Open Practices, Community-Based Research, and Social Responsibility | University of Oklahoma Libraries

“International Education Week is an annual opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide, and there is much the scholarly community can do to further these aims. Publishing open access is one way, but there is growing recognition of the need for more open, transparent practices across the research lifecycle.

Many use the term “open scholarship” or “open science” to encompass these practices across the applied sciences, natural and social sciences, and the humanities. The 2021 UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science is grounded in five “open” pillars: knowledge, infrastructures, communication, engagement of societal actors, and dialogue with other knowledge systems. These open practices are essential to community-based, socially-responsive research.

We invite you to join us for this virtual panel discussion featuring three leaders in the global advancement of open research practices, who co-authored the 2020 Canadian Commission for UNESCO brief “Open Science Beyond Open Access: For and with Communities, a Step Towards the Decolonization of Knowledge.” The panel discussion will be followed by a question and answer period….”

Open Practices, Community-Based Research, and Social Responsibility | University of Oklahoma Libraries

“International Education Week is an annual opportunity to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide, and there is much the scholarly community can do to further these aims. Publishing open access is one way, but there is growing recognition of the need for more open, transparent practices across the research lifecycle.

Many use the term “open scholarship” or “open science” to encompass these practices across the applied sciences, natural and social sciences, and the humanities. The 2021 UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science is grounded in five “open” pillars: knowledge, infrastructures, communication, engagement of societal actors, and dialogue with other knowledge systems. These open practices are essential to community-based, socially-responsive research.

We invite you to join us for this virtual panel discussion featuring three leaders in the global advancement of open research practices, who co-authored the 2020 Canadian Commission for UNESCO brief “Open Science Beyond Open Access: For and with Communities, a Step Towards the Decolonization of Knowledge.” The panel discussion will be followed by a question and answer period….”

What LPC accomplished under our first strategic plan | Library Publishing Coalition

by Melanie Schlosser

LPC’s current 5-year strategic plan (PDF) is winding down. Published in summer 2018, it was our young community’s first concrete statement of our strategic goals. From LPC’s seed-funded project period (2013-14) through our first two years as a full-fledged membership association (2015-2017), we relied for guidance on our original scoping materials and focused much of our energy on getting the community’s infrastructure and ongoing programs on solid footing. By 2017, it had become apparent that we were ready to think more strategically about the future and put in the work to make sure we were pulling in the same directions across the community. The strategic planning process we undertook was a traditional one, involving a SWOT Analysis, an environmental scan, and community consultation. The outcome was a traditional 5-year strategic plan consisting of three goals, with nested objectives and action items.

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Now we’ve heard it all! (No, not really ;) ) Engaging the community in shaping OA policy for books | UKSG22 Conference video recordings

The Open Access Books Network (OABN) is a relatively new kid on the block, but it punches above its weight. Our most significant series so far was the Voices from the OA Books Community, devoted to exploring different aspects of policy for OA books.

During the heated discussions, what were the main areas of consensus and which topics emerged as especially controversial? Which aspects of OA policy for books perplexed the community and provoked more questions than answers? In this session we will hear from session leaders and participants as they paint a nuanced picture of a necessary but complex endeavour: how to directly engage the OA books community in developing policies that will materially affect its future.

 

Job: Technical Community Program Manager at Wikimedia Foundation | Sept 2022

“The Wikimedia Foundation is looking for a Technical Community Program Manager to join our team, reporting to the Manager of Developer Advocacy in the Technology department.  As the Technical Community Program Manager, you will be part of a multifunctional team supporting our global communities of Free and Open Source developers. You will work closely with our technical community and staff, and help run programs, events and initiatives to foster technical community and capacity building and a fun, inclusive and productive environment.  You’ll work remotely with a full-time distributed team, and need to overlap (UTC-4 to UTC+2) working hours. We are looking for someone who is comfortable working and communicating in a highly collaborative, open environment; is passionate about connecting people; and eager to develop a broad understanding of Wikimedia’s diverse technical communities, technical areas, and ways to contribute….”

Data Communities: Datenmanagement jenseits von generischen und fachspezifischen Perspektiven | Bausteine Forschungsdatenmanagement

Asef, Esther Marie, Elisabeth Huber, Sabine Imeri, Eva Ommert, Michaela Rizzolli, und Cosima Wagner. 2022. „Data Communities: Datenmanagement Jenseits Von Generischen Und Fachspezifischen Perspektiven: Erkenntnisse Aus Einem Workshop Im Rahmen Der FORGE 2021“. Bausteine Forschungsdatenmanagement, Nr. 2 (August). German:1-12. https://doi.org/10.17192/bfdm.2022.2.8434.

