Climate Action: Are We Committed Enough?

On the occasion of the 27th Conference of the Parties (COP27) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Haseeb Md. Irfanullah explores scholarly publishers’ role in tackling climate crisis.

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Smorgasbord: Twitter v. Mastodon; Incentivizing Open Science; DEI v. Involution

Another “mixed bag” post from us — Is it time to leave Twitter? How can we incentivize journals and authors to take up open science practices? What is “involution” and is DEIA the solution?

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Guest Post – Wikipedia’s Citations Are Influencing Scholars and Publishers

Rachel Helps, the Wikipedian-in-residence at the BYU libraries discusses the intersection of scholarly journals and Wikipedia.

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Thoughts and Observations on the OSTP Responses to Our Interview Questions

Karin Wulf and Rick Anderson reflect on the OSTP’s response to their interview questions, and on some implications of those responses and of the memo itself.

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Revisiting: Humanities Research Infrastructure is Great ROI

What brings humanities infrastructure together — whether materials-based (content) or process-based (projects) or tools-based (platforms and laboratories) — is an iterative process of knowledge creation. Revisiting a post from 2020.

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Revisiting: Will the Future of Scholarly Communication Be Pluralistic and Democratic, or Monocultural and Authoritarian?

Rick Anderson revisits a 2020 post: One way or another, the #scholcomm community is going to choose either a diversity of publishing models or a monoculture, because it can’t have both. How will this choice be made, and by whom?

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It’s Good to be Back… But What Happens Now?

Reflections on what’s next for getting together in the real world, in a time of climate change and pandemics.

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10 Years of Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research: An Interview with the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable (Part 2)

An interview with principals of the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable, whose work significantly shaped the Holdren Memo on public access to federally-funded research.

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10 Years of Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research: An Interview with the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable (Part 1)

An interview with principals of the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable, whose work significantly shaped the Holdren Memo on public access to federally-funded research.

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Ask the Community: Why Do You Volunteer?

As the long-awaited, in-person SSP Annual Meeting approaches, we are hosting two events where prospective volunteers can learn about opportunities within the Society. We asked members of the community to share: which organization(s) do you volunteer for and why? 

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