Guest Post — Fifty Shades of Hybrid Conferences: Why Publishers Should Care (and How You Can Help)

Since in-person events are likely not going away, and neither are virtual ones, conference organizers are left with the most complex of options: hybrid. How can scholarly publishers help?

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The dawn of the age of duplicate peer review

Simultaneously submitting an article to multiple journals is considered an ethical violation. But the growth of preprints means that many articles are undergoing simultaneous yet parallel peer review processes. Will duplicate peer review become the norm?

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Pearson Launches a Comprehensive Textbook Solution for Students. What Are Its Prospects?

Pearson is offering online access to its entire textbook collection for $15 a month. Will students go for it?

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Revisiting — The Google Generation Is Alright

How much has changed in a dozen years? Lettie Conrad looks back at Ann Michael’s post from the 2009 SSP Annual Meeting, “Publishing for the Google Generation”.

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Pluralism vs. Monoculture in Scholarly Communication, Part 2

Calls for a monoculture of scholarly communication keep multiplying. But wouldn’t a continued diversity of models be healthier?

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Preprints Are Not Going to Replace Journals

At a recent meeting, a debate was held on the motion: Preprints are going to replace journals. I was asked to oppose the motion and this post is based on my arguments.

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Guest Post — BioASQ for the Win: Inside the Healthiest Competition You’ve Never Heard Of

A look at BioASQ — an annual competition to develop AI systems to help drive medical progress.

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Content at Scale – The Third Wave

Judy Luther looks back at the waves of change that have reshaped our industry. Looking ahead, the next big wave is to use analytics and AI as we complete the transition to open content.

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Guest Post – Starting a Novel Software Journal within the Existing Scholarly Publishing Ecosystem: Technical and Social Lessons

The Journal of Open Source Software was designed from scratch using the principles of open source and software design practices. This has both advantages and disadvantages, particularly with respect to elements of the traditional scholarly publishing ecosystem.

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The AUPresses Global Partner Program Begins: An Interview with the Partner Presses

A pilot program that seeks to deepen transnational dialogue and collaboration among mission-driven scholarly publishers.

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New Open Access Business Models — What’s Needed to Make Them Work?

A look at a session from last week’s CHORUS Forum that discussed new open access business models — what does it take to make them work?

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Feasibility, Sustainability, and the Subscribe-to-Open Model

Like all OA funding models, subscribe-to-open solves some problems while creating others. Some of the downsides are pretty fundamental.

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