Open Science Observatory – OpenAIRE Blog

“The Open Science Observatory (https://osobservatory.openaire.eu) is an OpenAIRE platform showcasing a collection of indicators and visualisations that help policy makers and research administrators better understand the Open Science landscape in Europe, across and within countries.  

The broader context: As the number of Open Science mandates have been increasing across countries and scientific fields, so has the need to track Open Science practices and uptake in a timely and granular manner. The Open Science Observatory assists the monitoring, and consequently the enhancing, of open science policy uptake across different dimensions of interest, revealing weak spots and hidden potential. Its release comes in a timely fashion, in order to support UNESCO’s global initiative for Open Science and the European Open Science Cloud (the current development and enhancement is co-funded by the EOSC Future H2020 project and will appear in the EOSC Portal).  …

How does it work: Based on the OpenAIRE Research Graph, following open science principles and an evidence-based approach, the Open Science Observatory provides simple metrics and more advanced composite indicators which cover various aspects of open science uptake such us

different openness metrics
FAIR principles
Plan S compatibility & transformative agreements
APCs

as well as measures related to the outcomes of Open Access research output as they relate to

network & collaborations
usage statistics and citations
Sustainable Development Goals

across and within European countries. ”

2022 International Training Workshop on Open Science and SDGs – CODATA, The Committee on Data for Science and Technology

“With the advent of the 21st century, human beings face unprecedented opportunities and challenges that call for Open Science and open collaboration. In response, the Sustainable Development Agenda was developed, and 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were adopted by all UN Member States in 2015 to address the critical global issues, including poverty, inequality, climate change, environmental degradation, peace and justice. In recent years, the concept of Open Science has been actively embraced by all walks of life and various disciplines. As stated in the UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science, Open Science has significantly transformed the way of knowledge production and distribution. It has been increasingly recognized as a critical accelerator for the achievement of the SDGs and a true game-changer in bridging the science, technology, and innovation gaps and fulfilling the human right to science.

By providing a scientific and practical guide to the use of Big Earth Data in relation to SDG-13, the objective of this training workshop is to increase expertise and build capacity of Open Science, thus contributing to the achievement of the UN SDGs. Participants will receive free online training focusing on knowledge and skills for valuable SDG-related cloud platforms, services, resources, and tools, especially with strong support from the CASEarth project. The deadline for applications is 11:59 pm CST (UTC+8) on July 31th….”

Pathways to Opening Access to Agricultural Research Knowledge in India

Scroll to p. 305. Abstract:  New knowledge is created by analysing and processing data and information. Having access to data and information promotes the generation of science, the communication of science, and the creation and adoption of new knowledge. All Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) include agriculture as an integral component, and agriculture should be prosperous and sustainable to achieve any SDG. Besides developing skilled and talented human resources, the Indian Agricultural Research System seeks to offer quality data and information to stakeholders to improve agricultural production, processing, and exports. However, access remains restricted despite the availability of data and information, making it impossible to achieve desired results. The purpose of this paper is to summarise how data, information and knowledge of NARS [e National Agricultural Research System] are available and accessible to various stakeholders during various phases of World Bank-supported projects and how the availability and accessibility to data and information exist in NARS.

Data tools for achieving disaster risk reduction: An analysis of open-access georeferenced disaster risk datasets – World | ReliefWeb

“The priorities of the Sendai Framework are to (1) understand disaster risk; (2) strengthen disaster risk governance to manage risk; (3) invest in disaster risk reduction and resilience; and (4) enhance the capacity to recover from disasters (UNDRR, 2015). This study advances our knowledge of implementing the Sendai Framework from publications that have utilized open-access spatial data and issues common to Framework implementation. The findings from a literature review reveal that many of the problems cited by recent work are data-related.

This study engages with these issues and discusses how they could be addressed by those who have a vested interest in disaster risk reduction, from policymakers to community members.”

The Bookseller – News – Emerald Publishing partners with Knowledge Unlatched for e-book collection

“Emerald Publishing has partnered with Knowledge Unlatched (KU) to create and promote an Open Access e-book collection in business management and economics. 

