Special Collection Learning from Lockdown: challenges and benefits | Journal of Interactive Media in Education

Collection launched: 11 Aug 2021

The articles in this collection reflect different perspectives; of students, teaching staff and administrators; and of managers and leaders across very different institutions worldwide as decisions were made about how to respond to the pandemic and provide ‘emergency remote education’.

Authors reflect on how educational technology supported higher education provision during this time, yet although the perspectives are different, common themes emerged such as the importance to promote care and community – a principle which can inform future practice. Another theme is that of professional development for academics and teaching staff, and how best to support this during challenging times in a sustainable way. Similarly particular challenges for accessibility during the pandemic were reported and here too, suggested approaches to supporting accessibility follow sustainability principles to make them relevant for the future. Tackling inequity is another related theme found in more than one contribution including an approach taken by a USA liberal arts college to make all supporting materials for their courses free materials (such as open educational resources, OER).

The papers also represent different research methods and approaches, including a longitudinal study, surveys, interviews, student artefacts, meeting notes, workshop and course evaluations and recordings of managers’ meetings and decision making.

Guest Editors: Ann Jones and Katy Jordan

Study: Idea sharing increases online learner engagement | Illinois

“Sharing ideas in an online learning environment has a distinct advantage over sharing personal details in driving learner engagement in massive open online courses, more commonly known as MOOCs, says new research co-written by a University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign expert who studies the intersection of marketing and digital environments.

Online learning engagement can be increased by nearly one-third by simply prompting students to share course ideas in a discussion forum rather than having them share information about their identity or personal motivations for enrolling, said Unnati Narang, a professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business….”

Dr Ben Whitburn: the process of adopting an updated and more accessible open textbook | Australian Open Textbooks as Social Justice

Dr Ben Whitburn is Senior Lecturer of Education (Inclusive Education) responsible for course leadership and teaching pre-service teachers at Deakin University. Here is an edited version of what he had to say about the process of reviewing and adopting an open textbook (OER) as a major course resource.

Using Wikipedia to teach scholarly peer review | Journal of Information Literacy

Abstract:  This paper outlines a creative Wikipedia-based project developed by the University of Kansas (KU) Libraries and the KU Biology Department. Inspired by the tenets of open pedagogy, the purpose of this project is to use Wikipedia as a way for students to learn about the scholarly peer review process while also producing material that can be shared and used by the world outside the classroom. The paper is divided into three sections, with the first summarizing pertinent related literature related to the paper’s topic. From here, the paper describes the proposed assignment, detailing a process wherein students write new articles for the encyclopedia which are then anonymously peer reviewed by other students in the class; when articles are deemed acceptable, they are published via Wikipedia. The parallels between this project and academic peer review are emphasized throughout. The paper closes by discussing the importance of this project, arguing that it fills a known scholarly need, actively produces knowledge, furthers the aims of the open access movement, and furthers scientific outreach initiatives.

 

Navigating the 5S’s of Open Pedagogy Projects: A Roadmap for Educators

By Christina Riehman-Murphy and Bryan McGeary

Open pedagogy projects take advantage of the internet to invite educators and students into a new relationship with both knowledge and one another. They are immensely rewarding and they require significant planning. In a time when educators and students have been thrown into a constant state of flux, taking on an open pedagogy project might seem a bit daunting. To help ease this process, we created The Open Pedagogy Project Roadmap, a project management resource designed to guide instructors in planning, finding support for, sharing and sustaining an open pedagogy project, regardless of its size or scope. The Roadmap will help instructors navigate what we’ve called the 5S’s of open pedagogy projects: Scope, Support, Students, Sharing and Sustaining.

Open pedagogy projects are multifaceted, can be single-semester or multiyear and can result in any number of student-authored/-created/-directed scholarly outputs or non-scholarly products. These outputs could include, for example, a public-facing blog post, translating a Wikipedia page, creating a digital scholarly edition, socially annotating via a platform like Hypothes.is, revising an open textbook, or contributing to crowdsourced transcription projects.

Although open pedagogy has been defined in many different ways, the common threads weaving throughout the many examples are that opening up pedagogy invites students to be collaborative co-creators of information who have agency in deciding if and how their work is openly shared to various publics. Thus, open pedagogy projects tend to be collaborative, experiential and situated ones which challenge traditional classroom hierarchies.

