The Bookseller – News – Emerald Publishing partners with Knowledge Unlatched for e-book collection

“Emerald Publishing has partnered with Knowledge Unlatched (KU) to create and promote an Open Access e-book collection in business management and economics. 

The exclusive deal starts from 2023 and is the first Open Access partnership of its kind for the publisher within its e-books portfolio.  

All book titles in the “Emerald Publishing – Responsible Management and the SDGs” package will also focus on responding to and achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with a particular focus on SDGs on decent work and economic growth; industry, innovation and infrastructure; and responsible consumption and production. 

Titles will cover themes such as diversity, inclusion and gender and racial equity in the workplace, sustainable tourism and ending forced labour, and how businesses of all sizes are working towards SDGs. …”

Diversity, sustainability and quality must be the hallmarks of academic publishing in Europe – The Guild

“Ahead of the June Competitiveness Council, where the ministers will be invited to adopt conclusions on research assessment and implementation of Open Science policies, The Guild urges the member states to ensure that Open Access serves science, not publishers.

While research excellence requires free flow of knowledge, some Open Access strategies and models increase the financial burden on research institutions. Article Processing Charges (APCs), used by some of the Open Access journals, exacerbate the unsustainable situation of journal spending in university libraries and create unequal access to knowledge. Greater transparency on the publication costs for Open Access journals, and fair and transparent contractual arrangements with publishers are crucial for monitoring the proper use of public research funding.

It is important to develop alternative and sustainable non-APC Open Access models. The Guild calls for the member states to support the development and uptake of Diamond Open Access journals and platforms which consist often of community-driven, and academic-led and owned publishing initiatives. Unlike other Open Access models, Diamond Open Access journals and platforms do not charge any fees from the authors or readers. Thus, they can further empower researchers to disseminate their research results, ensuring bibliodiversity and vital academic publishing….”

Diversity, sustainability and quality must be the hallmarks of academic publishing in Europe – The Guild

“Ahead of the June Competitiveness Council, where the ministers will be invited to adopt conclusions on research assessment and implementation of Open Science policies, The Guild urges the member states to ensure that Open Access serves science, not publishers.

While research excellence requires free flow of knowledge, some Open Access strategies and models increase the financial burden on research institutions. Article Processing Charges (APCs), used by some of the Open Access journals, exacerbate the unsustainable situation of journal spending in university libraries and create unequal access to knowledge. Greater transparency on the publication costs for Open Access journals, and fair and transparent contractual arrangements with publishers are crucial for monitoring the proper use of public research funding.

It is important to develop alternative and sustainable non-APC Open Access models. The Guild calls for the member states to support the development and uptake of Diamond Open Access journals and platforms which consist often of community-driven, and academic-led and owned publishing initiatives. Unlike other Open Access models, Diamond Open Access journals and platforms do not charge any fees from the authors or readers. Thus, they can further empower researchers to disseminate their research results, ensuring bibliodiversity and vital academic publishing….”

The Edge: Can Digital Courseware Promote Equity?

“It’s too soon to predict the impact of a four-year, $65-million project to develop low-cost digital courseware with the lofty goal of reducing disparities by race, ethnicity, and income in about 20 gateway courses. But several aspects of this effort by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation already seem worth highlighting, as do the questions they raise.

First, some background. The gateway-course project aims to fix a huge problem. Nationwide, about three million students a year enroll in gen-ed courses with “perniciously” persistent completion gaps for students who are Black, Hispanic, and low-income, according to a Gates primer. That costs those students time and money or derails their education altogether.

The foundation hopes this project can reverse the trends by introducing interactive, adaptive courseware built upon proven teaching practices like learn-by-doing assignments. “Really high-quality courseware can be a tool for equity,” Alison Pendergast, the senior program officer at Gates overseeing the project, put it to me when we spoke this week.

Some 18 partners are in on the effort, including digital and open-source publishing companies (Lumen Learning, Macmillan Learning, OpenStax), universities (Arizona State and Carnegie Mellon), and a host of research organizations (too plentiful to list here, but you can see them all at this link). The first two courses in the pipeline are introductory statistics and introductory chemistry. And the plan is for a range of research and faculty-development projects to expand the availability and awareness of high-quality courseware throughout higher ed (hence all the research partners).

At this early stage, three aspects of the project stand out to me. …”

Societal impact of university research in the written press: media attention in the context of SIUR and the open science agenda among social scientists in Flanders, Belgium | SpringerLink

