Life in a Liminal Space; Or, The Journey Shapes the Destination

A liminal space is the time between the ‘what was’ and the ‘next’. It is a period of transition, uncertainty, and multiple paths forward. The first wave of an open access transition is upon us, driven by the APC model, moving us to favor quantity over quality, and resulting in massive consolidation in many areas of the market. What comes next?

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Revisiting — Journalism, Preprint Servers, and the Truth: Allocating Accountability

In light of the recent anniversary of the January 6th attack on the US Capitol, we revisit Rick Anderson’s post on how journalists flag unsupported claims and blatant falsehoods, and whether preprint platforms should do the same.

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Guest Post – Perspectives on a “Unified Approach” to the Future of Open Access  

There is value in exploring the concept of different perspectives on open access in order to begin to develop a “unified approach to open”.

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Make Way for the Metaverse

This is where innovation happens, not among the gods on Mount Olympus but in small, tangible ways where people go about their lives and try to improve them a little bit at a time. We all work together, unknowingly, making things better, faster, cheaper.

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Our Societies, Journals, and the Narrative of Accessibility and Equity in Open Research

What can research societies do to improve accessibility and equity in Open Research? Haseeb Irfanullah suggests ways we can transform our outlook and efforts.

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Guest Post — Pandemic Disruptor: Canadian Perspectives on how COVID-19 is Changing Open Access in Canada (Part 2)

Part 2 of this series looking at open access developments in Canada examines the changing processes and infrastructure needs for open science.

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Guest Post — Pandemic Disruptor: Canadian Perspectives on how COVID-19 is Changing Open Access (Part 1)

A look at open access policies and developments in Canada, especially in light of the Covid-19 pandemic. Part 1 of a 2 part post.

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Guest Post — The UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and Open Access: Gerald Beasley Interviews Timon Oefelein (Part 2 of 2)

In Part 2 of this pair of posts we turn the tables and Gerald Beasley interviews Timon Oefelein of Springer Nature about how publishers can support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.

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Guest Post — The UN’s Sustainable Development Goals and Open Access: Timon Oefelein Interviews Gerald Beasley (Part 1 of 2)

In Part 1 of this pair of posts, Timon Oefelein interviews Gerald R. Beasley, the Carl A. Kroch University Librarian at Cornell University, about how librarians can support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals.

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Guest Post — Fifty Shades of Hybrid Conferences: Why Publishers Should Care (and How You Can Help)

Since in-person events are likely not going away, and neither are virtual ones, conference organizers are left with the most complex of options: hybrid. How can scholarly publishers help?

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The dawn of the age of duplicate peer review

Simultaneously submitting an article to multiple journals is considered an ethical violation. But the growth of preprints means that many articles are undergoing simultaneous yet parallel peer review processes. Will duplicate peer review become the norm?

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Revisiting: Theory of the E-book

Joe Esposito revisits his 2012 post on the unstated theory of the e-book, which assumes that a book consists only of its text and can be manipulated without regard to the nature and circumstances of its creation. This is only one theory of many, but it is now the prevailing one.

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The North is Drawing the South Closer, But, This is Not the Whole Picture of Geographical Inclusion

Geographical inclusion in scholarly publishing needs to do more than just drawing the Global South closer to the Global North.

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