Connecting Sustainable Development, Publishing Ethics, and the North-South Divide – The Scholarly Kitchen

“The divide between the North and the South in scholarly publishing is often discussed and studied. We have also made some progress in reducing this gap, for example, in accessing research (e.g., Research4Life brings many global publishers under one umbrella to support the Global South), in publishing research (e.g., open access (OA) journals offer article processing charge (APC) waivers and discounts to researchers of Low- and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs)), and in reducing geographical inequity (e.g., by publishing regional OA journals). Although we don’t often talk about the North-South divide in publishing ethics, a recent study shows a large variation in the awareness of academic integrity at the universities in Africa, Asia, and Europe. Developing countries’ organized battles against predatory journals can also be seen on some rare occasions….”

LYRASIS Research and an Inclusive Approach to Open Access in the United States | LIBER Quarterly: The Journal of the Association of European Research Libraries

In 2020, LYRASIS Research conducted a member survey of predominantly United States (U.S.) higher education libraries to understand the spectrum of attitudes and actions related to Open Access (OA). The results indicated that the U.S. approach to OA is decentralised, lacking the focused trends that are apparent in other areas of the world. The diversity among types of colleges and universities in the U.S. is revealed through discussions about support or lack thereof for APCs, crowdfunding models, preprint repositories, the Subscribe to Open approach, and more. The array of OA approaches that garner support in the U.S. may appear confusing as we strive for scale in our efforts. LYRASIS has used its research findings, in combination with our deep understanding of U.S. higher education libraries, to develop a collaborative approach towards OA that provides multiple incentives and opportunities for libraries serving all types of institutions to engage.

This article, expanding on the LIBER 2021 Conference Presentation of the same name, will outline the results of the survey, the conclusions LYRASIS has drawn, and our work to develop an inclusive approach to a variety of OA initiatives. Our understanding of the landscape of U.S. higher education has led us to develop or support several significant recent OA initiatives, including a fund for OA ebooks focused on United Nations Sustainable Development Goals topics and the establishment of the LYRASIS Open Access Community Investment Program (OACIP).

 

Connecting Sustainable Development, Publishing Ethics, and the North-South Divide – The Scholarly Kitchen

“Recently, I was preparing a talk for a NISO Plus 2022’s (February 15-17, 2022) panel on ‘Working towards a more ethical information community’. I started asking myself, if sustainable development works towards a just and ethical society, how does it deal with the Global North-South divide in the ethics of scholarly publishing?… 

Under global programs, like Research4Life, institutions of my Least Developed Country (LDC), Bangladesh, are now accessing thousands of journals for free and researchers are enjoying the APC waivers offered by many journals. But, all this will change in 2026, when Bangladesh will graduate from the LDC list. Do we realize that a change in a country’s economic status does not necessarily correspond with a change in that country’s research system and investments in it? Have we thought of any ethical coping mechanism for the researchers and authors of countries in similar economic transitions?

We need to ask ourselves, as we work toward the SDGs, can we really have an ethical scholarly community without addressing such a dynamic North-South divide? More specifically, are we contextualizing enough the ethical considerations of the North for the South as we address this divide? …”

 

Open science and the new normal | Research Information

“There can be no doubt that Covid-19 gave a boost to open science.

There’s nothing quite like a global pandemic to focus the mind on the need for openness and collaboration, and publishers and researchers quickly took unprecedented steps to reduce the barriers of access to research articles and data.

But as things begin to return to a ‘new normal’, and some of the barriers begin to reappear, it is important to consider what open science has actually gained from the pandemic, and some of the challenges that remain to be overcome in the face of other global challenges….

This is a point that ties into the theme of this year’s Open Access Week (www.openaccessweek.org): ‘It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity’. While it is easy to focus on the number of papers or amount of data that is being made available, it is important that we don’t ignore the issue of equity during the pandemic. Equity is about ensuring fair and impartial access to the whole of the scientific process, and typically the pandemic had the effect of exacerbating existing inequalities….”

 

Open science and the new normal | Research Information

“There can be no doubt that Covid-19 gave a boost to open science.

There’s nothing quite like a global pandemic to focus the mind on the need for openness and collaboration, and publishers and researchers quickly took unprecedented steps to reduce the barriers of access to research articles and data.

But as things begin to return to a ‘new normal’, and some of the barriers begin to reappear, it is important to consider what open science has actually gained from the pandemic, and some of the challenges that remain to be overcome in the face of other global challenges….

This is a point that ties into the theme of this year’s Open Access Week (www.openaccessweek.org): ‘It Matters How We Open Knowledge: Building Structural Equity’. While it is easy to focus on the number of papers or amount of data that is being made available, it is important that we don’t ignore the issue of equity during the pandemic. Equity is about ensuring fair and impartial access to the whole of the scientific process, and typically the pandemic had the effect of exacerbating existing inequalities….”

 

Live Webinar: Sustainable development goals and scholarly communications – 1511374

“Please join us for this free, one-hour panel discussion and find out why (and how) libraries, research bodies and publishers alike should embrace the UN’s sustainable development goals – many of them brought into sharp focus at the recent COP26 summit – to benefit the global community.”

Using citizen science data to monitor the Sustainable Development Goals: a bottom?up analysis – CS Track

“This research explores whether citizen science data could be used to improve the monitoring of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). By investigating this issue from the perspective of citizen science, this research finds that citizen science projects see both valuable opportunities as well as deep-rooted barriers in linking their data to the SDGs….”

2nd United Nations Open Science Conference, Day 1 | UN Web TV

“2nd United Nations Open Science Conference, From Tackling the Pandemic to Addressing Climate Change, Day 1 …

Production Date:  21 Jul 2021

Video Length 05:09:17…”

Day 2: https://media.un.org/en/asset/k1t/k1tgtjna1u

Day 3: https://media.un.org/en/asset/k1g/k1gp7m0jx8

conference programme: https://www.un.org/en/library/OS21

Open Science Conference 2021 | United Nations

“With the advent of the pandemic, the component of openness in the scientific process has achieved criticality. Since 2019, when the Dag Hammarskjöld Library held the first Open Science Conference in the United Nations headquarters in New York, the global open movement has been significantly enriched with new national and international policies and frameworks as well as daring and visionary initiatives, both private and public. Research and funding institutions, libraries, publishers switched content to open access, in some cases overnight, to ensure unhindered access for researchers and the public, solidifying a tacit understanding of Open Science principles. The roundtable discussion among 19 eminent personalities in Open Science that preceded the Library’s 2019 Conference had resulted in a document of principles elaborating on the necessary elements needed for the creation of a Global Open Science Commons for the SDGs

In the 2nd OPEN SCIENCE CONFERENCE, From Tackling the Pandemic to Addressing Climate Change, policy makers, main IGO actors, librarians, publishers and research practitioners will engage into a public dialogue focusing on what Open Science has learned from COVID-19 and how this can be applied into actions addressing the global climate crisis, at the interface of science, technology, policy and research….”