More to Open Access than research | Campus Morning Mail

“The advantages of open access (OA) publishing focussed on scientific publishing in 2020, the year of COVID-19. Can it benefit higher education teaching and learning practice too?…

As an example, the Student Success journal is the result of a simple question posed by a leading academic: How do we keep dynamic conference and symposia conversations related to teaching and learning going, outside events?…

Instead, the Journal pivots towards its strengths as an OA publication. Indexed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Student Success is only one of nine Australian OA journals that meet its specific criteria for best practice in OA publishing. There are no article processing charges  and authors retain copyright while articles are licenced via Creative Commons Attribution License, which ensures the content can be used and reused. Authors are encouraged to submit research on practice that clearly identifies elements transferable to other domains and detail how a specific initiative contributes to the broader knowledge base….”

The Libraries’ Open Pedagogy Incubator: Sharing information, lowering barriers, and engaging more learners | NC State University Libraries

“Open pedagogy is far-reaching and flexible by nature, so it makes sense that many people implement approaches that align with its tenets before they even know the term. And open pedagogy continues to evolve as more people take it up. It is flexible, sometimes mercurial, and always…well, open….”

 

Library as Key Partner in Open Pedagogy (part 1) – YouTube

“As part of the author series from Open Pedagogy Approaches: Faculty, Library, and Student Collaborations, you are invited to discover different ways in which faculty, library staff, and students work together to engage and enrich the learning process.

In this workshop, authors Anne Brown and Amanda MacDonald (Virginia Tech) will share their work from the chapter, Open Pedagogical Practices to Train Undergraduates in the Research Process: A Case Study in Course Design and Co-Teaching Strategies. Following, Laurie Taylor and Brian Keith (University of Florida) will discuss the ideas in their chapter, Open Pedagogical Design for Graduate Student Internships, A New Collaborative Model….”

Library as Key Partner in Open Pedagogy (part 1) – YouTube

“As part of the author series from Open Pedagogy Approaches: Faculty, Library, and Student Collaborations, you are invited to discover different ways in which faculty, library staff, and students work together to engage and enrich the learning process.

In this workshop, authors Anne Brown and Amanda MacDonald (Virginia Tech) will share their work from the chapter, Open Pedagogical Practices to Train Undergraduates in the Research Process: A Case Study in Course Design and Co-Teaching Strategies. Following, Laurie Taylor and Brian Keith (University of Florida) will discuss the ideas in their chapter, Open Pedagogical Design for Graduate Student Internships, A New Collaborative Model….”

Open Access Week 2020: Open Pedagogy, Equity, & Inclusive Teaching | Open Access @ UNT

“Please join the UNT Libraries for a virtual roundtable discussion of “Open Pedagogy, Equity, & Inclusive Teaching” in celebration of International Open Access Week.

This roundtable discussion will feature faculty from both UNT and other institutions who are actively engaged in developing open pedagogical practices, using or creating Open Educational Resources (OER), and promoting Open Access principles to address questions of equity, diversity, and inclusion in their teaching and scholarship. They will offer examples of projects they’re working on and speak to some of the larger questions around the value and importance of Open Access, especially in higher education….”

As Universities Switch to Online Teaching, Digital Collections of Libraries and Publishers Take Centerstage | Open Research Community

“The importance of Open Access for university libraries and academic publishers is slated to increase, as printed books and in-person access become deemphasized in the COVID-19 context….

In North America, the pandemic onset has accelerated the evolution of university libraries toward closer involvement with supporting the digital access needs of students and researchers. On the one hand, this has spurred the launch of publisher-led projects targeted at the higher education market. On the other hand, scholarly publishers, such as ProQuest, make extra efforts to integrate Open Access into the panoply of their offerings that span both paywalled and freely accessible content (Enis, 2020).

 

In this respect, Open Access books and resources are likely to demand less copyright compliance management than their closed access counterparts. Additionally, Open Access does not involve the access uncertainty that free access usually does, as journal and book publishers wind down their free access deals with the presence of COVID-19 becoming the new normal. In this context, renewable subscription models gain in uptake, as vendors factor in library budget shortfalls into their product structures (Enis, 2020)….”

