | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

by Miranda Barnes

Work Package 7 of the COPIM Project has released their Scoping Report, identifying and examining the key challenges associated with archiving and preserving open access monographs, particularly those published by small and scholar-led presses.

 

Open Access Monographs: Making Mandates Reality | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Eve, M. P., & Grady, T. (2022). Open Access Monographs: Making Mandates Reality. Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM). https://doi.org/10.21428/785a6451.89184c66

This half-day workshop galvanised a much-needed sector-wide conversation on OA monographs in the context of the UK’s policy landscape. Expert panels of speakers from the library, publishing and policy worlds outlined the current state-of-play and discussed how we can move to meet the imminent OA mandates from cOAlition S/Plan S in Europe and UKRI in the UK, and potential implications of the REF.

Featuring expert speakers from UKRI (Rachel Bruce) and Jisc (Caren Milloy), the event opened with a discussion of monograph policies and mandates before moving to an academic viewpoint from Professor Martin Eve (Birkbeck, University of London) who talked about various international OA funding models and the need to move quickly from pilot phases to business as usual.

The second half of the session touched briefly on the challenges of getting OA metadata into supply chains and systems often designed for closed books, and then discussed in more depth the concomitant challenges posed by metrics and reporting on OA books (Tasha Mellins-Cohen, Project Director at COUNTER). The afternoon closed with a view from the library perspective and expert speakers from the libraries at the Universities of York (Sarah Thompson), Aberdeen (Simon Bains) and Imperial College (Chris Banks) who spoke on how they are foregrounding OA at their institutions.

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Adema & Kiesewetter (2022) Re-use and/as Re-writing | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Adema, J., & Kiesewetter, R. (2022). Re-use and/as Re-writing. Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM). https://doi.org/10.21428/785a6451.a351f151 Adema, J., & Kiesewetter, R. (2022). Re-use and/as Re-writing. Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM). https://doi.org/10.21428/785a6451.a351f151 Adema, J., & Kiesewetter, R. (2022). Re-use and/as Re-writing. Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM). https://doi.org/10.21428/785a6451.a351f151 Adema, J., & Kiesewetter, R. (2022). Re-use and/as Re-writing. Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM). https://doi.org/10.21428/785a6451.a351f151Adema, J., & Kiesewetter, R. (2022). Re-use and/as Re-writing. Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM). https://doi.org/10.21428/785a6451.a351f151

Depending on the type of open licence, open access publications allow for the re-use of already published content. In addition to this, collaborative editing and writing tools enable further engagement with and around published works by (communities of) authors. The interactive and collaborative potential of open books can add further value and new avenues and formats that go beyond the more obvious benefits of open access, such as, for example, enhancing the discovery and online consultation (Snijder, 2019) of scholarly publications. 

Re-use can take different forms, being highly context-specific. Imagine, for example, a collage text entirely composed of text snippets, or a remix in which two existing texts are woven together in the fashion of a parallel montage. Re-use mobilises combinatorial creativity, or the process of combining existing ideas to produce something new, that can be perceived as a critique of the idea of the original genius, or, in the context of academia, of the single liberal humanist author (Popova, 2011). Re-use might also involve creating new communities and conversations around already existing books and texts, for example by means of gathering together comments and annotations, and adding hyperlinks. It can additionally foster experimentation with more social and open forms of performing humanities scholarship and scholarly interaction with and around books: for example, through open peer review and networked books. Other forms of re-use can be directed towards the updating, translating, modifying, reviewing, versioning, and forking of existing books. Combinatorial Books will experiment with such possibilities in theory and practice in order to stimulate, explore, and practice the full range of social book interactions made possible by open access. As such, it aims to promote the reuse of open access books as part of a workflow that enables the creation of new publications out of existing ones. Engaging with re-use in this way implies the adaptation of existing workflows, systems, practices, and licensing. However, these can be, as we hope to show in this series of blogposts, relatively simple, low-key adaptations that do not have to be labour- and cost-intensive and do not necessarily require advanced technological expertise.

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