Abstract:  Transferring scientific knowledge to non-academic audiences is an essential aspect of the open science agenda, which calls for scholars to pursue a popularization of their research. Accordingly, purposefully introducing scientific insights to the public at large is almost univocally deemed commendable. Indeed, in today’s models of research evaluation, the objects and activities considered are being extended beyond peer-reviewed journal articles to include non-scholarly popular communication. Although altmetrics offer one instrumental way to count some interactions with lay audiences, their reliance on social media makes them susceptible to manipulation, and mostly reflect circulation among niche audiences. In comparison, attention from non-scholarly media like newspapers and magazines seems a more relevant pathway to effectuate societal impact, due to its recognition in qualitative assessment tools and its broad, societal reach. Based on a case study of social scientists’ attention by newspapers and magazines in Flanders (northern Dutch-speaking region of Belgium) in 2019, this paper highlights that frequent participation in the public debate is reserved for high-status researchers only. Results show highly skewed media appearance patterns in both career position and gender, as eight male professors accounted for almost half of all 2019 media attention for social scientists. Because media attention is highly subject-dependent moreover, certain disciplines and fields offer easier pathways to popularization in media than others. Both the open science agenda and research assessment models value presence of researchers in popular media, adding written press attention to existing evaluation assessments however would disproportionately disadvantage early career researchers and exacerbate existing inequalities in academia.

 

 

Decolonising Open Educational Resources (OER): Why the focus on ‘open’ and ‘access’ is not enough for the EdTech revolution – EdTech Hub

“Open Educational Resources have offered a number of promises and opportunities, primarily in terms of customising learning to students’ needs, pace, and interests. Additionally, it has provided teachers with a wide range of customisation and collaboration options. On the flip side, there is a difference between thinking about new developments in an operational sense and in a social sense. Thinking of developments in education in a technological dimension relates to their operational sense and stops there. However, such developments acquire social and cultural meanings beyond mere function. We understand the latter by looking at what happens in practice as people, communities, cultures, and systems interact with and react to these developments. In effect, there are inherent assumptions within OER that several scholars have taken  a critical look at:

Education science is universal (it is not!) (King, 1999)
Learning outcomes are the benchmark (they are not!) (Fasheh, 1990)
‘Open’ is neutral and apolitical – and so is education data (they are not!)  (Watters, 2014) 
‘Open’ removes systemic barriers to access (not necessarily!) (Bali et al., 2018)
‘Open’ is inherently good or just (not necessarily!)  (Watters, 2014) …”

Guest Post: Open Access and the Direction Moving Forward – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Perhaps in recognition of this state of play, the BOIA Steering Committee used their recent 20th Anniversary Recommendations to help clarify the goal of open, stating that “OA is not an end in itself, but a means to other ends, above all,” the document continues, “to the equity, quality, usability, and sustainability of research.” …

After six years of thinking about scholarly communication, I’ve come to think about what needs to happen to improve this system in ways that I believe are compatible with the high-level summary recommendations of BOAI20. What I believe is that:

 

no author should be asked to pay
no reader should be unable to access the record
the idea of “excellence” should be incompatible with exclusivity, artificial scarcity, or any other device not pertaining directly to the soundness of a scholarly activity
authors should be rewarded for behavior such as making usable data available whenever appropriate, for engaging with flourishing modes of experiential reporting or communication, or for exhibiting a history of collegial peer feedback….”

Building Structural Equity and Inclusion in Open Scholarship

“The choices we make in the transition to open system infrastructures for producing and sharing knowledge will affect how equitable Open Science systems will be in the future. The recent inequities in global health outcomes and the global vaccine inequality are however the stark reality. Institutions can work towards building structural equity by adopting values based in humanities, examining the ways in which current solutions might repeat systemic oppression, and centering and empowering women and vulnerable populations during the solution/system creation process, not after. Open Science can contribute to the creation of equity only if it enables historically marginalized people to learn about and research topics that are important to them and their communities, have their research recognized and rewarded – not through proxies –, and translate this into impact for their communities. Proposals for increasing equity in Open Science include removing barriers to access and publication of scientific papers, lowering language barriers, openly sharing unique collections, centering the voices of the most vulnerable, and decolonizing knowledge. Open scholarship models and infrastructures in science and humanities education attuned to the SDGs implementations and UNESCO’s Recommendation on Open Science, can also substantially contribute towards equity. The UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science in particular is the long-awaited, landmark instrument-setting agreement that provides an initial framework. In a society that daily manifests the pathology of data misuse, that heightens barriers to accessing scientific output, and allows the overconcentration of data-aggregating powers at the hands of purely commercial platforms lacking the checks and balances of democratic, public institutions, there are steps that both institutions and researchers at their workbench need to take to ensure access to research production and dissemination is equitable, data collection more democratic and transparently participatory….”

Postdoc in Equitable Science Education | Department of Science Education, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhage

The Department of Science Education, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen calls for applications for a 3 year postdoc position beginning 1st of September 2022 or as soon as possible thereafter. 

The project GATE
The postdoc position will be part of the research project GATE (Gender Aware Teaching for Equity in Science and Engineering), funded by The Grundfos foundation. The project strives to understand why the majority of young women who in upper secondary have selected a science study program refrain from continuing into post-secondary science and engineering. Science teaching has been pointed out as a key medium for understanding the gendered in- and exclusions of young women and how these mechanisms set the scene for their higher education choices. GATE thus aim to understand the gendered in- and exclusions within the disciplins (content, teaching, participation) with a specific focus on physics A, chemistry A and technology A.