The exclusive deal starts from 2023 and is the first Open Access partnership of its kind for the publisher within its e-books portfolio.  

All book titles in the “Emerald Publishing – Responsible Management and the SDGs” package will also focus on responding to and achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with a particular focus on SDGs on decent work and economic growth; industry, innovation and infrastructure; and responsible consumption and production. 

Titles will cover themes such as diversity, inclusion and gender and racial equity in the workplace, sustainable tourism and ending forced labour, and how businesses of all sizes are working towards SDGs. …”

Building Structural Equity and Inclusion in Open Scholarship

“The choices we make in the transition to open system infrastructures for producing and sharing knowledge will affect how equitable Open Science systems will be in the future. The recent inequities in global health outcomes and the global vaccine inequality are however the stark reality. Institutions can work towards building structural equity by adopting values based in humanities, examining the ways in which current solutions might repeat systemic oppression, and centering and empowering women and vulnerable populations during the solution/system creation process, not after. Open Science can contribute to the creation of equity only if it enables historically marginalized people to learn about and research topics that are important to them and their communities, have their research recognized and rewarded – not through proxies –, and translate this into impact for their communities. Proposals for increasing equity in Open Science include removing barriers to access and publication of scientific papers, lowering language barriers, openly sharing unique collections, centering the voices of the most vulnerable, and decolonizing knowledge. Open scholarship models and infrastructures in science and humanities education attuned to the SDGs implementations and UNESCO’s Recommendation on Open Science, can also substantially contribute towards equity. The UNESCO Recommendation on Open Science in particular is the long-awaited, landmark instrument-setting agreement that provides an initial framework. In a society that daily manifests the pathology of data misuse, that heightens barriers to accessing scientific output, and allows the overconcentration of data-aggregating powers at the hands of purely commercial platforms lacking the checks and balances of democratic, public institutions, there are steps that both institutions and researchers at their workbench need to take to ensure access to research production and dissemination is equitable, data collection more democratic and transparently participatory….”

Open Science Policies as an Accelerator for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals

“The Journal of Science Policy & Governance (JSPG), the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the Major Group for Children and Youth (MGCY) are pleased to announce a call for papers and competition on shaping the future of global scientific practices in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic, focused on Open Science Policies as an Accelerator for Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

Open science is a movement towards a more accessible, more transparent, and more participatory way of designing, conducting, publishing, and evaluating scholarly research. Open science can be a true game changer in bridging the science, technology and innovation gaps between and within countries, fulfilling the human right to science and leaving no one behind. 

We invite students, post-doctoral researchers, policy fellows, early career researchers and young professionals from around the world to develop bold and innovative policy and governance ideas for exploring the untapped potential of open science to create a better society, and push for the attainment of the UN Agenda 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Submission deadline: July 10, 2022. …”

Connecting Sustainable Development, Publishing Ethics, and the North-South Divide – The Scholarly Kitchen

“The divide between the North and the South in scholarly publishing is often discussed and studied. We have also made some progress in reducing this gap, for example, in accessing research (e.g., Research4Life brings many global publishers under one umbrella to support the Global South), in publishing research (e.g., open access (OA) journals offer article processing charge (APC) waivers and discounts to researchers of Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs)), and in reducing geographical inequity (e.g., by publishing regional OA journals). Although we don’t often talk about the North-South divide in publishing ethics, a recent study shows a large variation in the awareness of academic integrity at the universities in Africa, Asia, and Europe. Developing countries’ organized battles against predatory journals can also be seen on some rare occasions….”

