Library Futures | Controlled Digital Lending: Unlocking the Library’s Full Potential

“We are very excited today to announce the release of the Library Futures Foundation’s (LFF) new policy document “Controlled Digital Lending: Unlocking the Library’s Full Potential.” As outlined, controlled digital lending maximizes a library’s ability to loan works, thereby making the entire loaning system more efficient and equitable. 

Library Futures Foundation developed this document in consultation with the Intellectual Property and Information Policy (iPIP) Clinic at Georgetown Law. This concise policy document covers all the benefits, innovations, and goals that are the basis of any controlled digital lending system. It expands beyond the legal rationale laid out in the Controlled Digital Lending (CDL) White Paper by clarifying the core principles that are the foundations of a library’s mission to provide access to materials to serve the public good. …”

Controlled Digital Lending: Unlocking the Library’s Full Potential

“Controlled digital lending works exactly as the name implies: it is a controlled, digital form of the traditional library lending system. Under CDL, libraries generally lend digitized versions of print materials from their collections, strictly limiting them to a single digital copy per physical copy owned—a one-to-one “owned-to-loaned” ratio. If a library owns two physical copies of The Giving Tree, it only loans out two copies at any time, whether physically or digitally. This maintains the same limits as traditional book lending but enables access digitally. Digital access is especially important for those who live or work far from their closest library or whose work, childcare, or school schedules make physical access during business hours challenging. Communities rely on libraries to serve as a hub for education and knowledge. CDL (1) drives economic efficiency by maximizing returns on tax dollars, (2) expands reliable and equitable education, (3) promotes civil rights for marginalized communities, and (4) improves access through digitization. Congress should support their communities by empowering libraries to serve as a meaningful access point for these publicly funded collections by: ? Supporting legislation that codifies the practice of CDL by libraries.2 ? Encouraging funding through grant programs and other incentives to facilitate CDL. ? Promoting the development of a federal, centralized set of digital materials for use in CDL programs….”

Why CDL Now? Digital Libraries Past, Present & Future – Internet Archive Blogs

“Libraries have historically been trusted hubs to equalize access to credible information, a crucial role that they should continue to fill in the digital age. However, as more information is born-digital, digitized, or digital-first, libraries must build new policy, legal and public understandings about how advances in technology impact our preservation, community, and collection development practices.

This panel will bring together legal scholars Ariel Katz (University of Toronto) and Argyri Panezi (IE University Madrid/Stanford University) to discuss their work on library digital exhaustion and public service roles for digital libraries. They will be joined by Lisa Radha Weaver, Director of Collections and Program Development at Hamilton Public Library, who will discuss how library services have been transformed by digital delivery and innovation and Kyle Courtney of Library Futures/Harvard University, a lawyer/librarian who wrote the influential Statement on Controlled Digital Lending, signed by over 50 institutions. The panel will be moderated by Lila Bailey of Internet Archive….”

Why CDL Now? Digital Libraries Past, Present & Future

“Libraries have historically been trusted hubs to equalize access to credible information, a crucial role that they should continue to fill in the digital age. However, as more information is born-digital, digitized, or digital-first, libraries must build new policy, legal and public understandings about how advances in technology impact our preservation, community, and collection development practices.

This panel will bring together legal scholars Ariel Katz (University of Toronto) and Argyri Panezi (IE University Madrid/Stanford University) to discuss their work on library digital exhaustion and public service roles for digital libraries. They will be joined by Lisa Radha Weaver, Director of Collections and Program Development at Hamilton Public Library, who will discuss how library services have been transformed by digital delivery and innovation and Kyle Courtney of Library Futures/Harvard University, a lawyer/librarian who wrote the influential Statement on Controlled Digital Lending, signed by over 50 institutions. The panel will be moderated by Lila Bailey of Internet Archive.”

Implementation & Integration: CDL for All Libraries

“For the second event in a series about the innovative library practice of Controlled Digital Lending, we’ll hear from libraries, consortia, and librarians who are exploring CDL implementations at their institutions and communities with hands on learning around potential and existing solutions. Learn about building institutional CDL policies, user experience for patrons and staff, technological platforms, and how you can get involved with the CDL community. Bring your questions, ideas, and be prepared to dig in!”

IFLA — Sustaining libraries in a digital world: Interview with Jennie Rose Halperin, Library Futures

“Digital access, particularly in the public sector (libraries, schools, universities, hospitals and other publicly funded institutions), has been unsustainable for years. But the pandemic made it clear just how much libraries in particular are struggling to meet the needs of their patrons in an increasingly unequal information landscape.

Significant collections legally purchased or acquired by libraries are now inaccessible, unaffordable, or subject to unscrupulous licensing terms that make it impossible for libraries to purchase materials to lend and preserve.

Market dominance by a small band of publishers and distributors have led to outrageously high costs for digital resources, which libraries are forced to license rather than own like they would print resources.

Access to information is being withheld from people around the world in favor of private control of public resources….”

IFLA — Sustaining libraries in a digital world: Interview with Jennie Rose Halperin, Library Futures

“Digital access, particularly in the public sector (libraries, schools, universities, hospitals and other publicly funded institutions), has been unsustainable for years. But the pandemic made it clear just how much libraries in particular are struggling to meet the needs of their patrons in an increasingly unequal information landscape.

Significant collections legally purchased or acquired by libraries are now inaccessible, unaffordable, or subject to unscrupulous licensing terms that make it impossible for libraries to purchase materials to lend and preserve.

Market dominance by a small band of publishers and distributors have led to outrageously high costs for digital resources, which libraries are forced to license rather than own like they would print resources.

Access to information is being withheld from people around the world in favor of private control of public resources….”

Mythbusting Controlled Digital Lending

“Co-hosted by the Internet Archive and Library Futures, this webinar will address the most commonly repeated myths about controlled digital lending, countering misinformation and disinformation about the library practice now in use by hundreds of libraries. Attendees will hear from authors, librarians, copyright specialists, and policy experts as they respond to the common misconceptions about controlled digital lending.”

 

Mythbusting Controlled Digital Lending

“Co-hosted by the Internet Archive and Library Futures, this webinar will address the most commonly repeated myths about controlled digital lending, countering misinformation and disinformation about the library practice now in use by hundreds of libraries. Attendees will hear from authors, librarians, copyright specialists, and policy experts as they respond to the common misconceptions about controlled digital lending.”

 

Library Futures: New Nonprofit Launches to Support a Technology-Positive Future for Libraries – Internet Archive Blogs

“A coalition of advocacy and public interest groups has joined forces to launch the Library Futures Institute, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) committed to upholding the right of libraries to provide users with materials in the new digital environment. 

The new organization launched its website on January 25 and will work to empower libraries to fulfill their mission of providing equal and equitable access to culture for the public good. …”

Library Futures: New Nonprofit Launches to Support a Technology-Positive Future for Libraries – Internet Archive Blogs

“A coalition of advocacy and public interest groups has joined forces to launch the Library Futures Institute, a nonprofit 501(c)(3) committed to upholding the right of libraries to provide users with materials in the new digital environment. 

The new organization launched its website on January 25 and will work to empower libraries to fulfill their mission of providing equal and equitable access to culture for the public good. …”