UBC Library research project explores Indigenous perspectives in open education resource development – About UBC Library

“UBC librarians are embarking on a new collaborative research project that aims to address a fundamental problem in how open educational practices approach Indigenous Knowledges, and instead replicate colonial concepts of ownership and knowledge transfer.

The research project, titled Foregrounding Indigenous Perspectives: Community and Collaborator Affinities and Conflicts in Open Education, was recently awarded a grant by the Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL). The Practicing Librarian Grant, awarded by CARL’s Strengthening Capacity Committee, supports Canadian research in the field of academic librarianship for projects that use structured, evidence-based research to tackle real-world issues….”

White House Releases First-of-a-Kind Indigenous Knowledge Guidance for Federal Agencies | OSTP | The White House

“Today, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) jointly released new government-wide guidance  and an accompanying implementation memorandum for Federal Agencies on recognizing and including Indigenous Knowledge in Federal research, policy, and decision making. This announcement coincides with the Biden-Harris Administration’s 2022 Tribal Nations Summit and responds to a 2021 OSTP-CEQ memorandum that called for development of the guidance with Tribal consultation and Indigenous community engagement, as well as agency, expert, and public input.

Indigenous Knowledge is a body of observations, oral and written knowledge, innovations, practices, and beliefs developed by Tribes and Indigenous Peoples through interaction and experience with the environment. The Biden-Harris Administration has formally recognized Indigenous Knowledge as one of the many important bodies of knowledge that contributes to the scientific, technical, social, and economic advancements of the United States and our collective understanding of the natural world….”

Open Access Week 2022 | Open Access Australasia

“Open Access Australasia acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of country throughout Australia and their connections to land, sea and community. We pay our respect to their Elders past and present and extend that respect to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Open Access Australasia recognises the Awabakal, Turrbal and Yugara, and Bedegal as the First Nations owners of the lands where we work.

We also pay our respects to all indigenous peoples wherever they are in the world including ng? iwi, M?ori the tangata whenua of Aotearoa New Zealand.

This year’s Open Access week theme seeks to encourage connection and collaboration among the climate movement and the international open community. Sharing knowledge is a human right, and tackling the climate crisis requires the rapid exchange of knowledge across geographic, economic, and disciplinary boundaries.  Register for the events below and make sure to save our OA Week 2022 Zoom backgrounds to use for the events….”
 

Revisiting – Indigenous Knowledge and Research Infrastructure: An Interview with Katharina Ruckstuhl – The Scholarly Kitchen

“My research is founded in my Ng?i Tahu tribal community of K?ti Huirapa ki Puketeraki. We’re based in the east coast Otago region of the southern part of Aotearoa New Zealand. Our r?naka, or tribal council, has long-standing research relationships with many organizations, including the one I work for. So my research has over the years covered many diverse areas that are relevant to our people — M?ori language revitalization, mining and resource extraction, small business development, and now science and innovation. My interest in research infrastructure has evolved from studying science research innovation and the implications for M?ori. This is important from many perspectives — ethical, cultural, environmental, and economic….”

Canada to open one of the world’s largest library and archive facilities

“When it opens in 2026, ?dis?ke is expected to be one of the largest library and archive facilities in the world. 

With work now underway, the 216,000-square-foot, $326 million facility will house the Ottawa Public Library’s new central branch as well as Canada’s national library and archives. ?dis?ke will offer free and open access to millions of documents and Canada’s documentary heritage. It will be the first new building in the Parliamentary District in nearly 30 years. …”

Lakota elders helped a white man preserve their language. Then he tried to sell it back to them.

“ay Taken Alive had been fighting for this moment for two years: At his urging, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council was about to take the rare and severe step of banishing a nonprofit organization from the tribe’s land. 

The Lakota Language Consortium had promised to preserve the tribe’s native language and had spent years gathering recordings of elders, including Taken Alive’s grandmother, to create a new, standardized Lakota dictionary and textbooks. 

 

But when Taken Alive, 35, asked for copies, he was shocked to learn that the consortium, run by a white man, had copyrighted the language materials, which were based on generations of Lakota tradition. The traditional knowledge gathered from the tribe was now being sold back to it in the form of textbooks.  

“No matter how it was collected, where it was collected, when it was collected, our language belongs to us. Our stories belong to us. Our songs belong to us,” Taken Alive, who teaches Lakota to elementary school students, told the tribal council in April. …”

Digital Knowledge Sharing Workshop Keynote with Stephen Curley – YouTube

“The keynote event of the APS’s Library & Museum’s 4th annual Digital Knowledge Sharing workshop was hosted by the APS’s Center for Native American and Indigenous Research (CNAIR) and the Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI), supported by the Mellon Foundation.

This virtual keynote conversation event featured Stephen Curley, Director of Digital Archives for the National Native American Boarding Schools Healing Coalition, in conversation with Brian Carpenter, Curator of Indigenous Materials at the APS’s Library & Museum. The conversation covered topics such as processes for Tribal and non-Tribal archives to reach out to each other to foster ethical stewardship and curation of Indigenous archival materials, current efforts in the digital curation of Native American boarding school resources, the centrality of honoring and acknowledging relationships versus academic tendencies of individualistic work, and a look back and look forward at developments in the archives field surrounding ethical best practices in culturally responsive care and curation of Indigenous archival collections.”

