OER and Collection Development, Oct 05, 2022, 3pm (BST) | IFLA

Do you work with collections at a university library and want to know more about open educational resources (OER) and the way they can influence the development of the collection at your library? Then register for this webinar!

When: October 5, 2022
Where: online
Starting Time: 1600 CEST, 1500 GMT, 0700 PDT
Duration: 90 min

Audience

This webinar is targeted towards librarians who work with or have an interest in collection development and management at university libraries. We hope to prompt thinking about the topic generally and consider how those who work in acquisitions/collections might integrate OER resources into their work. Anyone who would like to learn more about the relationship between OER and library collections is also welcome.

Speakers

The following speakers will each give a 15 minute presentation about OER in relation to other collection development activities at their institution or country:

Cécile Swiatek (University of Paris Nanterre Library, France)
Ezra Shiloba Gbaje (Federal University Lokoja, Nigeria)
Erin Fields (University of British Columbia Library, Canada)
Mira Buist-Zhuk (University of Groningen Library, Netherlands)

 

Wiley withdrawing key ebook titles from library collections – evidence required please | #ebooksos – Campaign to investigate the ebook market for libraries

A conversation was bought to our attention on Twitter a few days ago that went like this

– In June my library was told that Wiley would be removing 1,379 ebooks from our subscription packages. Because many of these books were heavily used, we looked into purchasing them with perpetual access but were told they were considered textbooks.
So basically, because these books were heavily used, Wiley decided to stop letting libraries buy them as ebooks. To top it off, we lost access the second week of classes. Faculty had planned their courses around students having library access to the texts. #TextbookEquity

– This happened to us, too, except to my knowledge we weren’t told. We found out when students tried to access these texts.

– Same. And some of them are actually just out of print now. You can’t even buy them from Amazon

– Yes, same deal from Wiley in Australia in lead-up to start of 2nd semester.

We are also receiving emails from UK librarians who are experiencing the same issues. Wiley are withdrawing access to key reading materials just a week or two before the beginning of the new academic year. We need to hear how this is impacting your library so we can highlight this matter to the CMA and MPs.

 

How to make more than 200 monograph titles available OA annually on a small-ish budget

When it comes to library budgets, how far can £10,000 stretch? Access to a small database, a couple of journals, a handful of article processing charges (APCs), maybe one OA book via a book processing charge (BPC)?

That figure might also support scholar-led and small university presses to publish more than 200 front-list monographs annually on an immediate open access (OA) basis. Sound interesting?

Jisc has been supporting a number of OA monograph community agreements, which operate on a few different models, but all with the aim of raising sufficient income to allow the publication of new monograph content without needing to charge the author a BPC.

 

Three crowdsourcing opportunities with the British Library | Digital scholarship blog @ BL

Digital Curator Dr Mia Ridge writes, In case you need a break from whatever combination of weather, people and news is around you, here are some ways you can entertain yourself (or the kids!) while helping make collections of the British Library more findable, or help researchers understand our past. You might even learn something or make new discoveries along the way!

Global Press Archive CRL Alliance adds Southeast Asian Newspapers as Digital Open Access Collection

The Center for Research Libraries and East View Information Services have launched Southeast Asian Newspapers(link is external), the fifth open access collection of titles digitized under the Global Press Archive CRL Alliance. Southeast Asian Newspapers follows Imperial Russian Newspapers(link is external), Independent and Revolutionary Mexican Newspapers(link is external), Late Qing and Republican-Era Chinese Newspapers(link is external), and Middle Eastern and North African Newspapers(link is external), the Alliance’s first five open access collections. Southeast Asian Newspapers adds to the growing body of open access material available in the Global Press Archive, by virtue of support from Center for Research Libraries members and other participating institutions.