The postdoc will be responsible for an independent work package within GATE. Empirically a group of young women will be followed with longitudinal interviews throughout second and third year at Danish Upper secondary school (stx and htx). The cohort of young women who continues into the A-level subjects will be followed more intensively into their third year through an ethnographic approach. Classroom observations of teaching and focus-group interviews with a broader groups of students will be conducted to ensure an extensive focus. Focus will be on ‘celebrated identities’ in science settings, how they are performed and how they relate to young women and their experiences with science, their life in general and how their thoughts of the future develop throughout upper secondary.

GATE aims to contribute with results relevant for practice, national knowledge and international research. Theoretically, GATE aims to contribute with combining a close focus on selected science disciplines with research in equity and gender-studies. Based on the project results and international experts connected to GATE, a group of upper secondary school teachers will work closely with the senior researchers in the project on developing, testing, evaluating and implementing a Gender Aware Teaching for Equality-approach in their science teaching. More information on GATE can be requisitioned by writing to Henriette Holmegaard (hh@ind.ku.dk) or Lene Møller Madsen (lmmadsen@ind.ku.dk).

The role of the Postdoc 

Project management:

Attend and contribute actively to regular research group meetings both in GATE and in the research group SICS. Moreover, contribute to the department’s upper secondary school group.
Manage the contact with schools and coordination of empirical activities.
Support the GATE reference-group that entails key stakeholders.

Empirical work

Plan, conduct, and analyse qualitative data.

Publications, presentations

Disseminate results through key international journals in the research field, some in collaboration with the senior researchers in the project and some individually.
Present results at international conferences some in collaboration with the senior researchers in the project and some individually.
Participate at key national events with project-presentations and publish a few national papers.

Communication

Keep the GATE twitter account updated, contribute to a podcast.
Find ways of communicating research results nationally in collaboration with the GATE-project group.

Who are we looking for?

As the postdoc will conduct empirical work in Danish gymnasium, the candidate must speak a Scandinavian language and be willing to learn Danish within a short timeframe. However, everyday work-language at the department can be English.

We seek a candidate with experience in several of the qualifications below. However, we strongly encourage all candidates to apply also if they do not meet all of the below categories.

The ideal candidate:

Have substantial experiences with planning, conducting and analysing qualitative data in particular ethnographic studies.
Hold experiences with doing research at upper secondary-level or researching young people ideally where science education have played a significant role.
Holds a Ph.D.-degree within science education or in other disciplines e.g. anthropology, geography, pedagogy or sociology.
Have published papers in international peer reviewed journals.
Documented familiarity with the literature on gender and equity in science education.
Appreciate working in a research group where research is both jointly yet at the same time individual.
Are a good communicator and can present the project nationally as well as internationall

Diversity matters in digital scholarly technology – A conversation with Mark Hahnel

“Mark Hahnel is the CEO and founder of Figshare, which he created whilst completing his PhD in stem cell biology at Imperial College London. Figshare currently provides research data infrastructure for institutions, publishers and funders globally. He is passionate about open science and the potential it has to revolutionize the research community. For the last eight years, Mark has been leading the development of research data infrastructure, with the core aim of reusable and interoperable academic data. Mark sits on the board of DataCite and the advisory board for the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). He was on the judging panel for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Wellcome Trust Open Science prize and acted as an advisor for the Springer Nature master classes….”

New study explores how open educational resources transform teaching & learning | Achieving the Dream

“Open educational resources (OER) are freely available, open-source learning materials that can be downloaded, edited, and shared to serve all students. Using OER in higher education makes college courses not only more affordable for students, but more personalized, dynamic, and responsive to their lived experiences.

Based on promising findings from the multiyear OER Degree Initiative, ATD and SRI Education have conducted a study to examine whether the use of OER can transform teaching and learning and how open content can enable more equitable, culturally responsive teaching practices.

Teaching and Learning with Open Educational Resources presents the findings from this study. It is the first report of its kind to look extensively at how instructors are using OER to advance equity in the classroom….”

An open future for education : Maha Bali

“In Episode 3 we speak to Maha Bali. Maha Bali comes from a family of medical doctors but she fancied studying computer science. This was not to last however, as it didn’t gel with personality as an extrovert. She then made the happy option of becoming an educator. 

She is currently an Associate Professor of Practice at the Centre for Learning and Teaching at the American University in Cairo.

Maha’s love of interacting and connecting with people led her to co-found Virtually Connecting, a grassroots movement that challenges academic gatekeeping at conferences. She is also the co-facilitator of Equity Unbound, an equity-focused, open, connected intercultural learning curriculum….”

Teaching and Learning with Open Educational Resources (OER) | Achieving the Dream

“Based on promising findings from the multiyear Open Educational Resources (OER) Degree Initiative, ATD and SRI Education have conducted a study to examine whether the use of OER can transform teaching and learning and how open content can enable more equitable, culturally responsive teaching practices.

Teaching and Learning with Open Educational Resources is the first report of its kind, presenting findings from this study and examining how instructors are using OER to advance equity in the classroom….”