Open and affordable textbooks: approaches to OER pedagogy | Emerald Insight

Abstract:  Purpose

Following is an overview of the open and affordable textbooks (OAT) program, strategies for outreach, as well as discuss approaches that faculty awardees have taken to designing their courses. This paper aims to address a couple issues such as the effectiveness of open educational resources (OER) resources, the process of creating OER resources and how faculty and instructors have updated their courses and adjusted their pedagogy.

 

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes five cases where the faculty adopted open pedagogy. They include a general chemistry course, psychiatry clerkship, microbiology lab, a medical Spanish course and a radiology elective in a medical school.

 

Findings

The use of open pedagogy promotes two things: up-to-date resources and practical experience. Since the creation of the Rutgers OAT program, faculty and instructors have been rethinking how they teach their courses. Students enjoy the content more and faculty loves the increase in engagement. As the program continues to grow, the creativity fostered by open pedagogy improves education for everyone involved.

 

Originality/value

The paper offers a general overview of an effective open and affordable program at a public research university. It demonstrated the effectiveness of the program while also offering examples of novel course materials for interested librarians and faculty. It opens the possibility from just finding resources to creating them and how they improve education.

Informed Open Pedagogy and Information Literacy Instruction in Student-Authored Open Projects – Open Pedagogy Approaches

“Open pedagogy has often been touted as empowering, liberating, and revolutionary. While many interpretations of the term open pedagogy exist, this chapter specifically focuses on an open pedagogy in which students are creating openly licensed works in a classroom environment. Open pedagogy affords librarians, instructors, and students a unique way to guide how courses are taught and how students learn. However, while working openly can be empowering, liberating, or even revolutionary, I argue that it is unethical to mandate or strongly encourage students to produce open work without themselves understanding the implications of working openly. I argue that it is only when students understand the political intent behind these types of open projects?—speaking to a much broader open education and open access movement?—that they might decide for themselves to continue to engage in and support open work. Open practice is only powerful when the students involved understand why they are engaging in this work and deciding for themselves that this is something they are personally and politically invested in. Furthermore, it is only when students understand the concept of open and their own rights as authors that they can ethically engage in this type of open pedagogy.

In other words, if we are using open pedagogy to encourage students to themselves be part of the open education movement, then students must understand what open practice is and how it relates to their own lives. I posit an informed open pedagogy that 1) teaches students about, and brings students into, the greater open education movement, in which 2) students decide individually and negotiate as a whole their preferred individual and collective authorship that lastly, 3) allows students to opt-out at any point in the class, or later can provide a more ethical design to open pedagogical practices. This informed open pedagogy can be elicited through the practices of information literacy instruction….”

Do students lose depth in digital reading?

“Do students learn as much when they read digitally as they do in print?…

Most studies have found that participants scored about the same when reading in each medium, though a few have indicated that students performed better on tests when they read in print….

Some researchers are beginning to pose more nuanced questions, including one scholar who has considered what happens when people read a story in print or on a digital device and are then asked to reconstruct the plot sequence. The answer: Print yielded better results.

Another aspect of learning is to see how outcomes differ when students are doing their reading in less prescriptive experimental conditions. One study let students choose how much time to spend when reading on each platform. The researchers found that participants devoted less time to reading the passage onscreen – and performed less well on the subsequent comprehension test….

When asked on which medium they felt they concentrated best, 92 percent replied “print.” For long academic readings, 86 percent favored print. Participants also reported being more likely to reread academic materials if they were in print….”

Do students lose depth in digital reading?

“Do students learn as much when they read digitally as they do in print?…

Most studies have found that participants scored about the same when reading in each medium, though a few have indicated that students performed better on tests when they read in print….

Some researchers are beginning to pose more nuanced questions, including one scholar who has considered what happens when people read a story in print or on a digital device and are then asked to reconstruct the plot sequence. The answer: Print yielded better results.

Another aspect of learning is to see how outcomes differ when students are doing their reading in less prescriptive experimental conditions. One study let students choose how much time to spend when reading on each platform. The researchers found that participants devoted less time to reading the passage onscreen – and performed less well on the subsequent comprehension test….

When asked on which medium they felt they concentrated best, 92 percent replied “print.” For long academic readings, 86 percent favored print. Participants also reported being more likely to reread academic materials if they were in print….”