Guest Post — The UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and Open Access: Gerald Beasley Interviews Timon Oefelein (Part 2 of 2)

In Part 2 of this pair of posts we turn the tables and Gerald Beasley interviews Timon Oefelein of Springer Nature about how publishers can support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.

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Guest Post — The UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and Open Access: Timon Oefelein Interviews Gerald Beasley (Part 1 of 2)

In Part 1 of this pair of posts, Timon Oefelein interviews Gerald R. Beasley, the Carl A. Kroch University Librarian at Cornell University, about how librarians can support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.

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Guest Post — Fifty Shades of Hybrid Conferences: Why Publishers Should Care (and How You Can Help)

Since in-person events are likely not going away, and neither are virtual ones, conference organizers are left with the most complex of options: hybrid. How can scholarly publishers help?

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The dawn of the age of duplicate peer review

Simultaneously submitting an article to multiple journals is considered an ethical violation. But the growth of preprints means that many articles are undergoing simultaneous yet parallel peer review processes. Will duplicate peer review become the norm?

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Revisiting: Theory of the E-book

Joe Esposito revisits his 2012 post on the unstated theory of the e-book, which assumes that a book consists only of its text and can be manipulated without regard to the nature and circumstances of its creation. This is only one theory of many, but it is now the prevailing one.

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The North is Drawing the South Closer, But, This is Not the Whole Picture of Geographical Inclusion

Geographical inclusion in scholarly publishing needs to do more than just drawing the Global South closer to the Global North.

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Revisiting: Is There a Business Case for Open Data?

Revisiting Tim Vines’ 2017 post — Open data continues to gain ground, but is there a revenue stream that would help journals recover the costs of gathering, reviewing and publishing data?

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Guest Post — Enabling your Organization to be Antiracist

To celebrate the launch of C4DISC’s Antiracism Toolkit for Organizations, Damita Snow and Jocelyn Dawson sat down with Laura Martin and Megan Seyler to share why they are excited about this toolkit and what they hope it will achieve.

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Revisiting — The Tyranny of Unintended Consequences: Richard Poynder on Open Access and the Open Access Movement

Looking back at Richard Poynder’s in-depth analysis of the state of open access. What’s changed since then?

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Guest Post — One Publisher to Rule Them All? Consolidation Trends in the Scholarly Communications and Research Sectors

Jon Treadway and Sarah Greaves look at the consolidation of the scholarly communications market and where it is leading.

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Revisiting — The Google Generation Is Alright

How much has changed in a dozen years? Lettie Conrad looks back at Ann Michael’s post from the 2009 SSP Annual Meeting, “Publishing for the Google Generation”.

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Pluralism vs. Monoculture in Scholarly Communication, Part 2

Calls for a monoculture of scholarly communication keep multiplying. But wouldn’t a continued diversity of models be healthier?

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Preprints Are Not Going to Replace Journals

At a recent meeting, a debate was held on the motion: Preprints are going to replace journals. I was asked to oppose the motion and this post is based on my arguments.

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