PLOS Expands Footprint in Sweden With a New Publishing Agreement With the Bibsam Consortium

The Public Library of Science (PLOS) today announced an agreement with the Bibsam Consortium to participate in PLOS’ three innovative publishing models. This two-year agreement provides researchers from affiliated institutions with unlimited publishing privileges in PLOS journals without incurring fees.

Libraries Sign Agreement to Eliminate Fees for PLOS Authors | Syracuse University News

Syracuse University Libraries has signed an agreement with PLOS that will take effect in 2022 eliminating author fees for individual corresponding Syracuse University authors. This transformative agreement is on the heels of the first one signed with the American Chemical Society in spring 2021. These agreements expand University researchers’ scientific contributions by allowing authors to make their article open access at no cost to the author. Open access provides students, faculty and researchers with scholarly work that is published, online, free of charge and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.

PLOS Expands Footprint with a Publishing Agreement in Germany | Lab Manager

“The Public Library of Science (PLOS) is pleased to announce an agreement with Sachsen Consortia to facilitate unlimited publishing across all 12 PLOS titles with no fees for researchers. This agreement encompasses PLOS’ three innovative publishing models, ensuring researchers from 11 Saxon institutions benefit from frictionless, fee-free publishing with PLOS. This agreement represents PLOS’ second major consortia deal in the European Union….”

WSU Libraries join PLoS Medicine, PLoS Biology model for open access publishing – WSU Insider

“The WSU Libraries have partnered with Public Library of Science’s Community Action Publishing (CAP) model, allowing WSU authors to publish open access articles accepted by PLoS Medicine and PLoS Biology journals without paying article processing charges (APCs).

More libraries and library consortia worldwide are contracting with publishers under such transformative agreements that shift pay structures from subscription-based reading to open access publishing. Under the CAP model, the cost of publishing is distributed more equitably among representative institutions based on the publication needs of both corresponding and contributing authors….”

PLOS Announces New Publishing Agreements with CRL and NERL – The Official PLOS Blog

“In concert with Open Access Week, the Public Library of Science (PLOS) is pleased to announce an agreement with NorthEast Research Libraries (NERL) and the Center for Research Libraries (CRL) to participate in PLOS’ three innovative publishing models. This three-year agreement provides researchers from NERL and CRL affiliated institutions with unlimited publishing privileges in PLOS journals without incurring fees. NERL and CRL combined have more than 200 Members….

All PLOS journals are underpinned by existing – and new – institutional business models that move beyond the APC to ensure more equitable and regionally appropriate ways to support Open Access publishing. PLOS’ institutional models are Community Action Publishing (CAP)[1], Flat Fees [2], and the Global Equity model[3]. PLOS will waive the annual fee if a member institution is in a Research4Life country….”

A Frankfurt Masterclass: PLOS, CCC, and How Open Is Open Access?

“The program looks at the nonprofit open-access publisher  Public Library of Science, better known in the acronym-laden world of scholarly publishing as PLOS.

As the program’s promotional descriptive material puts it, the center of PLOS’ approach is its “community action publishing” model, called CAP, which “relies on a flexible, sophisticated workflow that enables authors to publish open access easily, with or without funding under a formal PLOS publishing agreement.” …

“We really need to think about the missing voices,” says [Niamh O’Connor]. “Research is a global, collaborative enterprise. And we really need, as we transition to an open science future, to keep asking ourselves, open for whom? Because openness in itself, while valuable, doesn’t tackle all of the inequality in scholarly communications. It doesn’t increase inclusion, and the need for universal and equitable access to scientific knowledge and education is super-important.” …”

Open-access publisher PLOS pushes to extend clout beyond biomedicine

“Non-profit life-sciences publisher PLOS is gunning for a bigger share of science beyond the biomedical realm with the launch of five journals in fields where open science is less widely adopted. They will be its first new titles in 14 years. It is also piloting a new open-access business model, in a bid to spread the cost of publishing more equally among researchers….

The new business model is the first shake-up at the publisher for a while, and has been eagerly anticipated….

 The publisher’s financial history is chequered. It first broke even in 2010. In recent years it has fallen into deficit, with 2019 the first year that it made an operating surplus since 2015….

The idea behind the new model is that the cost of publishing a paper is spread more equally across all of the authors’ institutions, rather than the corresponding author’s institution or funder footing the bill, as is standard with an article processing charge. PLOS says that as more members join the scheme, it will become cheaper for researchers to publish papers. So far, more than 75 institutions in 8 countries have signed up….

