10 Years of Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research: An Interview with the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable (Part 2)

An interview with principals of the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable, whose work significantly shaped the Holdren Memo on public access to federally-funded research.

The post 10 Years of Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research: An Interview with the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable (Part 2) appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.

10 Years of Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research: An Interview with the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable (Part 1)

An interview with principals of the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable, whose work significantly shaped the Holdren Memo on public access to federally-funded research.

The post 10 Years of Public Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research: An Interview with the Scholarly Publishing Roundtable (Part 1) appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.

 Guest Post — What Do Library-Publisher Relations Look Like in 2022?

The AUPresses Library Relations Committee asks Peter Berkery and Mary Lee Kennedy to share their thoughts about how relations between publishers and libraries have changed.

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Q: Can You Revoke a Creative Commons License? A: No. Er… Sort Of? Maybe?

A Creative Commons license is irrevocable; it says so right in the license. But it also says you can change your mind and distribute the work differently, or not at all. What does this mean?

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Annual Reviews’ Subscribe To Open: From Idea To Full Adoption

Annual Reviews will offer their journals as Subscribe to Open. Come read our interview with Richard Gallagher, President and Editor-in-Chief.

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Guest Post — Event Streaming Start-Ups: A Strategic Overview and Taxonomy

The value of streaming video as a genre of scholarly communication is just being established. Today, Danielle Cooper and Dylan Ruediger profile the leading start-ups in this space.

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A New Twist on a Publishing Scam: Ghost-authoring Book Reviews for Fun and Profit

In a new twist on academic fraud, a company now offers to pay you to write and publish book reviews that will be credited to someone else.

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Retroactively Open: Elsevier Backflips for NERL Agreement

In a novel license agreement, Elsevier agrees to open backfile content from a consortium of elite private institutions. Will other libraries and publishers follow this model?

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Revisiting: A Parable of Innovation in Publishing — A Mostly True Story

Joe Esposito looks back at a 2011 post offering a parable of the role in innovation in publishing and makes the case that we should not criticize companies that try and fail to do new things.

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Expanded Access to Paywalled Content: A Hidden Benefit of Transformative Agreements

What has not made headlines but is also a noteworthy outcome of transformative agreements is the significant increase in access and readership for paywalled articles that they facilitate. 

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The Future of Scholarly Societies: Interviews with Society Leaders (Part 2)

In this second of two posts, Robert Harington talks with several forward-thinking Society Executive Directors/CEOs, representing a range of fields, on the future of scholarly society operations and strategy.

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The Future of Scholarly Societies: Interviews with Society Leaders (Part 1)

In this first of two posts, Robert Harington talks with several forward-thinking Society Executive Directors/CEOs, representing a range of fields, on the future of scholarly society operations and strategy.

The post The Future of Scholarly Societies: Interviews with Society Leaders (Part 1) appeared first on The Scholarly Kitchen.

Revisiting — Additive, Substitutive, Subtractive: Strategic Scenarios for Publishers in an OA World

Revisiting a 2008 post noting that while it is often argued that open access will reduce the overall cost of scholarly communications, this article proposed that OA will be additive to the size of the current market.

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The State of the Version of Record

The “version of record” is an organizing concept in scholarly publishing. It is by referent to that version that others are understood and it is the object of financial models, policies, and recognition and reward systems.

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