Guest Post – AI and Scholarly Publishing: A View from Three Experts

A recap of a recent SSP webinar on artificial intelligence (AI) and scholarly publishing. How can this set of technologies help or harm scholarly publishing, and what are some current trends? What are the risks of AI, and what should we look out for?

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Guest Post — Publishers Should Be Transparent About the Capabilities and Limitations of Software They Use to Detect Image Manipulation or Duplication

The STM Integrity Hub will include software to detect image manipulation and duplication. It is important that the effectiveness of the software be evaluated in a transparent process.

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Editors can’t spot talent. I’ve heard this joke before. It isn’t funny

Editors at The BMJ are lousy at predicting the citation performance of research papers. Or are they?

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Research Integrity and Reproducibility are Two Aspects of the Same Underlying Issue – A Report from STM Week 2022

Observations on reproducibility and research integrity from London STM Week

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It Isn’t Fake Science, Because It Isn’t Science at All. It’s Dupery.

What if even by saying “fake science” you inadvertently participate in a scam? What if this phrase legitimizes fraud, lies, and deceit?  Let’s call it what it is – dupery.

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Thoughts and Observations on the OSTP Responses to Our Interview Questions

Karin Wulf and Rick Anderson reflect on the OSTP’s response to their interview questions, and on some implications of those responses and of the memo itself.

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New Light on the New OSTP Memo: An Interview with Dr. Alondra Nelson

Karin Wulf and Rick Anderson interview Dr. Alondra Nelson, acting director of the White House Office on Science & Technology Policy when the new OSTP memo was published.

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Smorgasbord: A Better Metaphor for Publishing, Twitter/Musk, Equitable Access, and Those Vexing OACA Experimental Controls

A new type of post from us today, offering a smorgasbord of opinions on topics including the ongoing Twitter/Elon Musk saga, just what “equitable access” to the literature means, the ongoing lack of experimental controls in one area of bibliometric analysis, and whether journals are more like a gate or a sewer.

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The New OSTP Memo: A Roundup of Reactions and an Interview Preview

Karin Wulf and Rick Anderson provide a roundup of responses to the new OSTP public access memo — and a preview of their interview with OSTP leadership.

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Does Trust in Research Begin with Trust in Peer Review?

Kicking off Peer Review Week 2022: Does trust in research begin with trust in peer review across the whole ecosystem, and what does that look like for different communities and stakeholders?

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Ask an Editor-in-Chief/Surgeon/Researcher/Author/Reviewer: Is Research Integrity Possible without Peer Review?

One more answer to the question, Is Research Integrity Possible without Peer Review? Today’s response is from journal Editor-in-Chief and surgeon, D. Robert Siemens.

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Still Ambiguous at Best? Revisiting “If We Don’t Know What Citations Mean, What Does it Mean When We Count Them”

If we don’t know what citations mean, what does it mean when we count them? Revisiting a 2015 (!) post in light of recent developments in citation metrics and impact.

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Guest Post — Has Peer Review Created a Toxic Culture in Academia? Moving from ‘Battering’ to ‘Bettering’ in the Review of Academic Research

Avi Staiman suggests revamping the peer review process to make it less about tearing down the work of others, and more about helping authors improve their papers.

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Revisiting: Will the Future of Scholarly Communication Be Pluralistic and Democratic, or Monocultural and Authoritarian?

Rick Anderson revisits a 2020 post: One way or another, the #scholcomm community is going to choose either a diversity of publishing models or a monoculture, because it can’t have both. How will this choice be made, and by whom?

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