LYRASIS Research and an Inclusive Approach to Open Access in the United States | LIBER Quarterly: The Journal of the Association of European Research Libraries

In 2020, LYRASIS Research conducted a member survey of predominantly United States (U.S.) higher education libraries to understand the spectrum of attitudes and actions related to Open Access (OA). The results indicated that the U.S. approach to OA is decentralised, lacking the focused trends that are apparent in other areas of the world. The diversity among types of colleges and universities in the U.S. is revealed through discussions about support or lack thereof for APCs, crowdfunding models, preprint repositories, the Subscribe to Open approach, and more. The array of OA approaches that garner support in the U.S. may appear confusing as we strive for scale in our efforts. LYRASIS has used its research findings, in combination with our deep understanding of U.S. higher education libraries, to develop a collaborative approach towards OA that provides multiple incentives and opportunities for libraries serving all types of institutions to engage.

This article, expanding on the LIBER 2021 Conference Presentation of the same name, will outline the results of the survey, the conclusions LYRASIS has drawn, and our work to develop an inclusive approach to a variety of OA initiatives. Our understanding of the landscape of U.S. higher education has led us to develop or support several significant recent OA initiatives, including a fund for OA ebooks focused on United Nations Sustainable Development Goals topics and the establishment of the LYRASIS Open Access Community Investment Program (OACIP).

 

Connecting Sustainable Development, Publishing Ethics, and the North-South Divide – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Recently, I was preparing a talk for a NISO Plus 2022’s (February 15-17, 2022) panel on ‘Working towards a more ethical information community’. I started asking myself, if sustainable development works towards a just and ethical society, how does it deal with the Global North-South divide in the ethics of scholarly publishing?… 

Under global programs, like Research4Life, institutions of my Least Developed Country (LDC), Bangladesh, are now accessing thousands of journals for free and researchers are enjoying the APC waivers offered by many journals. But, all this will change in 2026, when Bangladesh will graduate from the LDC list. Do we realize that a change in a country’s economic status does not necessarily correspond with a change in that country’s research system and investments in it? Have we thought of any ethical coping mechanism for the researchers and authors of countries in similar economic transitions?

We need to ask ourselves, as we work toward the SDGs, can we really have an ethical scholarly community without addressing such a dynamic North-South divide? More specifically, are we contextualizing enough the ethical considerations of the North for the South as we address this divide? …”

 

Open science and the new normal | Research Information

“There can be no doubt that Covid-19 gave a boost to open science.

There’s nothing quite like a global pandemic to focus the mind on the need for openness and collaboration, and publishers and researchers quickly took unprecedented steps to reduce the barriers of access to research articles and data.

But as things begin to return to a ‘new normal’, and some of the barriers begin to reappear, it is important to consider what open science has actually gained from the pandemic, and some of the challenges that remain to be overcome in the face of other global challenges….

This is a point that ties into the theme of this year’s Open Access Week (www.openaccessweek.org): ‘It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity’. While it is easy to focus on the number of papers or amount of data that is being made available, it is important that we don’t ignore the issue of equity during the pandemic. Equity is about ensuring fair and impartial access to the whole of the scientific process, and typically the pandemic had the effect of exacerbating existing inequalities….”

 

Open science and the new normal | Research Information

“There can be no doubt that Covid-19 gave a boost to open science.

There’s nothing quite like a global pandemic to focus the mind on the need for openness and collaboration, and publishers and researchers quickly took unprecedented steps to reduce the barriers of access to research articles and data.

But as things begin to return to a ‘new normal’, and some of the barriers begin to reappear, it is important to consider what open science has actually gained from the pandemic, and some of the challenges that remain to be overcome in the face of other global challenges….

This is a point that ties into the theme of this year’s Open Access Week (www.openaccessweek.org): ‘It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity’. While it is easy to focus on the number of papers or amount of data that is being made available, it is important that we don’t ignore the issue of equity during the pandemic. Equity is about ensuring fair and impartial access to the whole of the scientific process, and typically the pandemic had the effect of exacerbating existing inequalities….”

 

Live Webinar: Sustainable development goals and scholarly communications – 1511374

“Please join us for this free, one-hour panel discussion and find out why (and how) libraries, research bodies and publishers alike should embrace the UN’s sustainable development goals – many of them brought into sharp focus at the recent COP26 summit – to benefit the global community.”