Where Does Enhancement End and Citation Begin?

As more publishers semantically enrich documents, Todd Carpenter considers whether links are the same as citations

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Transforming Scholarly Publishing With Blockchain Technologies and AI: An Interview with Darrell Gunter

Today we feature an interview with Darrell W. Gunter, the editor of a new book on Transforming Scholarly Publishing With Blockchain Technologies and AI.

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Guest Post — Fifty Shades of Hybrid Conferences: Why Publishers Should Care (and How You Can Help)

Since in-person events are likely not going away, and neither are virtual ones, conference organizers are left with the most complex of options: hybrid. How can scholarly publishers help?

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The Charleston Conference — Trailblazing the Return to In-Person Events

Interview with Leah Hinds, ExecDir of Charleston Hub, reflecting on preparations for holding the Charleston Conference in-person as well as virtual. @chsconf @lisalibrarian

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Start-up Stories: Cassyni — The One-Stop-Shop for Online Seminars — Or, How to Get Your Product Built and Launched in 6 Months

Continuing a series looking at start-ups in the scholarly sector, from what they do and how it could be useful, to how they have got started, and tips they would share with other entrepreneurs. This time, an interview with Andrew Preston and Ben Kaube, two of the founders of online seminar platform Cassyni

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Revisiting: Is There a Business Case for Open Data?

Revisiting Tim Vines’ 2017 post — Open data continues to gain ground, but is there a revenue stream that would help journals recover the costs of gathering, reviewing and publishing data?

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Revisiting — The Google Generation Is Alright

How much has changed in a dozen years? Lettie Conrad looks back at Ann Michael’s post from the 2009 SSP Annual Meeting, “Publishing for the Google Generation”.

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Revisiting: Turning a Critical Eye on Reference Lists

In today’s post, Angela Cochran revisits her call to provide more editorial scrutiny to journal article references. Several new automated tools now available will help editors determine whether references are appropriate for including in scholarly works.

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Content at Scale – The Third Wave

Judy Luther looks back at the waves of change that have reshaped our industry. Looking ahead, the next big wave is to use analytics and AI as we complete the transition to open content.

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Guest Post – Starting a Novel Software Journal within the Existing Scholarly Publishing Ecosystem: Technical and Social Lessons

The Journal of Open Source Software was designed from scratch using the principles of open source and software design practices. This has both advantages and disadvantages, particularly with respect to elements of the traditional scholarly publishing ecosystem.

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