Die Frage, inwieweit Datenmanagement jenseits von entweder generischen oder fachspezifischen Perspektiven denkbar ist, stand im Mittelpunkt eines Workshops im Rahmen der FORGE 2021. Im Workshop wurde das Konzept der „Data Communities“ (Cooper und Springer 2019) vorgestellt, seine Potenziale mit Blick auf die Sozial- und Geisteswissenschaften diskutiert und anschließend eruiert, welche strategischen wie operativen Kriterien sich daraus für forschungsadäquat unterstützende Datenmanagement-Services ableiten lassen. Der Beitrag fasst die wichtigsten Erkenntnisse aus dem Workshop zusammen und diskutiert, wie das bestehende Konzept um spezifisch sozial- und geisteswissenschaftliche Aspekte erweitert werden könnte.

User Satisfaction Survey | PubPub

We’d like to understand who our users are, how they value PubPub, and and how we can better service publishing communities. If you can, please fill out the following survey. It should take less than 5 minutes to complete, and can be filled out anonymously, or you can leave your email address if you’d like us to follow up with you. Your individual survey responses will not be shared with anyone outside of Knowledge Futures, Inc. We may use non-personalized, aggregated survey data to publish public reports about our users and communities.

About Community Spotlights | PubPub Help

From January 1 to December 31, 2019, 615 new Communities were created on PubPub. The previous fall, in October 2018, we had made a pivotal change: we launched a public “Create your Community” button, enabling anyone at all to create a publishing space on the platform. The positive trend line of growth—and the Community experimentation and feedback that followed—is now what drives our roadmap, Community Services, and endless learning. Across 2020 and 2021, 2,601 additional new Communities joined PubPub. This June, someone out there created our 4,000th Community.

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Accelerating Social Impact Research: Libraries at the Intersection of Openness and Community-Engaged Scholarship

“The social impact of research, whether it is examining educational and economic disparities, developing new medications, or understanding environmental challenges, is a developing, but key, component of higher education and research institutions. Critical to accelerating this impact and advancing public good is the broad adoption of open research principles and practices, which have been shown to benefit the individual researcher through increased citations and scholarly impact, to spur scientific advancements, and to provide more equitable access to research and a deep commitment and engagement with the local community or the communities that are engaged in or using the research. As educators and stewards of the scholarly and scientific record, research libraries have a significant interest in accelerating open research and scholarship within their institutions, and are ideally situated to support the institutional mission to serve the public and their communities. Within higher education, research library leaders have a unique position on campus, supporting every discipline with services, expertise, collections, and infrastructure. To move forward together, ARL piloted a six-month cohort program for members to accelerate the adoption and implementation of open science principles at the intersection of social impact of research and scholarship….”

U.S. Library Outreach Workshop, Open Book Collective | Community-led Open Publication Infrastructures for Monographs (COPIM)

by Livy Onalee Snyder and Eileen A. Fradenburg Joy

As a community-led organization, the Open Book Collective regularly solicits advice and counsel for its development from the communities it seeks to serve. As university librarians are critical to the financial and other forms of support for open access and open source initiatives (such as publishers and infrastructure providers), they have been involved from the beginning of the OBC, from initial brainstorming to the processes of forming the collective — its values and principles, membership, governance, business model, web platform, and so on. Now that we are nearing the launch of the OBC, we are conducting a new series of workshops with librarians in order to get some further assessments from them regarding what we have built. It should be noted, first, that not only will the OBC always be seeking guidance from libraries as it launches and moves forward, but that librarians will have a major role to play in the governance of the collective as well-meaning, librarians are not just our consultants; they are building the collective with us.

In our most recent workshops, we have been asking librarians for their thoughts and advice on the criteria for membership within the OBC, its governance model, its offerings and business model, its community standards, its technical aspects, its web platform, or any other aspect of the OBC they want to discuss that we haven’t thought of in advance.

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Webinar: Normalizing Open Research practices via grassroots community-building – OASPA | June 29, 2022

“OASPA is pleased to announce our next webinar which will focus on the ways in which researchers and scholars are normalizing Open Research practices via grassroots community-building. We will hear from four speakers from different regions who will relate what has worked in their specific communities, quick wins and slow wins, and what they recommend for other members of the community (whether other researchers, or publishers and librarians).”

‘Replacing Academic Journals’ | Jeff Pooley

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There’s lots to unpack in the Brembsian alternative proposed here. One cornerstone is the adoption of open standards that—as best I understand it—would enable university repositories and nonprofit, community-led platforms like Open Library of Humanities (OLH) to form a kind of global, interoperable library. A second cornerstone is a regulated market for services. In an open procurement process, publishers and other firms—nonprofit or otherwise—would submit bids for peer review services, for example, or for copy editing or even writing software. The idea is that a regulated marketplace will, through competition enabled by open standards, discipline the overall system’s cost.

It’s a fascinating proposal, one that—as the paper notes—could be implemented with existing technologies. The problem is the lever of change. The incumbent publishers’ entrenched position, Brembs et al explain, renders a first move by libraries or scholars impractical. That leaves funders, whose updated rules and review criteria could, the paper argues, tip the incentive structure in the direction of an open, journal-free alternative.

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