Open access—is it the way forward? | SpringerLink

“Notwithstanding the fact that the OA model was well intentioned, it has lately lost credibility, because of a meteoric rise of ill-credentialed publishers, often with mal-intent of amassing money, taking to the OA model of publishing. They either fake or go through a very cursory peer review, and the rigour of a diligent editorial over-sight is conspicuous by its absence. Moreover, there is no transparency even in the constitution of the editorial board, which is quite often populated with individuals with doubtful, and even dubious, credentials. Most of these, to use a rather pejorative term—‘Predatory journals’, solicit articles and authors fall prey to these constant solicitations, even at the cost of paying exorbitant fees, in their quest to be able to meet the requirements, and beat deadlines, for promotions or to justify their application for grants and fellowships. Both, the processing times and the rejection rates in these journals are extremely low, as business economics supersede the quality metrics of the journal. Larger the number of articles accepted, greater is the profit margin, and therefore it requires no great shakes of intelligence to realise that there are very few, if at all any, rejections from these ‘Predatory OA journals’. A lot of editors too want to go OA to improve upon the impact factor (IF) of their journal, which is dependent on the citations that the articles get. OA articles tend to get more citations, not always because of the quality, but more often due to the increased visibility, as compared to those articles which are published in scholarly subscription journals, but are hidden behind a pay wall….

No matter, what new models of publishing evolve, we need a greater transparency and regulation of publication of OA journals. ‘Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty’, says an age-old adage. Therefore, even authors should be eternally vigilant of the scope for dubious practices and must check the credibility of the journal before submitting their hard-earned and valuable scientific accomplishments. Though there is a DOAJ, most of us ignore to check the veracity of the journals before submitting our research manuscripts. It would thus behove us to be mindful of unethical practices around and guard against falling in the trap of getting published through money power, of affording prohibitively hefty publishing fees. It not only gets a bad press, but more importantly evokes and propagates a negative feeling of guilt and loss of self-esteem—indeed a heavy price, worth not affording for an ill-gotten publication!

To answer the conundrum we started with, Open access—is it the way forward, the jury is out. What say you?”

OA Policy at a Glance – UAlbany’s Draft Open Access (OA) Policy – LibGuides at University at Albany

“This policy aims to protect your rights so you can share your work openly. 

This policy does not require you to publish in specific journals or share your research against your wishes.

You do not transfer copyright with this policy. You grant the University a nonexclusive license.

There is a no-questions-asked waiver provision built into the policy’s language. 

With this policy, you will be able to 

Share, teach with, and distribute your work freely 
Broaden your scholarship’s reach, increase your scholarship’s impact
Support our institution’s commitment to publicly engaged research more fully
Encourage a more open, robust, equitable scholarly ecosystem…”

Editorial: About the possibility of Applied Vegetation Science going Gold Open Access – vegsciblog.org

“Some time ago, IAVS was put in front of quite an important decision. Two of our journals, the Journal of Vegetation Science and Applied Vegetation Science, are currently distributed under the hybrid open-access model, when readers pay, and authors publish for free (while allowing publishing also open access articles for an extra cost). However, Wiley, our publisher, asked us to transfer AVS into the Gold Open Access model (Gold OA) when readers read for free, but authors pay. Wiley argues that the transition into OA is a current trend in publishing and meets the demands of readers and funders. However, the unsaid truth also is that the publishing landscape is changing. Researchers started to use alternative (and often illegal) ways of getting paywalled papers, and the high cost of journal subscriptions lead many libraries and institutions to cancel it. This motivates publishers to transit more and more journals into the Gold OA model, which should secure their profit and in turn also the income of associations, dependent on money from journal publishing. The downside of the Gold OA model, which may not be so apparent to readers, but becomes painfully apparent to the authors, is the costly Article Processing Charge or Article Publication Charge (APC) needed to be paid upon acceptance of the paper for the publication (for AVS currently proposed at £1900 per article)….”

