Does Trust in Research Begin with Trust in Peer Review?

Kicking off Peer Review Week 2022: Does trust in research begin with trust in peer review across the whole ecosystem, and what does that look like for different communities and stakeholders?

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Ask an Editor-in-Chief/Surgeon/Researcher/Author/Reviewer: Is Research Integrity Possible without Peer Review?

One more answer to the question, Is Research Integrity Possible without Peer Review? Today’s response is from journal Editor-in-Chief and surgeon, D. Robert Siemens.

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Still Ambiguous at Best? Revisiting “If We Don’t Know What Citations Mean, What Does it Mean When We Count Them”

If we don’t know what citations mean, what does it mean when we count them? Revisiting a 2015 (!) post in light of recent developments in citation metrics and impact.

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Guest Post — Has Peer Review Created a Toxic Culture in Academia? Moving from ‘Battering’ to ‘Bettering’ in the Review of Academic Research

Avi Staiman suggests revamping the peer review process to make it less about tearing down the work of others, and more about helping authors improve their papers.

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Revisiting: Will the Future of Scholarly Communication Be Pluralistic and Democratic, or Monocultural and Authoritarian?

Rick Anderson revisits a 2020 post: One way or another, the #scholcomm community is going to choose either a diversity of publishing models or a monoculture, because it can’t have both. How will this choice be made, and by whom?

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Fill in the Blank Leads to More Citations

When a reputable journal refuses to get involved with a questionable paper, science looks less like a self-correcting enterprise and more like a way to amass media attention.

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Building Stronger Chains Together: Keeping Preprints Connected to the Scholarly Record

In the global supply chain of scholarly communications, we share a responsibility for accurate metadata that represents the publication lifecycle — from preprint to version of record, and everything in between.

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Q: Can You Revoke a Creative Commons License? A: No. Er… Sort Of? Maybe?

A Creative Commons license is irrevocable; it says so right in the license. But it also says you can change your mind and distribute the work differently, or not at all. What does this mean?

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A New Twist on a Publishing Scam: Ghost-authoring Book Reviews for Fun and Profit

In a new twist on academic fraud, a company now offers to pay you to write and publish book reviews that will be credited to someone else.

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Guest Post – Cybersecurity and Academic Libraries: Findings from a Recent Survey

Susie Winter reviews recent data on cybersecurity for academic libraries, as well as a survey of awareness and attitudes toward best practices among librarians.

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Revisiting: A Parable of Innovation in Publishing — A Mostly True Story

Joe Esposito looks back at a 2011 post offering a parable of the role in innovation in publishing and makes the case that we should not criticize companies that try and fail to do new things.

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Revisiting: Why Aren’t There More Women at the Top in Scholarly Publishing?

Alice Meadows revisits a post from 2013 that looked at how the scholarly publishing field fares in terms of the number of women in leadership roles. Nine years later, has anything changed?

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