Speculation on the Most Likely OSTP Nelson Memo Implementation Scenario and the Resulting Publisher Strategies

What is the most likely scenario for implementation of the OSTP’s Nelson Memo? And what strategies will that offer for publishers?

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It Isn’t Fake Science, Because It Isn’t Science at All. It’s Dupery.

What if even by saying “fake science” you inadvertently participate in a scam? What if this phrase legitimizes fraud, lies, and deceit?  Let’s call it what it is – dupery.

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Thoughts and Observations on the OSTP Responses to Our Interview Questions

Karin Wulf and Rick Anderson reflect on the OSTP’s response to their interview questions, and on some implications of those responses and of the memo itself.

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New Light on the New OSTP Memo: An Interview with Dr. Alondra Nelson

Karin Wulf and Rick Anderson interview Dr. Alondra Nelson, acting director of the White House Office on Science & Technology Policy when the new OSTP memo was published.

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Smorgasbord: A Better Metaphor for Publishing, Twitter/Musk, Equitable Access, and Those Vexing OACA Experimental Controls

A new type of post from us today, offering a smorgasbord of opinions on topics including the ongoing Twitter/Elon Musk saga, just what “equitable access” to the literature means, the ongoing lack of experimental controls in one area of bibliometric analysis, and whether journals are more like a gate or a sewer.

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Equity, Inclusiveness, and Zero Embargo Public Access

Robert Harington considers whether open and public access models, as they have emerged so far, are delivering us to a more inequitable publishing future as we rush towards openness.

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The New OSTP Memo: A Roundup of Reactions and an Interview Preview

Karin Wulf and Rick Anderson provide a roundup of responses to the new OSTP public access memo — and a preview of their interview with OSTP leadership.

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Revisiting — Compliance: The Coming Storm

A look back at a 2015 post about approaches to improve funder policy compliance. Many of the same problems exist now as did then — are the same collaborative solutions likely to happen?

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Guest Post — Missing Revenue in the Global Flip: Getting the Open Access Math Right

A flip to open access requires a holistic view of a journal’s incoming revenue. Are there important contributions to revenue that disappear with open access, and how can those funds be replaced?

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Tribalism, Fraud, and the Loss of Perspective in Alzheimer’s Disease Research

A recent data falsification scandal in Alzheimer’s research raises new questions about perverse incentives in the culture and practice of science.

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Revisiting: Will the Future of Scholarly Communication Be Pluralistic and Democratic, or Monocultural and Authoritarian?

Rick Anderson revisits a 2020 post: One way or another, the #scholcomm community is going to choose either a diversity of publishing models or a monoculture, because it can’t have both. How will this choice be made, and by whom?

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Revisiting — Return of the Big Brands: How Legacy Publishers Will Coopt Open Access

Revisiting a 2015 post that predicted the dominance of the cascade model of journal portfolio publishing and the increased dominance of the larger existing publishers in an open access market.

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Fill in the Blank Leads to More Citations

When a reputable journal refuses to get involved with a questionable paper, science looks less like a self-correcting enterprise and more like a way to amass media attention.

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10 Years of Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research: An Interview with the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable (Part 2)

An interview with principals of the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable, whose work significantly shaped the Holdren Memo on public access to federally-funded research.

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10 Years of Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research: An Interview with the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable (Part 1)

An interview with principals of the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable, whose work significantly shaped the Holdren Memo on public access to federally-funded research.

The post 10 Years of Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research: An Interview with the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable (Part 1) appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.