The experiment begins: Arcadia publishing 1.0 · Reimagining scientific publishing

“Building on the open-source platform PubPub, we’re sharing the first iteration of our publishing website. In addition to posting our first set of research pubs, we’re documenting our progress in developing this new system for sharing science and hope you’ll provide feedback.

In thinking about how to share Arcadia’s research, we wanted to keep features of traditional publishing that have been honed over centuries, but improve upon what hasn’t quite adapted to the nature of modern science and technology. We have a unique opportunity to use our own research to develop mechanisms of sharing and quality control that can be more agile and adaptable. Our initial attempt is outlined here and we will continue to iterate upon it, always keeping the advancement of knowledge as our guiding principle when making decisions on what to try next.

This pub is intended to help you understand our thinking thus far, to provide a sense of what we’ve done and how the platform works, and to serve as a place to provide feedback on our strategy and the platform itself….”

The experiment begins: Arcadia publishing 1.0 · Reimagining scientific publishing

“In thinking about how to share Arcadia’s research, we wanted to keep features of traditional publishing that have been honed over centuries, but improve upon what hasn’t quite adapted to the nature of modern science and technology. We have a unique opportunity to use our own research to develop mechanisms of sharing and quality control that can be more agile and adaptable. Our initial attempt is outlined here and we will continue to iterate upon it, always keeping the advancement of knowledge as our guiding principle when making decisions on what to try next….

We are reimagining scientific publishing — sharing our work early and often, maximizing utility and reusability, and improving our science on the basis of public feedback.

This is our first draft. We have ambitious goals and we’re committed to replicable long-term solutions, but we also know that “perfection is the enemy of good.” We’re using this platform to release findings now rather than hiding them until we’ve gotten everything exactly how we want it. Readers can think of the pubs on this platform as drafts that will evolve over time, shaped by public feedback. The same goes for the platform itself! We’re treating our publishing project like an experiment — we’re not sure where we will land, but we can only learn if we try. In this pub, we’re sharing our strategy and the reasoning behind some of our key decisions, highlighting features we’re excited about and areas for improvement. …

Arcadia Science – Discovery Community Manager

“We are seeking an exceptional community builder who will help us develop Arcadia into a science and innovation hub that extends beyond its physical geography to engage with scientists throughout the full range of the research cycle. Ideally this person is a connector — someone who loves people and can design a range of initiatives to attract key constituents into our orbit, build meaningful long-term relationships with scientists in academia and biotech to shape our efforts, and solicit peer feedback for our research products. A strong candidate has full-time research experience in biology or a related field, is experienced in outreach, event organization, or community management, is comfortable working independently and managing multiple projects, and is able to manage collaborations and mediate conflicts. A major responsibility of the eventual recruit will be to help pilot Arcadia’s open science experiment, which relies heavily upon gathering public feedback on our research, so a genuine passion for open science and community building is a must. Successful applicants can expect to be compensated between $90,000-120,000/year with benefits and a highly competitive equity offering, depending on experience level….”

Open by Design: Arcadia Science, pushing the boundaries of open research | ICOR

“Arcadia Science, a research and development institute, uses biology as our most advanced technology, experiments with the broadest range of research organisms, and is inclusive of all scientific sectors. Our scientists share their insights and discoveries for collective benefit, accelerating scientific progress and commercial utility. We are building a new model for research, one that is financially self-sustaining, to empower scientists to focus on their work and capture their own value, free from traditional constraints.

Our specific ICOR-related goals are to:

Publicly post research data and products early and often to improve reach and utility for the scientific community
Broaden the nature of what is communicated beyond the content and organization of a typical journal article (e.g. full data sets, protocols, informative failures, future directions, challenges that may be collaborative tackled)
Encourage use of our research products by the scientific community and encourage public discussion to improve it by soliciting open feedback
Document our lessons learned to encourage others to adopt successful practices for broader sharing and evaluation of research…”

Arcadia and ICOR: Experiments in Open Science

“With ICOR we will be working on distributed experiments for collective gain. Some of the key areas of alignment between Arcadia and ICOR are in:

 

Developing Open Science Best Practices: As we develop our open science program, we will contribute to ICOR’s library of guidelines, sharing our approach, our documentation, and our learnings.

Creating an IP Toolbox: We believe that open science and commercialization do not have to be mutually exclusive. Establishing a strong and creative IP strategy is essential for proving that open science can support and speed our commercial pursuits. We have already learned from the resources provided by ICOR and are working on developing agreements and means of tracking our progress, which we will share back with the community.

Building Research Output Management Systems (ROMS) and Using Persistent Identifiers (PIDs): Scientists have traditionally relied on journals and journal articles to house and disseminate their data, but the journal system wasn’t built with today’s diverse and ever-expanding datasets in mind. New systems are needed to share and organize scientific research. Arcadia is committed to using PIDs to facilitate discoverability and to depositing data in repositories that meet FAIR (Findability, Accessibility, Interoperability, and Reuse) principles. Working towards shared data schemas for all research outputs will help facilitate discussion, review, and reuse.

Facilitated Collaboration: Collaboration is central to Arcadia’s success, and we aim to collaborate widely while maintaining our commitment to open science. We are in the process of developing our Collaborator Agreement, and will work with ICOR to share it, to track its success and any necessary revisions.

Modular Data and Review: It is current standard practice to release data and solicit peer review at the end of a project. We believe that releasing data more frequently and gathering and integrating community feedback more often and earlier in a project’s lifespan will accelerate science and produce better results.

Tracking Nano-Contributions: Author lists on journal articles do not accurately reflect a scientist’s contribution to a project and can promote territorialism and competition, rather than collaboration. Arcadia will be developing new methods for mapping contributions. These methods will provide a richer, more substantive picture of a person’s contribution, and ICOR will aid in measuring and tracking the success of these methods.

Metrics of Utilization: Knowing if and how people are using the data you produce is key to providing a valuable resource for the community. As we develop our ROMS, we will incorporate meaningful metrics to track utilization and will learn how to improve our data products to increase accessibility and reuse. …”

Arcadia Science and ICOR: Testing radical open in the real world | ICOR

“As ICOR begins its work to accelerate collaboration and open scholarship by connecting and facilitating projects throughout the research life cycle, we are excited to be able to collaborate with Arcadia to test new strategies in an ambitious and radically open environment. These efforts will also move us toward our goal of building a body of evidence on the growing impact of collaboration and open scholarship practices, tools, metrics, and incentives….”

Why I am building Arcadia.

“I walked away with the backing to establish a new startup, Trove….

At Trove, we are led by curiosity and remain committed to learning and sharing the knowledge we’ve gained. There is no need to lock up the lessons we’ve learned from others in the tick community. In fact, we have sought their feedback, and we will publish most of our protocols, tools, and datasets without paywalls or delays. It’s the most rigorous any of us have ever had to be, and all of this is in the absence of journals. Our work may ultimately translate into products that could be useful to many more people….

For all these reasons, I have decided to take the best parts of my experiences to build a new research organization called Arcadia Science. I am co-founding Arcadia with yet another fierce woman scientist Prachee Avasthi, who is a leader among leaders in the fight for open science. …”