Chefs de Cuisine: Perspectives from Publishing’s Top Table — Mandy Hill

Robert Harington talks to Mandy Hill, Managing Director of Academic Publishing at Cambridge University Press in this new series of perspectives from some of publishing’s leaders across the non-profit and profit sectors of our industry.

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Guest Post – AI and Scholarly Publishing: A View from Three Experts

A recap of a recent SSP webinar on artificial intelligence (AI) and scholarly publishing. How can this set of technologies help or harm scholarly publishing, and what are some current trends? What are the risks of AI, and what should we look out for?

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Thoughts on AI’s Impact on Scholarly Communications? An Interview with ChatGPT

An interview with ChatGPT on issues related to scholarly communication.

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Fighting for the Digital Future of Books: 2022 in Review

“EFF client Internet Archive has created one of those spaces. Through Controlled Digital Lending (“CDL”), the Internet Archive and other nonprofit libraries make and lend digital scans of print books in their collections, at no cost to their patrons.  CDL allows people to check out digital copies of books for two weeks or less, and only permits patrons to check out as many copies as the Archive and its partner libraries physically own. That means that if the Archive and its partner libraries have only one copy of a book, then only one patron can borrow it at a time, just like any other library. Through CDL, the Internet Archive is helping to foster research and learning by helping its patrons access books and by keeping books in circulation when their publishers have lost interest in them….

If the publishers have their way, however, books, like an increasing amount of other copyrighted works, will only be rented, never owned, available subject to the publishers’ whim, on their terms. This is not a hypothetical problem, as students at Georgetown, George Washington University, and the other members of the Washington Research Library Consortium learned last fall when they discovered that found 1,379 books could no longer be borrowed in electronic form….”

Research Integrity and Reproducibility are Two Aspects of the Same Underlying Issue – A Report from STM Week 2022

Observations on reproducibility and research integrity from London STM Week

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Guest Post – How Do We Measure Success for Open Science?

Iain Hrynaszkiewicz discusses PLOS’s Open Science Indicators initiatives and shares initial results.

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Unnecessary Research Bureaucracy is Killing Academic Productivity, But it IS Fixable

Research bureaucracy and administrative burden has become so overpowering that many researchers are reporting that they don’t have time to do any research anymore. Phill Jones argues that technology in the form of PIDs will go a long way to fixing this.

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Innovation at eLife: An Interview with Damian Pattinson

eLife’s recent announcement that it will reinvent itself as a “service that reviews preprints” has generated much discussion over recent weeks. But what are the primary drivers and goals, and what might we all learn from this bold experiment?

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Does Scholarly Publishing Have an Innovation Problem?

Is there an entrenched stasis in scholarly communication in which the core elements of the system have not been much moved by the revolutions happening around us?

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The Beginning of the End of Publisher-Society Partner Contracts

Does the traditional society-publisher partnership contract make sense in an APC-fueled OA market? Angela Cochran reviews the new Wiley Partner Solutions offering and what that might mean for the future of contracts and guarantees.

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Revisiting: Will the Future of Scholarly Communication Be Pluralistic and Democratic, or Monocultural and Authoritarian?

Rick Anderson revisits a 2020 post: One way or another, the #scholcomm community is going to choose either a diversity of publishing models or a monoculture, because it can’t have both. How will this choice be made, and by whom?

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Revisiting — Return of the Big Brands: How Legacy Publishers Will Coopt Open Access

Revisiting a 2015 post that predicted the dominance of the cascade model of journal portfolio publishing and the increased dominance of the larger existing publishers in an open access market.

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Innovating the Science of Science: A report of the ICSSI meeting

A new conference explores ways research can turn the scientific method onto improving its own results.

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The Quest for Home: Transforming from Grant-funded Project to Sustainable Operation

Grant-funded initiatives eventually need a permanent home; here are some lessons learned from Educopia’s Katherine Skinner and Christina Drummond.

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Annual Reviews’ Subscribe To Open: From Idea To Full Adoption

Annual Reviews will offer their journals as Subscribe to Open. Come read our interview with Richard Gallagher, President and Editor-in-Chief.

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