Why PID Strategies Are Having A Moment — And Why You Should Care

Why are national PID strategies having a moment, and why should you care? Find out in today’s post by Alice Meadows.

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Guest Post — Publishers Should Be Transparent About the Capabilities and Limitations of Software They Use to Detect Image Manipulation or Duplication

The STM Integrity Hub will include software to detect image manipulation and duplication. It is important that the effectiveness of the software be evaluated in a transparent process.

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Research Integrity and Reproducibility are Two Aspects of the Same Underlying Issue – A Report from STM Week 2022

Observations on reproducibility and research integrity from London STM Week

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Guest Post – How Do We Measure Success for Open Science?

Iain Hrynaszkiewicz discusses PLOS’s Open Science Indicators initiatives and shares initial results.

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Unnecessary Research Bureaucracy is Killing Academic Productivity, But it IS Fixable

Research bureaucracy and administrative burden has become so overpowering that many researchers are reporting that they don’t have time to do any research anymore. Phill Jones argues that technology in the form of PIDs will go a long way to fixing this.

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Smorgasbord: Twitter v. Mastodon; Incentivizing Open Science; DEI v. Involution

Another “mixed bag” post from us — Is it time to leave Twitter? How can we incentivize journals and authors to take up open science practices? What is “involution” and is DEIA the solution?

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Adieu to Educopia: An Interview with Katherine Skinner

Read about the history of Educopia and look ahead to its future in today’s interview with co-founder Katherine Skinner, who recently stepped down as their Executive Director

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The Beginning of the End of Publisher-Society Partner Contracts

Does the traditional society-publisher partnership contract make sense in an APC-fueled OA market? Angela Cochran reviews the new Wiley Partner Solutions offering and what that might mean for the future of contracts and guarantees.

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Thoughts and Observations on the OSTP Responses to Our Interview Questions

Karin Wulf and Rick Anderson reflect on the OSTP’s response to their interview questions, and on some implications of those responses and of the memo itself.

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Revisiting — Indigenous Knowledge and Research Infrastructure: An Interview with Katharina Ruckstuhl

On Indigenous Peoples’ Day we revisit an interview with Dr. Katharina Ruckstuhl, on how we can ensure that our research infrastructure supports and respects Indigenous knowledge and knowledge management.

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Smorgasbord: A Better Metaphor for Publishing, Twitter/Musk, Equitable Access, and Those Vexing OACA Experimental Controls

A new type of post from us today, offering a smorgasbord of opinions on topics including the ongoing Twitter/Elon Musk saga, just what “equitable access” to the literature means, the ongoing lack of experimental controls in one area of bibliometric analysis, and whether journals are more like a gate or a sewer.

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