Indigenous Knowledge and Research Infrastructure: An Interview with Katharina Ruckstuhl – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Indigenous knowledge, defined by UNESCO as “the understandings, skills and philosophies developed by societies with long histories of interaction with their natural surroundings”, is increasingly — if belatedly — being recognized as making a significant contribution to the research endeavor. However, it is poorly supported by the current research infrastructure, which was developed to serve the needs of the global North, especially in the sciences. Dr Katharina Ruckstuhl of the University of Otago, New Zealand, gave a powerful account of this in her recent NISO Plus keynote, Research Infrastructure for the Pluriverse, as well as sharing her thoughts on how we can can implement research infrastructure processes that support pluriversal approaches….”

Developing culturally appropriate food literacy resources for Aboriginal children with Foodbank WA’s Superhero Foods® – Tartaglia – – Health Promotion Journal of Australia – Wiley Online Library

On an Australian program to develop OER on aboriginal foods. 

“Key enablers to the success of the resource included: free online access, the highly engaging nature of the resources and adaptability to be implemented across a number of Aboriginal language groups in WA. Ensuring visual representation of healthy choices was fundamental to reinforcing nutrition messaging. Superhero Foods resources are a positive and important inclusion in the health promotion toolbox for Aboriginal children.”

Call for Contributions: Indigenous Knowledges and Open Education Book Project | Contributor Marketplace @ Rebus Community

The open education movement has provided a substantial improvement to the learning and research needs of students, faculty, and community members. This has been done through various barrier free methods of publishing, and mitigates any financial strains that can occur. However, within the open access movement there needs to be careful consideration for Indigenous Knowledges, which are deeply rooted in community defined ethics and protocols, that do not fit into ordinary academic contexts. Many conversations around open education (OE) focus on a Eurocentric framework of copyright and intellectual property rights that are sometimes in tension with Indigenous knowledge systems, and the goal of this volume is to centre Indigenous ways of knowing, culture, experiences, and worldviews within the work of open education pedagogy and advocacy work. The publication target date is summer 2023.

The following provides detailed steps for submitting a chapter proposal to this open access edited volume. We encourage chapters (of 4000 to 6000 words, excluding references) that are authored with diverse representation and scholarship (including student authors where possible), that reflect one of the following types of contributions:

Essay (theoretical or conceptual paper grounded in the literature)
Research paper (based on systematic exploration of a research question)
Case Study (critical, evidence-based, and theoretically grounded reflections on the intersections of Indigenous knowledges and open education)

CHAPTER PROPOSAL REQUIREMENTS

We ask that the chapter proposals be submitted by email to Donna Langille at donna.langille@ubc.ca, including the following elements by March 15, 2022 :

Working Title:
Abstract: Max 200 words
Type of Contribution: (research, theoretical/exploratory essay, case study)
Keywords: 3–6 keywords
Contributor information:

Required information for each contributor, in the correct authorship order and as you would like to see in print:

Full name
Institution name (in full, no abbreviations)
Primary e-mail address
Contributor bio (Max 100 words)

For more information, please visit Indigenous Knowledges and Open Education CFP.docx – Google Docs 13.

Citing Indigenous Elders and Knowledge Keepers | news.library.ualberta.ca

By Kelsey Kropiniski

One of the most common ways that we support students in their writing here at UAlberta Library is by offering citation advice. Citation questions come up frequently, and usually when they occur we direct students to the citation guides on our website. From there, we try to find the correct style and format to help students properly cite the source material they’re working with. Sometimes citation isn’t simple. As with most things that have strict rules and regulations, citation styles like APA, MLA, and Chicago can be highly exclusionary to different forms of information – especially when it comes to Indigenous oral teachings.

[…]

The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance: overview and Australian activities – Hanging Together

“The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance focus on appropriate use and reuse of Indigenous data. The principles recenter and reframe discussion and action on the sovereign rights and dignity of Indigenous Peoples, especially against the backdrop of “big data” and broad open access initiatives that are prevalent in today’s libraries and archives….

On February 2, 2021 representatives of the Global Indigenous Data Alliance (GIDA) and the Equity for Indigenous Research and Innovation Coordinating Hub (ENRICH) and representatives from National Library of Australia and University of Sydney joined attendees from Australian and New Zealand institutions for a discussion session hosted by National and State Libraries Australia (NSLA) and the OCLC Research Library Partnership. The panelists shared updates and examples of their work, as well as lessons they’ve learned. Many thanks to those who offered wisdom and expertise. This is a summary of what was shared in the session….”

The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance: overview and Australian activities – Hanging Together

“The CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Governance focus on appropriate use and reuse of Indigenous data. The principles recenter and reframe discussion and action on the sovereign rights and dignity of Indigenous Peoples, especially against the backdrop of “big data” and broad open access initiatives that are prevalent in today’s libraries and archives….

On February 2, 2021 representatives of the Global Indigenous Data Alliance (GIDA) and the Equity for Indigenous Research and Innovation Coordinating Hub (ENRICH) and representatives from National Library of Australia and University of Sydney joined attendees from Australian and New Zealand institutions for a discussion session hosted by National and State Libraries Australia (NSLA) and the OCLC Research Library Partnership. The panelists shared updates and examples of their work, as well as lessons they’ve learned. Many thanks to those who offered wisdom and expertise. This is a summary of what was shared in the session….”