POSI fan tutte | Crossref

by Geoffrey Bilder

Just over a year ago, Crossref announced that our board had adopted the Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure (POSI).

It was a well-timed announcement, as 2021 yet again showed just how dangerous it is for us to assume that the infrastructure systems we depend on for scholarly research will not disappear altogether or adopt a radically different focus. We adopted POSI to ensure that Crossref would not meet the same fate.

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Blog – Europe PMC: Europe PMC adopts the Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure

“As a long-standing service and infrastructure provider in the open science ecosystem, Europe PMC supports the Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure (POSI). We welcome the momentum gathering behind this initiative to promote the need to support and sustain the open infrastructure.

Europe PMC has been a part of the public and open infrastructure for over 15 years and is run and managed by EMBL-EBI (which is part of the pan-European organisation of EMBL). It is funded by 34 international funders and is community-driven, open infrastructure, set in the context of key global open data resources such as the European Nucleotide Archive (INSDC), the wwPDB and the European Genome-Phenome Archive. All of these resources exist for the public good, led by scientific need and international collaborations, and have open governance structures and a commitment to long-term sustainability. Together with PMC USA, Europe PMC is a part of the PubMed Central International archive network, which plays an integral part in fulfilling shared goals to enable international open science. Europe PMC has been selected as an ELIXIR Core Data Resource, which means that it is of fundamental importance to the wider life-science community and the long-term preservation of biological data….”

Transparency | OurResearch

“We think that organizations working for Open should be sure that they’re being open themselves–with their code and data, and with the details of their operation. We’re doing our best to live up to that, and this page is part of that effort. If you’ve got feedback, drop us a line!

All monetary figures are in US dollars.”

DataCite’s Commitment to The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure

“DataCite was founded in 2009 on the principle of being an open stakeholder governed community that is open to participation from organizations around the world. Today, that continues to be true. Although our services have expanded, we continue to remain grounded to our roots. DataCite’s umbrella was formed with the aim to safeguard common standards worldwide to support research, thereby facilitating compliance with the rules of good scientific practice. DataCite’s identifier registration, Data File, and services are foundational components of the scholarly ecosystem. As the ecosystem continues to evolve, governance, sustainability and living-will insurance have become increasingly important components of the open infrastructure.

Recently several open scholarly infrastructure organizations and initiatives have adopted The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure. DataCite has conducted its own audit against the principles and would like to affirm our commitment to upholding these….”

Dryad’s Commitment to the Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure | Dryad news and views

“Researchers, institutions, funders, and publishers have relied on Dryad for over 10 years to support open data publishing. Throughout, we have taken our responsibility as open infrastructure seriously. As a small nonprofit working in a crowded and complicated scholarly communications landscape, it has been our honor to serve as an exemplar for what is possible when you remain committed to the mission and to building coalitions with like minded organizations in order to achieve success.  

Since our founding, members of our board and our team have been involved in constructing best practices for open infrastructure organizations like ours. One foundational set was published as the Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure. Since these principles were first published as a blog post in 2015, our team has worked closely with the original authors and additional collaborators to ensure Dryad aligns internal processes and external commitments to reflect these principles. …”

The Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure

Open source – All software required to run the infrastructure should be available under an open source license. This does not include other software that may be involved with running the organisation.
Open data (within constraints of privacy laws) – For an infrastructure to be forked it will be necessary to replicate all relevant data. The CC0 waiver is best practice in making data legally available. Privacy and data protection laws will limit the extent to which this is possible
Available data (within constraints of privacy laws) – It is not enough that the data be made “open” if there is not a practical way to actually obtain it. Underlying data should be made easily available via periodic data dumps.
Patent non-assertion – The organisation should commit to a patent non-assertion covenant. The organisation may obtain patents to protect its own operations, but not use them to prevent the community from replicating the infrastructure….”

Crossref’s Board votes to adopt the Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure | Crossref Blog

TL;DR

On November 11th 2020, the Crossref Board voted to adopt the “Principles of Open Scholarly Infrastructure” (POSI). POSI is a list of sixteen commitments that will now guide the board, staff, and Crossref’s development as an organisation into the future. It is an important public statement to make in Crossref’s twentieth anniversary year. Crossref has followed principles since its founding, and meets most of the POSI, but publicly committing to a codified and measurable set of principles is a big step. If 2019 was a reflective turning point, and mid-2020 was about Crossref committing to open scholarly infrastructure and collaboration, this is now announcing a very deliberate path. And we’re just a little bit giddy about it.