PLOS’s chief publishing officer, Niamh O’Connor, says that PLOS hopes to circumvent the idea that open access moves the cost of publishing a paper from the reader to the author. “While the article-processing model has allowed open access to develop, we don’t see that as the future,” she says. “We are working to a future where those barriers are removed.” …”

For Institutions – PLOS

“At PLOS, we believe science should be shared globally, with everyone, regardless of ability to pay to read or publish. We believe APCs are just one part of a mixed-model ecosystem. And we believe partnership in collaboration with research institutions, consortia, funders, and service providers can achieve a truly open to read, open to publish framework for researchers…”

For Institutions – PLOS

“At PLOS, we believe science should be shared globally, with everyone, regardless of ability to pay to read or publish. We believe APCs are just one part of a mixed-model ecosystem. And we believe partnership in collaboration with research institutions, consortia, funders, and service providers can achieve a truly open to read, open to publish framework for researchers…”

PLOS Community Action Publishing (CAP): Q1 Community Update

“Since PLOS launched PLOS Community Action Publishing (CAP) in 2020, we’ve seen tremendous engagement with the model and uptake from across the scholcomm community. We’d like to use this webinar to reintroduce both journals to the library community, provide an update on our progress to goal, welcome new community members, and answer any questions the library community may have on this new collective action model.”

PLOS Community Action Publishing (CAP): Q1 Community Update

“Since PLOS launched PLOS Community Action Publishing (CAP) in 2020, we’ve seen tremendous engagement with the model and uptake from across the scholcomm community. We’d like to use this webinar to reintroduce both journals to the library community, provide an update on our progress to goal, welcome new community members, and answer any questions the library community may have on this new collective action model.”

PLOS and Uppsala University Announce Publishing Deal – The Official PLOS Blog

“Uppsala University and the Public Library of Science (PLOS) today announced two 3-year publishing agreements that allow researchers to publish in PLOS journals without incurring article processing charges (APC). The Community Action Publishing (CAP) agreement enables Uppsala University researchers to publish fee-free in PLOS Medicine and PLOS Biology. The Flat fee agreement also allows them to publish in PLOS ONE and PLOS’ community journals[1]. These models shift publishing costs from authors to research institutions based on prior publishing history and anticipated future growth with PLOS….”

MIT Libraries develop innovative open access agreements with PLOS | MIT Libraries News

“The MIT Libraries has negotiated two new open-access publishing agreements with the nonprofit publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS) that allow all MIT authors to publish in all PLOS titles with no publishing fees. The agreement aligns with the core principles of the MIT Framework for Publisher Contracts.

The aim of the PLOS agreements is to remove the burden of cost of publishing articles from authors and allow MIT to support authors who publish open access. Instead of authors paying article processing charges (or APCs, payments charged to authors or their institutions to make a work available open access), PLOS charges the Institute transparent and equitable fees as guided by the Plan S Price and Service Transparency Framework.

“PLOS recognizes that APCs create barriers for some researchers to publish open access and contribute to inequity in scholarly communications,” said Chris Bourg, director of MIT Libraries. “This agreement was a true collaboration made possible by our shared goals of openness, equity, and transparency.”

Acknowledging that most research is a collaborative effort, these agreements break new ground by making all MIT authors, corresponding and contributing, eligible. Further aligning with MIT’s values, all authors from Research4Life countries are included in the Collective Action Publishing agreement; Research4Lifeprovides low-and middle-income countries with online access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content….”

MIT Libraries develop innovative open access agreements with PLOS | MIT Libraries News

“The MIT Libraries has negotiated two new open-access publishing agreements with the nonprofit publisher Public Library of Science (PLOS) that allow all MIT authors to publish in all PLOS titles with no publishing fees. The agreement aligns with the core principles of the MIT Framework for Publisher Contracts.

The aim of the PLOS agreements is to remove the burden of cost of publishing articles from authors and allow MIT to support authors who publish open access. Instead of authors paying article processing charges (or APCs, payments charged to authors or their institutions to make a work available open access), PLOS charges the Institute transparent and equitable fees as guided by the Plan S Price and Service Transparency Framework.

“PLOS recognizes that APCs create barriers for some researchers to publish open access and contribute to inequity in scholarly communications,” said Chris Bourg, director of MIT Libraries. “This agreement was a true collaboration made possible by our shared goals of openness, equity, and transparency.”

Acknowledging that most research is a collaborative effort, these agreements break new ground by making all MIT authors, corresponding and contributing, eligible. Further aligning with MIT’s values, all authors from Research4Life countries are included in the Collective Action Publishing agreement; Research4Lifeprovides low-and middle-income countries with online access to academic and professional peer-reviewed content….”

Open Access Publishing in PLOS Biology Free for NC State Authors | NC State University Libraries

“The NC State University Libraries and the Public Library of Science (PLOS) have entered into an agreement for NC State University researchers to participate in PLOS’ Community Action Publishing (CAP) program. The CAP program is led by PLOS and aims to sustain highly selective journal publishing without Article Processing Charges (APCs) for authors. “Community Action Publishing takes into account the contributions of every author — not just corresponding authors — to help distribute publishing costs equitably among the institutions who support them. This ensures institutional members are charged a fair fee based solely on their authors’ publishing history.” (PLOS website). …”