#RLUK22: Making Open Access Books Work Fairly: establishing collaboration between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers | Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Outline: Open Access (OA) book publishing, and the way it is funded, is changing. 2020 and 2021 saw the emergence of several new OA monograph initiatives based on collective library funding. Cambridge UP started Flip It Open, MIT Press launched Direct 2 Open and Liverpool UP and the Central European University Press launched Opening the Future. This session will give attendees a better understanding of the associated challenges facing libraries, publishers and scholars and will position these in the context of recent policy developments (UKRI OA monograph policy, the next REF, Plan S) and the rapidly developing OA landscape.  

Run by the non-profit, international COPIM Project, presentations and informal breakouts will give participants an understanding of a number of emerging OA book funding models and infrastructures that support smaller presses, based not on Book Processing Charges (BPCs) but on collective library funding. We’ll talk about how libraries might evaluate which OA book programmes align best with their institution and deliver the most relevant benefits. And we’ll discuss the importance of collaborative approaches for publishers and libraries, with a particular focus on the COPIM Project’s different types of collaboration, including Open Book Collective and Opening the Future: two OA monograph partnerships between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers.

 

Announcing CEU Press’s Fifth OA Book

Central European University (CEU) Press is pleased to announce the publication of a new book this week: Everyday Life under Communism and After: Consumption and Lifestyle in Hungary, 1945–2000 by Tibor Valuch. It is a fascinating look at how common people lived in Hungary during, and after, tumultuous regime changes.

 

#RLUK22: Making Open Access Books Work Fairly: establishing collaboration between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers | Community-Led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

Open Access (OA) book publishing, and the way it is funded, is changing. 2020 and 2021 saw the emergence of several new OA monograph initiatives based on collective library funding. Cambridge UP started Flip It Open, MIT Press launched Direct 2 Open and Liverpool UP and the Central European University Press launched Opening the Future. This session will give attendees a better understanding of the associated challenges facing libraries, publishers and scholars and will position these in the context of recent policy developments (UKRI OA monograph policy, the next REF, Plan S) and the rapidly developing OA landscape.  

Run by the non-profit, international COPIM Project, presentations and informal breakouts will give participants an understanding of a number of emerging OA book funding models and infrastructures that support smaller presses, based not on Book Processing Charges (BPCs) but on collective library funding. We’ll talk about how libraries might evaluate which OA book programmes align best with their institution and deliver the most relevant benefits. And we’ll discuss the importance of collaborative approaches for publishers and libraries, with a particular focus on the COPIM Project’s different types of collaboration, including Open Book Collective and Opening the Future: two OA monograph partnerships between libraries, publishers, and infrastructure providers.

 

RLUK22 Conference Video: Making Open Access Books Work Fairly

Open Access (OA) book publishing, and the way it is funded, is changing. 2020 and 2021 saw the emergence of several new OA monograph initiatives based on collective library funding. Cambridge UP started Flip It Open, MIT Press launched Direct 2 Open and Liverpool UP and the Central European University Press launched Opening the Future. This session will give a better understanding of the associated challenges facing libraries, publishers and scholars and will position these in the context of recent policy developments (UKRI OA monograph policy, the next REF, Plan S) and the rapidly developing OA landscape.

Open Access Books-Making it Work | Liverpool John Moores University community on YouTube

This roundtable discussion, chaired by Tom Mosterd, one of the three coordinators at the Open Access Books Network (OABN) and Community Manager at the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB), will highlight three different experiences of how to make Open Access book publishing work in an equitable and sustainable way:

Charles Watkinson (Associate University Librarian for Publishing and Director of University of Michigan Press) will share his experience from a more ‘traditional’ university publisher that is now developing a consortial library publishing programme, called Fund to Mission, to significantly step up their OA book publishing and to move away from a Book Processing Charge (BPC) model as they do so.

Demmy Verbeke (Head of Artes, KU Leuven Libraries and associate professor of Open Scholarship at the Faculty of Arts, KU Leuven) will discuss how KU Leuven Libraries have developed a fund called Fair OA Fund, which has been designed to make sure there is institutional money available to support innovative and non-profit OA initiatives, including books, journals, and infrastructure, alongside APCs/BPCs and TAs.

Lucy Barnes (COPIM and Open Book Publishers) will talk about building community-owned and governed infrastructure to support and expand the publication of OA books, and the importance of international partnerships in funding, sharing and publishing OA.

Fourth OA Book Funded by Opening the Future

We’re pleased to announce that our project partner Central European University (CEU) Press has released another book, fully funded as open access through our Opening the Future project, thanks to library support. Published last week it is now available for free download and also available to buy in print.