Editorial: About the possibility of Applied Vegetation Science going Gold Open Access – vegsciblog.org

“Some time ago, IAVS was put in front of quite an important decision. Two of our journals, the Journal of Vegetation Science and Applied Vegetation Science, are currently distributed under the hybrid open-access model, when readers pay, and authors publish for free (while allowing publishing also open access articles for an extra cost). However, Wiley, our publisher, asked us to transfer AVS into the Gold Open Access model (Gold OA) when readers read for free, but authors pay. Wiley argues that the transition into OA is a current trend in publishing and meets the demands of readers and funders. However, the unsaid truth also is that the publishing landscape is changing. Researchers started to use alternative (and often illegal) ways of getting paywalled papers, and the high cost of journal subscriptions lead many libraries and institutions to cancel it. This motivates publishers to transit more and more journals into the Gold OA model, which should secure their profit and in turn also the income of associations, dependent on money from journal publishing. The downside of the Gold OA model, which may not be so apparent to readers, but becomes painfully apparent to the authors, is the costly Article Processing Charge or Article Publication Charge (APC) needed to be paid upon acceptance of the paper for the publication (for AVS currently proposed at £1900 per article)….”

JVS/AVS Chief Editors’ opinion on Open Access – vegsciblog.org

“This Commentary is a part of the series asking the question: should Applied Vegetation Science, the journal owned by IAVS [International Association of Vegetation Science] and published by Wiley, become Gold Open Access? For the context and link to other Commentaries, please visit Editorial….

The mission of IAVS and its journals is to serve all the vegetation scientists globally. From this perspective, changing the journals to Open Access publication model presents a risk of exclusion of many colleagues who cannot afford to pay APCs. Therefore, we prefer to wait until the systems that would guarantee equal access to publication funds are implemented in most of the countries from which we regularly receive submissions. For the moment, we propose that both journals continue to be published under the current hybrid model, in which single articles can be published Open Access if the authors can and wish to pay….”

 

 

JVS/AVS Chief Editors’ opinion on Open Access – vegsciblog.org

“This Commentary is a part of the series asking the question: should Applied Vegetation Science, the journal owned by IAVS [International Association of Vegetation Science] and published by Wiley, become Gold Open Access? For the context and link to other Commentaries, please visit Editorial….

The mission of IAVS and its journals is to serve all the vegetation scientists globally. From this perspective, changing the journals to Open Access publication model presents a risk of exclusion of many colleagues who cannot afford to pay APCs. Therefore, we prefer to wait until the systems that would guarantee equal access to publication funds are implemented in most of the countries from which we regularly receive submissions. For the moment, we propose that both journals continue to be published under the current hybrid model, in which single articles can be published Open Access if the authors can and wish to pay….”

 

 

UF Author Rights Policy » Digital Partnerships & Strategies » UF Libraries » University of Florida

“What it is

A policy protecting faculty rights to share our scholarly research, specifically academic journal articles….

The policy lets you share your work widely by granting a nonexclusive license to the University. It is not a transfer of copyright, and you can opt out for any reason, no questions asked….”

UF Author Rights Policy » Digital Partnerships & Strategies » UF Libraries » University of Florida

“What it is

A policy protecting faculty rights to share our scholarly research, specifically academic journal articles….

The policy lets you share your work widely by granting a nonexclusive license to the University. It is not a transfer of copyright, and you can opt out for any reason, no questions asked….”

Proposal Establishing an Open Access Policy and Related Operations at Stanford

“C-LIB, the Faculty Senate Committee on Libraries, is pleased to be bringing forward a proposal to establish an Open Access policy at Stanford.  The proposal will come before the Faculty Senate at their session on November 19th.  In advance of that session, C-LIB will be hosting a discussion session via Zoom this Friday, October 30th at 2:00 PM. The registration link for the Zoom session is below. 

The full text of the proposal is available for all Stanford affiliates to review and comment via Google Docs:https://drive.google.com/file/d/12L0dsaINtYso_AYlwfe4ohvyIaKZWqfZ/view?usp=sharing …”