Memory Crash: Politics of History In and Around Ukraine, 1980s-2010s by Georgiy Kasianov is a timely reminder that issues of the past worry people no less than issues of the present – with controversies around how a country’s history is interpreted often turning both public and state realms into battlefields of memory. This book is an account of the historical politics in Ukraine embedded within the broader European context, with lessons for countries beyond.

 

Open Access Monographs: Myths, Truths and Implications in the Wake of UKRI Open Access Policy | LIBER Quarterly

The UK Research and Innovation funding council announced its latest Open Access Policy on August 6, 2021. This policy applies to all UKRI funded research, and thus constitutes a significant move towards OA as an academic standard. For the first time in the UK, OA is to be mandated for academic books – this means that both monographs and edited chaptered books must be published Open Access from January 2024, though a 1 year embargo is permissible. As the infrastructures, business models and workflows supporting OA book publishing are currently lagging behind journals, especially in the Arts and Humanities, many researchers and institutions have responded to the policy with some consternation, even whilst supporting the aims and ethics of OA publishing.

This article explores some of these apprehensions and questions raised by institutions, academics and by librarians regarding OA book publishing in a UK context, especially regarding funding and sustainability. It aims to dispel certain myths around OA book publishing in general, particularly the notion that Book Processing Charges are a necessary or even desirable element. The article then presents some of the varied models and systems currently in use and development, particularly the work of the UKRI/Research England funded COPIM project (Community- Led Open Access Infrastructures for Monographs), one of the aims of which is to build ways of delivering more sustainable revenue sources to OA publishers. It focuses in particular a key and soon to be launched output of the project: the Open Book Collective.

Spineless Wonders: The Global Book roundtable | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

During the Spineless Wonders Conference on 12 November 2021, Patrick Hart and Rebekka Kiesewetter discussed the ways in which scholarly OA output — and modes of engagement with it outside the Anglo-American global North — articulate with questions of the global, globalisation, and globality.

This is a transcript of our initial contribution to the roundtable, which was chaired by Dr Heather H. Yeung (University of Dundee) and Prof. Tim Brennan (Manchester School of Art). The other contributors were Prof. Tom Mole (Durham University) and Prof. Ashleigh Harris (Uppsala University).

A Fork in the Road: OA Books and Visibility-Value in the Humanities | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

by Martin Paul Eve

One of the great advantages of open access in the scientific disciplines is that the work of scientists can now be read by any interested party with internet access. While some readers will not be able to understand this, it is nonetheless easy for scientists to show their work. No longer must the public merely take on faith that scientists are doing their job. Instead, those publics can read the findings for themselves. There is self-evidential justificatory benefit for disciplines that make their research open.

Yet what of the humanities and social sciences? In these disciplines, the monograph plays a substantial role in the dissemination of research. But, frequently, these volumes are extremely expensive because they do not see huge print runs. Progress towards open access for book-length work remains frustratingly slow.

[…]

A Fork in the Road: OA Books and Visibility-Value in the Humanities · COPIM

“What we see emerging at this time, as a result, is a dual system in which all scientific research will be available to anyone to read, free of charge, while the most significant work in the humanities and social sciences will remain extremely expensive and less visible in the digital world.

This should be grave cause for concern. The humanities, in particular, face a perpetual crisis of value, in which these subjects are called to account for their existence and are asked to re-articulate their societal virtues. But the arguments grow thinner. How can the humanities parrot the oft-repeated liberal humanist line that they exist to produce an educated citizenry capable of participating critically in democracy, when most humanities work remains unreadable by most people?…

Learned societies in the humanities should be concerned (and they are). However, this concern should not be for the revenue streams that they feel are threatened by open access to journal subscriptions, but instead for the future of their disciplines in a world where they cannot justify themselves….

EU Press’ Opening the Future Programme Publishes 2nd OA Book

We are pleased to announce that Opening the Future at Central European University Press has accrued enough library support to publish another open access (OA) monograph: Constructing Identities over Time: “Bad Gypsies” and “Good Roma” in Russia and Hungary by Jekatyerina Dunajeva. This is hot on the heels of the release of our first OA book; the programme is gaining momentum and already making a difference with five books in total now funded and available, or in production.

Opening the Future at CEU Press is a cost-effective way for libraries to increase their digital collections on the history and culture of Central and Eastern Europe and the former communist countries. Subscribing libraries get unlimited multi-user access to curated packages of books, with perpetual access after three years. The Press uses membership funds to produce new frontlist titles in open access format. All OA titles are available via Project MUSE, OAPEN and the Open Research Library, and are findable on DOAB. 

CEU Press publish 2nd Opening the Future OA Book

COPIM is pleased to announce that the Opening the Future programme at Central European University Press has accrued enough library support to publish another open access (OA) monograph: Constructing Identities over Time: “Bad Gypsies” and “Good Roma” in Russia and Hungary by Jekatyerina Dunajeva. This is hot on the heels of the release of their first OA book.